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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Clinton Amos, Iryna Pentina, Timothy G. Hawkins and Natalie Davis

This study aims to investigate the appeal of “natural” labeling and builds on past research which suggests that people may have a naïve pastoral view of nature and natural

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the appeal of “natural” labeling and builds on past research which suggests that people may have a naïve pastoral view of nature and natural entities. “Natural” labeling is pervasive in supermarkets across the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a multi-method approach to examine consumer perceptions and beliefs about products labeled “natural”. Qualitative responses are solicited to examine the images and feelings that come to mind when consumers see “natural” labeling on a food product. Two experiments are conducted to examine consumers’ evaluations of “natural” labeling on both food and supplement products.

Findings

The results of three studies suggest that “natural” labeling evokes positive feelings and sentimental imagery associated with a pastoral view of nature. These perceptions reinforce beliefs that food and supplement products labeled “natural” possess positive instrumental benefits such as health advantages, lack of contamination and safety.

Social implications

Consumers are under pressure to make better choices regarding what they put into their bodies due to pervasive concern over the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. This study provides insight into why consumers perceive food and supplement products labeled “natural” as better alternatives.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first studies to investigate the underlying perceptual forces accounting for the effectiveness of “natural” food and supplement labeling.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Subhalakshmi Bezbaruah, Amandeep Dhir, Shalini Talwar, Teck Ming Tan and Puneet Kaur

Fake news represents a real risk for brands, particularly for firms selling essential products, such as food items. Despite this anecdotal acknowledgement, the dynamics of…

Abstract

Purpose

Fake news represents a real risk for brands, particularly for firms selling essential products, such as food items. Despite this anecdotal acknowledgement, the dynamics of the relationship between fake news and brand reputation remain under-explored. The present study addresses this gap by examining the association of consumer values (universalism and openness to change), brand trust, fake news risk and system trust in the context of natural food products.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a cross-sectional survey design and the mall-intercept method to collect data from 498 consumers of natural food residing in India. To test the hypotheses, which were grounded in the stimulus-organism-response (SOR) framework, the collected data were analysed using covariance-based structural equation modelling in SPSS AMOS. The conceptual model proposed universalism and openness to change as stimuli, brand trust as an internal state or organism and fake news risk – captured through the tendency of consumers to believe and act on fake news – as a response.

Findings

The findings support a positive association of universalism with brand trust and a negative association with fake news risk. In comparison, openness to change has no association with either brand trust or fake news risk. Brand trust, meanwhile, is negatively related to fake news, and this association is moderated by system trust. Furthermore, brand trust partially mediates the relationship between universalism value and fake news risk.

Originality/value

Notably, the present study is one of the first attempts to understand the fake news risk associated with natural food brands by utilising the SOR framework in an emerging market setting. The study provides interesting insights for policymakers, brands and consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2022

Debarun Chakraborty and Ganesh Dash

Natural food products are becoming more popular, and their health-related benefits are widely acknowledged. The authors wanted to see the influence of different…

Abstract

Purpose

Natural food products are becoming more popular, and their health-related benefits are widely acknowledged. The authors wanted to see the influence of different consumption values on purchase intention of natural food products. To address this gap, the current study proposes to use theory of consumption values to explain customers purchase intention towards natural food products.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used theory of consumption values (TCV), attitude and purchase intention to develop a comprehensive model. About 464 respondents have responded to the structured questionnaire which was floated through email and WhatsApp. Finally, the authors used structural equation modelling and moderation analysis to arrive at the final results.

Findings

Except for social value, all constructs named conditional, functional, emotional and epistemic were found to have a favourable and significant impact on consumers’ purchase intention towards natural food products. The study shows that attitude has a moderating effect on the association between emotional value and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research illuminates the TCV which enable the long-term use of natural food products. In addition, the importance of attitude as a moderator of purchase intent provides a deep understanding of customer behaviour.

Originality/value

This model is the first of its kind in the current literature, using consumption values from the TCV with attitude to regulate purchase intention towards natural food products. In addition, theoretical advancements pave the path for future research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Clinton Amos, James C. Hansen and Skyler King

This paper aims to investigate inferences consumers make about organic and all-natural labeled products in both food and non-food contexts using the health halo effect as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate inferences consumers make about organic and all-natural labeled products in both food and non-food contexts using the health halo effect as a theoretical foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses three experiments to test the effects of organic and all-natural labeling across three product types, food, personal hygiene and household cleaning, while controlling for environmental attitudes.

