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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Maria Bartnes Line and Eirik Albrechtsen

This paper aims to discuss whether recent theoretical and practical approaches within industrial safety management might be applicable to, and solve challenges experienced…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss whether recent theoretical and practical approaches within industrial safety management might be applicable to, and solve challenges experienced in, the field of information security, specifically related to incident management.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was carried out.

Findings

Principles, research and experiences on the issues of plans, training and learning in the context of industrial safety management would be suitable for adoption into the field of information security incident management and aid in addressing current challenges.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of reasons why approaches from industrial safety management have something to offer to information security incident management: the former field is more mature and has longer traditions, there is more organizational research on industrial safety issues than on information security issues so far, individual awareness is higher for industrial safety risks and worker participation in systematic industrial safety work is ensured by law. More organizational research on information security issues and continuous strengthening of individual security awareness would push information security to further maturity levels where current challenges are solved.

Practical implications

This paper shows that the field of information security incident management would gain from closer collaborations with industrial safety management, both in research and in practical loss prevention in organizations. The ideas discussed in this paper form a basis for further research on practical implementations and case studies.

Originality/value

The main audience of this paper includes information security researchers and practitioners, as they will find inspirational theories and experiences to bring into their daily work and future projects.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Thomas Simpson, Dan Wheatley, Vivienne Brunsden and Rowena Hill

The purpose of this paper is to discuss methods of capturing the impact of fire and rescue service (FRS) community safety work which directly aims to reduce the occurrence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss methods of capturing the impact of fire and rescue service (FRS) community safety work which directly aims to reduce the occurrence of specific incidents.

Design/methodology/approach

The impact assessment method described focuses on addressing one of the major problems with regards to attributing outcomes to FRS community safety work; the influence of external factors. This paper looked to assess the incident trends within a case study UK FRS within the context of the following external data sets: first, incident trends within other UK FRSs; second, demographic trends; and third, incident data from other public services.

Findings

There were instances, either across the whole region served by the case study FRS, or within specific districts, where evidence suggested a strong likelihood of the community safety work of the case study FRS contributing towards an observed reduction in incidents. These findings were established through filtering the impact of widespread external factors, which could impact upon incident figures.

Research limitations/implications

The utility of this impact assessment relies upon FRS consistently recording the specific aims and focus of individual community safety activity, so that any positive outcomes can be attributed to a particular group of community safety initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper discusses how an evaluation process, to determine the likelihood of community safety impacting upon incident numbers, can be practically applied to a FRS.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Marie Kerveillant and Philippe Lorino

The paper aims to investigate how far the pragmatist concept of inquiry (Dewey, 1916, 1938) makes it possible to develop a processual and relational approach to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate how far the pragmatist concept of inquiry (Dewey, 1916, 1938) makes it possible to develop a processual and relational approach to accountability, moving the focus away from a representational conception of truth and subjectivist/individualist views on meaning-making, toward collective exploration and understanding of an issue by stakeholders with the aim of transforming social practices. The paper studies an accountability process in action, namely nuclear incident reporting, and its role in the construction of a community of inquiry investigating nuclear safety.

Design/methodology/approach

This research opts for a case study methodology including 36 in-depth interviews, field observation and document analyses. The data are drawn from a three-year field study of a “Local Information Commission”, a body set up to represent the public living near a nuclear site.

Findings

The object of accountability needs to be constructed through a joint exploratory inquiry by accountors and accountees into reports of incidents as originally presented, to advance their understanding and capacity for action.

Research limitations/implications

It will be important to test this processual and relational approach to accountability in other types of situation, involving different governance issues than nuclear safety.

Practical implications

To turn theoretical stakeholders such as the public into real stakeholders (e.g. in the studied case, active participants in safety inquiries), specific social and managerial conditions must be fulfilled (concerning time, resources, commitment to open, taboo-free dialogue and legitimacy).

Originality/value

The paper argues that Dewey's concept of inquiry makes a valuable contribution to the processual and dialogical view of accountability.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Stig Ole Johnsen

The purpose of this paper is to support the implementation of safety and security guidelines in the Norwegian oil and gas industry and verify the actual use of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to support the implementation of safety and security guidelines in the Norwegian oil and gas industry and verify the actual use of the guidelines by industry and authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research approach was used, exploring organisational learning as described by Argyris and Schon and by Nonaka and Takeuchi as “The knowledge‐creating company.” Interviews (analysis of interviews), workshops and reviews of guidelines and audits were performed in addition to “learning workshops” trying to create understanding and compliance related to the guidelines among industry and authorities.

Findings

The guideline OLF104 is used in the Norwegian oil and gas industry, by operators and by suppliers and checked through audits. However, the guideline should influence working procedures at operators more. The guideline seems to have improved resilience.

