Search results

1 – 10 of 17
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Soha Abutaleb, Noha El-Bassiouny and Sara Hamed

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer intentions toward carpooling as a collaborative consumption practice. The paper uses the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer intentions toward carpooling as a collaborative consumption practice. The paper uses the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in studying consumer intentions toward carpooling. It extends the theory to add personal norms as a major component in examining consumer intentions. It also adds two main motivational factors for collaborative consumption, which are economic benefits and sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a conclusive descriptive study using surveys. The research sample consists of 500 respondents from millennials. The study uses structural equation modeling to analyze the survey results.

Findings

Results showed that subjective norms and attitudes had the most significant impact on intentions toward carpooling, followed by perceived behavioral control (PBC) and personal norms. Economic benefits and sustainability also showed a significant impact on attitudes toward carpooling practice. Measurement and structural models showed a good model fit.

Originality/value

The paper provides original data on consumer intentions toward carpooling as a type collaborative consumption behavior using the TPB with the inclusion of personal norms. The research also contributes to the growing nuances of sustainability in the context of the sharing economy. The study is considered the first of its kind to combine the TPB, personal norms and motivators of collaborative consumption, including economic benefits and sustainability, to examine their impact on intentions toward carpooling.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Sara Hamed, Noha El-Bassiouny and Anabel Ternès

The purpose of this study is to combine the two fields of transformative service research (TSR) and evidence-based design (EBD) to improve the healthcare service provided in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to combine the two fields of transformative service research (TSR) and evidence-based design (EBD) to improve the healthcare service provided in hospitals. TSR and EBD are two separate research fields that aim to improve the well-being of consumers within the service sector. Research propositions for making changes in the hospital physical environment to improve the patient well-being are developed to link the two fields.

Design/methodology/approach

This work takes a theoretical approach to develop research propositions based on the literature. The research propositions guide the development of the framework developed for future studies under TSR and EBD.

Findings

The research propositions should be tested empirically in future studies to develop a methodology for transforming a hospital physical environment. The implementation of these propositions would allow hospitals to reach a new and more sustainable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The relationship between the domains of TSR and EBD has not been explored before in the literature. This study presents an unprecedented work that is needed to improve patient well-being. It contributes to TSR and EBD by providing a research agenda for healthcare practitioners and researchers to pave the way for achieving improved healthcare services focusing on patient well-being and sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Sara Hamed

Marketing and brand management examples used in classes usually revolve around publicly traded corporations. Students are expected to learn how to deal with branding problems that…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Marketing and brand management examples used in classes usually revolve around publicly traded corporations. Students are expected to learn how to deal with branding problems that can arise in new types of organizations as family businesses.

Case overview/synopsis

The case study discusses a brand identity and brand management problem facing the Founder of Habiba Community, Maged El Said. Habiba Community is an initiative focusing on sustainability and giving back to community. Many foundations were established under Habiba Community, such as its beach lodge, organic farm and learning center. The beach lodge and organic farm were more familiar to tourists and visitors than the other established foundations. The organic farm produced many organic products sold nationally and internationally. The founder was now faced with the challenge of whether to create one brand identity for Habiba Community as a whole or to go for separate brand identities for each of its foundations.

Complexity academic level

This case study is developed for students of the bachelor level in marketing and design studies. The case difficulty is regarded as intermediate as it includes new trends and ideas from the field of marketing and branding (as eco-branding and family business branding) and new trends in the tourism service industry (as voluntourism). Courses in which this case study can be used are integrated marketing communication, corporate identity, services marketing and brand management under marketing and graphic design studies. The case study is not designed for earlier courses in marketing and design, as students need to have basic knowledge in marketing and branding beforehand.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Soha Abutaleb, Noha M. El-Bassiouny and Sara Hamed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religiosity in online collaborative consumption contexts. It analyzes the impact of religiosity in influencing consumer life…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religiosity in online collaborative consumption contexts. It analyzes the impact of religiosity in influencing consumer life decisions and behaviors. The proposed framework is based on the norm activation theory (NAT) with religiosity added to it based on the extant literature. The paper aims to provide implications for marketing researchers and practitioners derived from its analysis and propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The current paper proposes a model for marketing researchers to consider the role of religiosity as a cultural and psychological factor in influencing online collaborative consumption. The NAT is adopted as the base of the conceptual model. The model posits research propositions on the potential interaction of religiosity with existing relationships in the theory to predict online collaborative consumption behavior.

