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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Sigrid Gibson

Children’s diets tend to be higher in sugars than those of adults, and parents often associate sugar with obesity. Contrary to this hypothesis, surveys of various age groups all…

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Abstract

Children’s diets tend to be higher in sugars than those of adults, and parents often associate sugar with obesity. Contrary to this hypothesis, surveys of various age groups all tend to show an inverse relationship between sugars and body mass index (BMI). In the latest National Diet and Nutrition Survey of children aged 11/2 to 41/2 years, children with the lowest sugar intakes, or whose diets were lowest in biscuits and cakes, or table sugar and preserves, had the highest BMI. Over‐emphasizing the avoidance of sugars may, paradoxically, be counterproductive in preventing obesity. Due to the phenomenon known as the sugar:fat see‐saw, a diet low in sugars tends to be proportionately high in fat. It is concluded that there is little justification in limiting NME sugars to 10 per cent of energy, for the avoidance of obesity.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 97 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Sigrid Gibson and Margaret Ashwell

The purpose of this paper is to decide whether consumption of red and processed meat is associated with iron intakes and/or iron status among young people in Britain. Data from…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to decide whether consumption of red and processed meat is associated with iron intakes and/or iron status among young people in Britain. Data from The National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Young People Aged 4‐18 Years was used. A total of 1,169 respondents completed a seven‐day weighed dietary record and provided a blood sample for iron status. Supplement‐users were excluded. RPM was defined as all red meat, meat products and offal excluding white meat. Found that, among girls, iron intakes were low but RPM was not associated with iron intake; boys were less prone to low iron intakes. Opines that low consumption of red meat has adverse implications for iron status. Dietary advice needs to emphasise the importance of bio‐available iron sources (such as meat) as well as other factors that increase iron bioavailability.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Anita Eves, Sigrid Gibson, David Kilcast and David Rose

Reports a study in which a structured questionnaire was used to elicitthe attitudes and knowledge of 451 women (18‐35 years), 217 dieters and234 non‐dieters to nutritional issues…

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Abstract

Reports a study in which a structured questionnaire was used to elicit the attitudes and knowledge of 451 women (18‐35 years), 217 dieters and 234 non‐dieters to nutritional issues. It included questions on frequency of reading labels, attitudes to and likelihood of buying products labelled with qualitative terms, and understanding of nutritional terms. Data were analysed to determine differences between dieters and non‐dieters. Dieters were significantly more likely to read labels, and gave more priority to “low in calories”. Both groups most often ranked “no additives” as most important. “Calories” and “fat” were most often associated with “fattening”, but “energy” and “joule” were less widely recognized. Dieters recognized more energy‐related terms. Significantly, more dieters knew that fat has more calories than sugar, but the majority of both groups thought saturated fatty acids had more calories than polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results indicate dieters to be slightly more knowledgeable, but that confusion remained over a number of issues.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

David H. Buss

This article briefly outlines the main objectives of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) programme of research in support of dietary surveys. It summarises the…

335

Abstract

This article briefly outlines the main objectives of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) programme of research in support of dietary surveys. It summarises the current portfolio of projects, then discusses in more depth the six projects being undertaken on further analysis of data from government dietary surveys, drawing on papers presented by the researchers at the annual meeting of this programme in London on 2 June 1998.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Margaret Ashwell

Summarises the reasons behind the formation of a network and support group for self‐employed nutritionists (SENSE). Discusses the pros and cons of self‐employment, and shows how…

174

Abstract

Summarises the reasons behind the formation of a network and support group for self‐employed nutritionists (SENSE). Discusses the pros and cons of self‐employment, and shows how the formation of SENSE is one way in which a con can be turned into a pro. Gives points of contact for potential members and users of the services that SENSE members offer.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2024

Sigrid Betzelt, Ingo Bode and Sarina Parschick

Regarding how the public regulation of human services is perceived within welfare organizations and how the latter cope with it, the role of emotions (as mediators between…

Abstract

Purpose

Regarding how the public regulation of human services is perceived within welfare organizations and how the latter cope with it, the role of emotions (as mediators between structure and agency) proves highly relevant while often being hidden beneath the surface. This article shows how a specific approach to such regulation – here: managerialism – may impact on “emotional regimes” at the organizational and individual level, affecting the attainment of organizational goals and workers' health.

Design/methodology/approach

The article primarily draws on multiple qualitative case studies across two welfare sectors (four organizations) in Germany (continuing education/active inclusion; long-term care). The study research was conducted between 2020 and 2022 and based on 36 interviews with caseworkers and managers, focus group interviews and expert dialogues at industry level.

Findings

The results suggest that the managerialist regulation of welfare services breeds complex and ambiguous emotional regimes. Business-like management techniques elicit various emotions, affecting the motivational basis of human service work. While the experience of hard challenges may raise positive feelings, coping patterns often put strain on organizations and staff alike. In the short run, related emotional regimes tend to make service delivery proceed smoothly, yet in the long run they may have corrosive effects and problematic repercussions on macro-level developments.

Originality/value

The study highlights the role of emotions in publicly regulated human service settings by intermingling macro- and micro-level processes and thereby broadens the perspective of welfare state research as it reveals the impact of (managerialist) regulation on the dynamic organizational chemistry of such settings.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2023

Maria Kjellgren, Sara Lilliehorn and Urban Markström

This study aims to gain a comprehensive understanding of adolescent’s experiences of individual school social work counselling in Swedish elementary schools.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to gain a comprehensive understanding of adolescent’s experiences of individual school social work counselling in Swedish elementary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The study encompasses interviews with 16 adolescents about their experiences of individual counselling with school social workers (SSWs). The data was analysed using conventional content analysis.

Findings

The main result was the adolescents’ desire “to navigate to shore” to speak freely about their whole lives with a professional SSW and find a “ safe haven,” […] where a trusting professional cared for and comforted them in counselling. The counselling contact contributed to increased knowledge about oneself. The results reveal the importance of the SSWs paying attention and listening to the adolescents’ narratives. The creation of a coherent life narrative enables to finally end counselling and “Cast off.”

Originality/value

The results highlight the importance of Swedish SSWs focusing on individual counselling sessions with adolescents to provide a setting for growth.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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