Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Raphaela Stadler, Sacha Reid and Simone Fullagar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation and application of reflexive ethnography as an interpretative methodology for researching knowledge practices within…

1587

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation and application of reflexive ethnography as an interpretative methodology for researching knowledge practices within festival organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The ethnographic approach incorporates two methods of data collection in the research design; participant observation and in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The research identified that knowledge management practices and processes are often invisible to festival staff when they are embedded within a cohesive organisational culture. Ethnography enables the researcher to make explicit the tacit and normalised ways of working that contribute to the success (and failure) of festival organisations to manage knowledge. The immersion of the researcher in the ethnographic process provided a rich understanding of the relational dimension of knowledge management that would be difficult to elicit from in‐depth interviews alone.

Research limitations/implications

New fields of study require a range of research methodologies to inform theoretical and practice‐based knowledge related to event participation and management. This article contributes to the growing event management literature through a unique focus on ethnography as a research method that offers a deeper understanding of knowledge practices within festival organisations.

Originality/value

Limited research has applied an ethnographic approach to festival and event management. This article builds upon early adopters and provides critical insight into the benefits and constraints of ethnographic research.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Simone Fullagar and Adele Pavlidis

The purpose of this paper is to develop a gendered understanding of women's experience of a mass cycle tour event.

2197

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a gendered understanding of women's experience of a mass cycle tour event.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses an ethnographic approach to explore women's experiences of a cycle tour event. Qualitative data are analysed through the conceptual framework of post‐structural feminism.

Findings

Key themes included the meaning of women's cycle tour experience as a “shared journey”, the centrality of the “body” in event design (comfort, safety, enjoyment) and an event culture of “respect” (encouragement, skill development, knowledge sharing).

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a particular sample of women who were largely Anglo‐Celtic, middle to lower middle class and middle aged Australians. Hence, this research does not claim to be representative of all women's experiences. Given the strong focus on quantitative research within event management, this research identifies the need for qualitative and feminist approaches.

Practical implications

The research findings identify a number of gender issues for professionals to reflexively consider in designing, promoting, managing and evaluating mass cycle tour events. The findings have implications for how active tourism events are conceptualised, promoted and managed as gender inclusive.

Social implications

Developing a gender inclusive approach to events can broaden the participant target market and address equity issues relating to women's participation in physical activity.

Originality/value

There has been little exploration of the gendered experience or management of events in the literature. Hence, this paper contributes to empirical research and theorising of women's experiences of active tourism events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Raphaela Stadler and Simone Fullagar

Problem-solving approaches to research have dominated the not-for-profit festival management field. Little attention has been paid to how festival organizations successfully…

2130

Abstract

Purpose

Problem-solving approaches to research have dominated the not-for-profit festival management field. Little attention has been paid to how festival organizations successfully create cultures where knowledge transfer is practised within the high intensity of a festival life cycle. Drawing upon insights from social practice theory and appreciative inquiry (AI), the purpose of this paper is to offer a different conceptual approach to understanding how knowledge transfer “works” as an organizational practice to produce a collaborative festival culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon an ethnographic case study with the highly acclaimed Queensland Music Festival organization in Australia. The research questions and methods were framed around an appreciative approach that identified formal and informal practices that " worked " rather than a conventional problem-focused analysis.

Findings

This research focused on appreciating the cultural context that shaped the interrelationships between formal and informal knowledge transfer practices that enabled trust and collaboration. A range of knowledge transfer practices was identified that contributed to the creation of a shared festival ethos and the on-going sustainability of the festival vision.

Practical implications

The not-for-profit sector brings numerous challenges for festival organizations, and there is a need to appreciate how collaborative and creative knowledge transfer can occur formally and informally. Festival organizers can benefit from understanding the relational and practice dimensions of knowledge management as they are performed within specific organizational contexts.

Originality/value

An appreciative understanding of knowledge transfer practices has not yet been applied to not-for-profit festival organizations, where problem-solving approaches dominate the field.

Book part
Publication date: 9 March 2023

Gabriela Garton

In this chapter, I reflect on my experiences researching women's football in Argentina as a professional player in the teams I was studying, UAI Urquiza and Argentina's national…

Abstract

In this chapter, I reflect on my experiences researching women's football in Argentina as a professional player in the teams I was studying, UAI Urquiza and Argentina's national team. First, I explore some theoretical aspects of auto-ethnography and ethnography. Before entering into the main discussion of the text; however, I contextualise my work, starting with my access to the field and briefly summarising my own football career as an Argentine-American. Then, I articulate the categories of insider/outsider and native/non-native with my fieldwork and the transformations in the players, the sport and myself that I observed throughout my time in the field. Finally, the text concludes with a reflection on the limitations and opportunities offered by auto-ethnography in the social study of sport.

Details

Women’s Football in a Global, Professional Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-053-5

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Antonio Maturo and Francesca Setiffi

Abstract

Details

Wellness, Social Policy and Public Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-026-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2023

Jelena Balabanić Mavrović

Abstract

Details

Eating Disorders in a Capitalist World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-787-7

1 – 6 of 6