Findings

The results of the experiments in the context of food, personal hygiene and household cleaning products suggest that both organic and all-natural labeling produce halo effects. Distinct findings are presented across the three product types.

Research limitations/implications

Findings indicate that consumers may make unwarranted inferences about both organic and all-natural labeled products and demonstrates that the health halo effect is a potentially robust phenomenon, pervasive across a diverse array of products. This research used a crowdsourcing platform for sample recruitment. Future research should validate the results of these experiments with other sample types.

Practical implications

This research suggests that consumers may make similar unwarranted inferences for diverse products bearing organic and all-natural labels. These inferences are particularly intriguing given the differing regulatory requirements for the labels

Originality/value

Organic and all-natural labels are ubiquitous in both food and non-food products. However, research on either label primarily exists in a food context and has not directly compared the labels. Understanding the inferences consumers make based on the labels across product types is imperative for both marketing and public policy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Vesselina Dimitrova, Mariana Kaneva and Teodoro Gallucci

This paper aims to examine the level of customer knowledge (CK) for natural cosmetic products, namely Bulgarian rose products, in three European countries – Bulgaria…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the level of customer knowledge (CK) for natural cosmetic products, namely Bulgarian rose products, in three European countries – Bulgaria, Montenegro and Italy – and to propose appropriate solutions for its management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research structure is based on a questionnaire and represents a part of the general investigation about the nature of the Bulgarian rose products. The study includes the responses to priority questions on customers' knowledge about these products. Feedback is received from 236 respondents in 450 distributed inquiries for the whole investigation.

Findings

The results of the research indicate that the role of the customers in the cognitive process of knowledge accumulation for the specific and rare aromatic rose products is captive, based on a new learning for the nature of the product and on the application of integrated marketing ideas for product development and promotion.

Practical implications

This paper gives suggestions for the customers' preferences of organizing communication systems by the use of integrated media mix of TV, internet and journals on the unique natural cosmetic products in Bulgaria. The empirical results show the opportunity to organize a collected database for healthy products as Bulgarian rose products.

Originality/value

The study of CK in the natural cosmetics industry is structured on the basis of logit regression model, which targets to analyze the increase of the chance for effective knowledge transfer with customers, with the recognition of motivation for purchasing natural Bulgarian rose products and the exchange of high‐grade information with customers about this product.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2018

Judith Müller-Maatsch, Johannes Jasny, Katharina Henn, Claudia Gras and Reinhold Carle

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the consumers’ perception of natural and artificial food colourants. Furthermore, attitudes towards the application of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the consumers’ perception of natural and artificial food colourants. Furthermore, attitudes towards the application of carmine, being technically important and ubiquitously used to impart red shades, are assessed and analysed. Originating from insects, carmine is considered as natural but may arouse disgust.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 625 individuals were surveyed using an online, self-administered questionnaire to represent a broad cross-section of the German population.

Findings

Independent of their origin, the application of colourants was rejected by 57.0 per cent of the interviewees. In total, 31.8 per cent of the participants stated a neutral attitude, while only 11.2 per cent expressed a positive notion. Most respondents preferred colourants from natural sources to artificial ones. While consumers perceive natural food colourants composed of genuine plant pigments positively, 61.6 per cent of respondents disliked the application of animal-derived colourants, 24.8 per cent of them did neither reject nor like it, and only 13.6 per cent of the interviewees stated a positive attitude towards them. The findings of this paper further indicate consumers’ preference for colourants to be either artificial or plant-derived rather than carmine. Food colourants are being rejected, possibly due to misleading information and confusing labelling. Consequently, information about carmine, including its origin and production, did not increase the aversion to products that are dyed with it, but increased their acceptance.

Originality/value

This study outlines consumer perception and attitudes towards food colourants. For the first time, the findings of this paper report the effect of revealing information about an additive, which initially aroused disgust, and its influence on consumer perception.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Sarah Hemmerling, Maurizio Canavari and Achim Spiller

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into European organic consumers’ attitudes towards natural food and in their sensory preference for it. It explores…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into European organic consumers’ attitudes towards natural food and in their sensory preference for it. It explores whether there is any evidence for a latent dimension that represents consumers’ attitudes towards naturalness and which aspects can be assigned to this dimension. However, the main scope is to investigate whether attitudes towards naturalness are able to predict the liking of natural food.

