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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Tom Baum, David Solnet, Richard Robinson and Shelagh K. Mooney

This is an invited 75article for Tourism Review addressing tourism employment, past and future.

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Abstract

Purpose

This is an invited 75article for Tourism Review addressing tourism employment, past and future.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis of tourism employment with a focus on paradox.

Findings

Inherent paradox which underpins tourism employment.

Originality/value

A wholly original take on tourism employment.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Shelagh K. Mooney

The purpose of this paper is to explain the problem with how gender is positioned in hospitality and tourism management studies. It recommends critical theories to investigate how…

3282

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the problem with how gender is positioned in hospitality and tourism management studies. It recommends critical theories to investigate how gender is researched in the sector’s academic and institutional systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual study explains contemporary gender theories and gives examples of relevant hospitality and tourism management studies. A four point critical agenda for researching gender is proposed and justified.

Findings

The study highlights how the focus on “female leadership” as different from the male norm and the use of traditional theoretical framings reinforce stereotypes about the primacy of women’s domestic commitments to their detriment.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this academy focussed study is that it has not recommended specific initiatives to combat specific issues of gender discrimination in hospitality and tourism employment. A further limitation is that the primary focus was on critical management theory to explain heteronormative based gender discrimination. It did not discuss queer theory.

Practical implications

In addition, a new research agenda, steps are proposed to change the masculine culture. Hospitality and tourism universities and research institutions should review men’s/women’s/gender diverse representation at leadership levels. Critical gender research approaches may also be fostered by sectorial conference streams and journal special issues and university graduate research students should be taught to design such studies.

Social implications

The use of contemporary approaches in gender studies will enable researchers to propose more targeted equality and diversity management actions for industry. They will also assist educators to better design curricula that protect and promote the interests of women studying a hospitality, tourism or events degree and those who identify as gender diverse.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the masculine status quo in hospitality and tourism management gender studies, arguing that adherence to traditional orthodoxies has stifled the development of critical paradigms and methodologies. Its key contribution is to reveal the advantages that critical gender theorising can bring to further the aim of gender equality by showing practical applications.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Irene Ryan and Shelagh Karin Mooney

The purpose of this paper is to show how the social categories of gender, age and class influence networking practices and career progression in the 4–5-star hotel sector in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the social categories of gender, age and class influence networking practices and career progression in the 4–5-star hotel sector in Australia and New Zealand. It argues that in this type of workplace the practice of networking is so normalized that it is assumed an inclusive, gender-neutral activity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on 18 semi-structured interviews. Inductive analysis was used uncover themes, sub-themes and emergent patterns. An intersectionally sensitive approach was followed.

Findings

The significance of networking processes for career progression in the 4–5-star hotel sectors was a recurring theme. Networking reflects historically embedded gendering practices that heighten existing class-based structural privilege for groups of men.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is on hotel employees in Australia and New Zealand with the findings are not implicitly generalizable.

Practical implications

Networks are important for women as their “merit” may not be immediately visible. Well-structured mentoring schemes need to be adopted as part of the affirmative action required to tilt the “skewed playing field”.

Originality/value

Studies that indicate how the gendering of networking practices reinforce career privilege and penalty in specific organizations have been lacking, as have studies favouring an intersectional approach. This study seeks to redress these omissions.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Shelagh K. Mooney, Candice Harris and Irene Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to explore why workers remain in long hospitality careers and to challenge the frequent portrayal of careers in the sector as temporary and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why workers remain in long hospitality careers and to challenge the frequent portrayal of careers in the sector as temporary and unsatisfactory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took an interpretative social constructionist approach. Methods used were memory-work, semi-structured interviews and intersectional analysis.

Findings

A key finding in this study is that career longevity in hospitality is not solely dependent on career progression. Strong social connection, a professional self-identity and complex interesting work contribute to long careers.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes detailed empirical knowledge about hospitality career paths in New Zealand. Conclusions should be generalised outside the specific context with caution.

Practical implications

The findings that hospitality jobs can be complex and satisfying at all hierarchical ranks hold practical implications for Human Resource Managers in the service sector. To increase career longevity, hospitality employers should improve induction and socialisation processes and recognise their employees’ professional identity.

Social implications

This paper significantly extends the notion of belonging and social connection in service work. “Social connection” is distinctly different from social and networking career competencies. Strong social connection is created by a fusion of complex social relationships with managers, co-workers and guests, ultimately creating the sense of a respected professional identity and satisfying career.