Findings

The NAT is considered a prominent model in studying pro-environmental behaviors and it was adopted in various studies. Some researchers adopted the theory to study collaborative consumption as a pro-environmental behavior. Religiosity was found to significantly impact pro-environmental behaviors, but no research was found regarding its impact on collaborative consumption. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research and implications to marketing practitioners about the role of religiosity in influencing collaborative consumption behavior.

Originality/value

Although there were few research studies that exist in discussing the role of religiosity in explaining consumer behavior, it could be argued that this paper is the first of its kind, according to the best of the authors’ knowledge, that discusses the role of religiosity in online collaborative consumption contexts through the use of NAT.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2022

Aya Kasber, Noha El-Bassiouny and Sara Hamed

The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of religiosity on luxury and counterfeit purchase intentions and to determine the role of consumer ethics in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of religiosity on luxury and counterfeit purchase intentions and to determine the role of consumer ethics in the context of counterfeit purchase intention. The conceptual framework is based on Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). In the context of counterfeit consumption, religiosity is proposed to be an added component to the theory, while ethical consumption is proposed to mediate the relationship between religiosity and counterfeit purchase intention. In the context of luxury consumption, religiosity is proposed to precede TPB components which then affect luxury purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive study; this study uses a mixed-methods approach, where eight semi-structured in-depth interviews and 500 surveys were conducted and distributed to Egyptian luxury consumers.

Findings

The major results suggest that religiosity and ethical consumption negatively affect counterfeit purchase intention as proposed. The results also reveal that religiosity did not necessitate a negative attitude toward luxury consumption. Religiosity was found to have a positive effect on attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. Only subjective norms had significant effect on luxury purchase intention in the research context.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the TPB by adding religiosity to the theory components as well as integrating the theory of planned behavior with Consumer’s Ethics theory in the context of counterfeit consumption. The study is an attempt to compare between luxury and counterfeit purchase intention while considering the role of individual’s religiosity in these purchases.

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2022

Soha Abutaleb, Noha El-Bassiouny and Sara Hamed

The current study is exploring factors affecting social and sharing behavioral intentions. The paper proposes a new theory, the consumer social behavior theory, which aids in…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study is exploring factors affecting social and sharing behavioral intentions. The paper proposes a new theory, the consumer social behavior theory, which aids in understanding social behaviors. This is through the convergence of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and norm activation theory (NAT) to foster the understanding of sharing and social behaviors. Religiosity, as a cultural and psychological factor, along with five major predictors of sharing practices are also incorporated. These predictors are economic benefits, sustainability, enjoyment, trust and difficulties in sharing practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study takes a new route through proposing a new theoretical contribution and developing a new theory termed consumer social behavior theory (CSBT) to be commonly used in social behavioral contexts.

Findings

The CSBT is an output of integrating two prominent theories in pro-social and pro-environmental contexts. It is found that integrating both theories help in thoroughly examining behavioral intentions. Religiosity is found to significantly impact intentions towards social behaviors, yet no study examined its role in sharing and social behaviors contexts.

Originality/value

This study is contributing to and enriching the sharing economy research domain through new theoretical developments. A theory adaptation for TPB and NAT was conducted to advance a thorough understanding of sharing and social behavioral intentions. This work is considered the first of its kind to develop an integrated view for sharing and social behaviors.