Design/methodology/approach

Sensory tests of strawberry yoghurt are combined with consumer information obtained by means of a standardised questionnaire. About 1,800 organic consumers from France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland and Switzerland were asked to blindly test two strawberry yoghurt samples that differed only in their absence/presence of an aroma additive.

Findings

On average, the consumers revealed a positive attitude towards natural food, but a negative sensory preference for the more natural yoghurt sample. Correlations between these two variables indicate that for most countries one cannot conclude that more naturalness-oriented consumers actually prefer the taste of more naturally flavoured yoghurts. This finding is interpreted as an attitude-liking gap.

Research limitations/implications

More research is necessary in order to clarify the reasons for the attitude-liking gap, since the authors can only speculate about these. Also, suitable data are needed to confirm the assumption made here that the naturalness of strawberry yoghurt can be determined by the degree of flavour intensity, especially against the background that the sensory skills of consumers are usually weak.

Originality/value

No attempt has been undertaken so far to test the claim that natural food products taste better and whether consumers with a positive attitude towards naturalness actually prefer the taste of a natural product over the taste of a more processed one. The present study attempts to fill this gap by exploring the preference for naturalness in a cross-national context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2018

Sidse Schoubye Andersen and Lotte Holm

This paper aims to present an analysis of the various dimensions of naturalness that shape the consumption practices of parents with young children.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an analysis of the various dimensions of naturalness that shape the consumption practices of parents with young children.

Design/methodology/approach

The study builds on semi-structured interviews with 17 mothers and fathers focusing on parental decision-making in everyday consumption from pregnancy to the first years of the child’s life.

Findings

Naturalness is a tool allowing parents to navigate in a world of risks and part of an everyday consumption practice that constructs and maintains children as vulnerable and parents as responsible. Parents perceive naturalness as something with three dimensions: familiarity, purity and culture. These three dimensions lead to different parental practices around consumption.

Originality/value

The analysis contributes to the authors’ understanding of parenting, childhood, risk, safety and consumption by showing how and why parents of young children construct naturalness as a three-dimensional ideal in their consumption practices.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Femke Damen, Ruud Verkerk and Bea Steenbekkers

Adolescence is a period in which autonomy grows and where children develop into independent and active consumers and a period in which their food choices are also becoming…

Abstract

Purpose

Adolescence is a period in which autonomy grows and where children develop into independent and active consumers and a period in which their food choices are also becoming more autonomous. Snacking is known to increase during the period of adolescence and the snack choice of adolescents is often unhealthy. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to know when adolescents perceive a snack as healthy. As healthiness perception could be linked to the perception of naturalness and sustainability of a snack, these are interesting product characteristics to study as well.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with 20 adolescents were conducted to characterize their perception of healthiness, naturalness and sustainability. Chocolate snack bars were used as a stimulus product.

Findings

All participants mentioned consuming snacks because they like them. Healthiness was seen as important but was not always a priority in adolescents' snack choices. Naturalness and sustainability were concepts which the adolescents were not aware of or did not perceive as important during snack choice. The adolescents mentioned experiencing natural products to be healthier compared to not natural products. The consequences of the discerned dimensions time, impact and effect of choices were rather limited for this target group.

Originality/value

Understanding the healthiness, naturalness and sustainability perception of chocolate snack bars by adolescents may help to better understand drivers for adolescents' snack choices.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 31 March 2015

Anand Kumar Jaiswal, Harit Palan and Ingita Jain

Launched in 2005, Aava natural mineral water is one of the key brands in the natural mineral water market in India. It had sales of over Rs. 15 crore (150 million) in 2012…

Abstract

Launched in 2005, Aava natural mineral water is one of the key brands in the natural mineral water market in India. It had sales of over Rs. 15 crore (150 million) in 2012 and it is the second largest brand and a volume leader in the natural mineral water category. The case discusses the dilemma faced by its Managing Director and his team in light of the emerging competition. The company needs to take important decisions related to customer segment selection, product mix and introduction of new product offerings.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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