Originality/value

The contemporary concept of a successful hospitality career is associated with an upwards career trajectory; however, this paper suggests that at the lower hierarchical levels of service work, many individuals enjoy complex satisfying careers with no desire for further advancement.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Tom Baum, Shelagh K.K. Mooney, Richard N.S. Robinson and David Solnet

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the immediate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the hospitality workforce in situ between mid-April and June 2020.

21367

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the immediate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the hospitality workforce in situ between mid-April and June 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint paper that brings together a variety of sources and intelligence relating the impacts on hospitality work of the COVID-19 pandemic at three levels: macro (global, policy, government), meso (organisational) and micro (employee). It questions whether the situations faced by hospitality workers as a result of the pandemic are seed-change different from the precarious lives they normally lead or just a (loud) amplification of the “normal”.

Findings

In light of the fluid environment relating to COVID-19, conclusions are tentative and question whether hospitality stakeholders, particularly consumers, governments and the industry itself, will emerge from the pandemic with changed attitudes to hospitality work and hospitality workers.

Practical implications

This raises questions about hospitality work for key stakeholders to address in the future, some of which are systemic in terms of how precarious labour forces, critical to the global economy are to be considered by policy makers, organisations in a re-emerging competitive market for talent and for those who chose (or not) to work in hospitality.

Social implications

This paper contributes to ongoing debates about precarious work and the extent to which such practices are institutionalised and adopts an “amplification model” that may have value in futures-orientated analysis about hospitality and tourism.

Originality/value

This paper is wholly original and a reflection on the COVID-19 crisis. It provides a point of wider reference with regard to responses to crises and their impact on employment in hospitality, highlighting how ongoing change, fluidity and uncertainty serve to magnify and exacerbate the precarious nature of work in the industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Shelagh Mooney and Irene Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to ask whether it is the notion of choice (a pro‐life work/life balance decision) that influences woman's desire to strive for promotion within a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask whether it is the notion of choice (a pro‐life work/life balance decision) that influences woman's desire to strive for promotion within a hotel organisation or is the choice made for female managers by a system of organisational processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This research within an international hotel group in Australia and New Zealand explored what barriers prevent women from reaching the top echelons in hotel management. A qualitative approach used semi‐structured interviews to study the intersection of gender, age and time in life with career progression and their combined impact on the glass ceiling phenomenon.

Findings

The interviews revealed that the perception of glass ceiling barriers faced by women differed depending on where they were in their career cycle. They were revealed as the “long hours” culture, the old boy's network, hiring practices and geographical mobility. These significantly influenced women's work‐life balance, and personal‐life choices.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews were carried out in three locations across a variety of job positions; therefore, this study has a reasonable degree of validity. Findings could be applied to other large hotel enterprises in Australia and New Zealand.

Practical implications

The findings from this study offer implications for management practice.

Originality/value

The hospitality industry faces a worldwide shortage of skilled staff. This paper seeks to answer why the hotel sector is struggling to retain talented female employees who wish to take advantage of the managerial career paths offered.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

172

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

5

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

213

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Katie Turner, Shelagh Ferguson, Julia Craig, Alice Jeffries and Sarah Beaton

Are peaches, Caesar salad and chocolate masculine or feminine food? Literature suggests that there is a clear association between certain types of food, portion sizes and gendered…

3035

Abstract

Purpose

Are peaches, Caesar salad and chocolate masculine or feminine food? Literature suggests that there is a clear association between certain types of food, portion sizes and gendered identities. This research paper and short film aims to explore the theory in practice of food consumption for young consumers, particularly impression management required to create/maintain an attractive identity to the opposite sex.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt an interpretive approach to an in‐depth analysis of the food practices of an all male and an all female household. They use a theory in practice methodology to explore their food consumption.

Findings

It is found that despite enlightenment in many areas, gendered identities are still strongly associated with food consumption. The experiment in which each household consumed a meal associated with the opposite gender offers insight into the association between food consumption and gendered identity. The social implications of the research demonstrate that masculine identity is supported and negotiated through what he is eating, whereas feminine identity is being constructed by what she is not eating. It is concerning that an attractive feminine identity is premised on omission rather than consumption and traps many females into a negative and potentially harmful relationship with food consumption.

Originality/value

The use of videography allows insight into the negotiation of an underpinning cultural attitude where women eat less to be what consumer culture has defined as an attractive feminine identity which means being slimmer and smaller than males.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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