Details

Management & Sustainability: An Arab Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-9819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Sara Hamed and Noha El‐Bassiouny

The aim of this paper is to identify the different values that were communicated through the visuals of the Egyptian revolution of January 25th, 2011 with reflections on those…

848

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify the different values that were communicated through the visuals of the Egyptian revolution of January 25th, 2011 with reflections on those that were communicated historically in Germany to highlight how these visuals can act as tools of informal education and social marketing campaigns to citizens of a country.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research paper takes a qualitative exploratory approach. The method that was utilized is content analysis, with the sub‐method used to analyze the content of the street visuals being semiotic analysis.

Findings

The main social and religious values communicated between citizens in Egypt and Germany were about freedom, peace, unity, and victory. These street visuals help in communicating social and religious values to citizens of a country at the time of the revolution and recording them keeps their messages for future generations to come. Accordingly, these visuals help in informally educating citizens and act as social marketing campaigns from and to the people.

Research limitations/implications

The results here should not be regarded as conclusive results as they are of a qualitative nature and should be followed and tested by future quantitative research.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research paper is to fill the gap in literature by blending all the different research domains about informal education research, social marketing, graffiti and street art papers, and the historical revolution accounts. There was no prior research conducted with either a similar aim or under all these previous domains.

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Abubakar Mohammed Abubakar and Belal Hamed Taher Shneikat

eLancing is a networked online platform used for distributive problem-solving, economic production and service delivery. The platform includes websites/marketplaces where…

Abstract

Purpose

eLancing is a networked online platform used for distributive problem-solving, economic production and service delivery. The platform includes websites/marketplaces where individuals interested in being hired, and clients looking for individuals to perform some type of work meet. eLancing boasts millions of users and billions of dollars in transactions, and it involves fundamental changes in the nature of work. The motivations of this research stems from the credo and notion in which the advances in technology are transforming firm and market structures, employee-employer relationship and the increased intimacy with decentralized system. In order to explore new applications for the eLancing model, there must be a better understanding of why individuals participate in eLancing activities. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 48 semi-structured interviews were conducted online with workers at elance.com.

Findings

Ten primary motivators for participation emerged that include following: work-family balance, flexibility and autonomy; economic incentives; skills development; trust and transparency; geographical location; unemployment, equality and disability; higher returns; reputation; passion and enjoyment in problem-solving; and revenge.

Originality/value

The current study has added rich qualitative data to the scanty eLancing literature and managerial implications are discussed.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Bev Orton

Abstract

Details

Women, Activism and Apartheid South Africa: Using Play Texts to Document the Herstory of South Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-526-7

Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Alexandra Desy and Diana Marre

The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) defines the act of travelling abroad to undergo reproductive medical treatments, including assisted reproduction…

Abstract

The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) defines the act of travelling abroad to undergo reproductive medical treatments, including assisted reproduction technology (ART) treatments as cross-border reproductive care. The experiences of patients seeking affordable reproductive care abroad have been widely studied in the last decades (Bergman, 2011a, 2011b; Blyth, 2010; Bracewell-Milnes et al., 2016; Culley et al., 2011; Guerzoni, 2017; Hudson, 2017, 2020; Hudson & Culley, 2011; Kroløkke, 2014a, 2014b; Rodino, Goedeke, & Nowoweiski, 2014; Salama et al., 2018; Shenfield et al., 2010; Van Hoof, Pennings, & De Sutter, 2016; Whittaker, Inhorn, & Shenfield, 2019; Zanini, 2011). However, French women and couples pursuing ART treatments abroad have received little scholarly attention until now. In this chapter, we aim to address this gap in the literature with the results from an ethnographic study conducted with French women and couples who seek ART treatments in Barcelona (Spain) using data from participant observation and in-depth interviews. We begin by discussing the European reproscape, introducing French and Spanish ART legislation, to explain why a large number of citizens are excluded from the French system of reproductive governance and why they choose Spain as their destination. Then, we will discuss the obstacles faced during the reproductive journey, and the impacts of this journey on the embodiment of the treatments are explored, in order to show how French women and couples handle the physical, emotional and cultural displacements that their reproductive project entails.

1 – 10 of 17