Research limitations/implications

The impact of the guideline on safety and security should be more systematically assessed. It is suggested that improvement of experience and knowledge related to safety, security and resilience of distributed control systems could improve the guidelines.

Social implications

The paper shows that there is improved awareness, safety, security and resilience when process control systems are integrated with ICT systems.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper is the exploration of a broad‐based action‐based approach, involving key stakeholders in a structured manner, to improve practices and facilitate implementation of safety and security guidelines. The contribution is also an empirical documentation of the implementation of key issues of security and safety in guidelines between two different areas of competence, ICT and process control. The paper will be of interest to the key stakeholders: the industry, authorities and the media.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Abdul Qayoom and Bonaventura H.W. Hadikusumo

Previous research studies have testified that safety culture positively affects safety performance. However, the progression by which safety culture affects safety

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research studies have testified that safety culture positively affects safety performance. However, the progression by which safety culture affects safety performance has not yet been examined. Also, how safety culture affects the overall safety performance at different levels of the organization is yet to be explored. In order to address this issue, the purpose of this paper is to study the effect of multilevel safety culture upon safety performance over time.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual causal-loop diagram is constructed using the group model building approach to establish the relationship between safety culture components (e.g. psychological, behavioral and situational) and the factors associated with safety performance (e.g. risk level, safety behavior, unsafe conditions, unsafe acts and incident rate). Considering the dynamic nature and intricacy of the safety management system, the system dynamics approach has been employed to develop the model.

Findings

The results indicate that the safety culture at the tactical level (middle management) and operational level is much more effective than strategic level (top management) in ameliorating the safety performance of the organization.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study is limited to the effect of multilevel safety culture on safety performance. The focus is on the dynamics of personal, behavioral and situational factors of top management, middle management and workers to reinforce the safety performance of the organization. Future research can be protracted to build other models of safety.

Practical implications

First and foremost, the findings summarized in this paper can be implemented by organizations to achieve the total safety culture to upgrade safety performance.

Originality/value

This paper presents the holistic view of multilevel safety culture in an organization’s hierarchy. It shows how multilevel level safety culture in an organization interacts with the safety management system to enhance the safety performance of the organization.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Alison Leary, Robert Cook, Sarahjane Jones, Mark Radford, Judtih Smith, Malcolm Gough and Geoffrey Punshon

Incident reporting systems are commonly deployed in healthcare but resulting datasets are largely warehoused. This study explores if intelligence from such datasets could…

Abstract

Purpose

Incident reporting systems are commonly deployed in healthcare but resulting datasets are largely warehoused. This study explores if intelligence from such datasets could be used to improve quality, efficiency, and safety.

Design/methodology/approach

Incident reporting data recorded in one NHS acute Trust was mined for insight (n = 133,893 April 2005–July 2016 across 201 fields, 26,912,493 items). An a priori dataset was overlaid consisting of staffing, vital signs, and national safety indicators such as falls. Analysis was primarily nonlinear statistical approaches using Mathematica V11.

Findings

The organization developed a deeper understanding of the use of incident reporting systems both in terms of usability and possible reflection of culture. Signals emerged which focused areas of improvement or risk. An example of this is a deeper understanding of the timing and staffing levels associated with falls. Insight into the nature and grading of reporting was also gained.

Practical implications

Healthcare incident reporting data is underused and with a small amount of analysis can provide real insight and application to patient safety.

Originality/value

This study shows that insight can be gained by mining incident reporting datasets, particularly when integrated with other routinely collected data.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Sharon Newnam and Carlyn Muir

Road trauma remains a significant concern internationally. Traffic crashes rank within the top three leading causes of death for individuals aged between 15–44 years old…

Abstract

Road trauma remains a significant concern internationally. Traffic crashes rank within the top three leading causes of death for individuals aged between 15–44 years old, with nonfatal casualties occurring at around 30 times the rate of fatal incidents. Historically, road safety research has not captured factors relating to driving purpose. However, more recently, researchers have focused on the importance of driving for work. Over a third of traffic volume represents commuting or driving in the line of employment; improving workplace road safety practices represents a tangible way of reducing road trauma. This chapter considers the link between safety culture and best practice in workplace road safety. It is argued that best practice is not a term to define individual safety practices, but a system of practices that create a culture of safety. This research uses data collected on organizations workplace road safety practices within the Australian context. This data has been collected by the National Road Safety Partnership Program (NRSPP); an initiative that constitutes a network of organizations and academics working together to develop a positive road safety culture. Twenty-four case studies are presented of organizations that have implemented workplace road safety programs to improve their safe driving culture. Qualitative analysis was conducted to systematically categorize the safety initiatives and their indicators of success. Almost all case studies expressed the importance of developing a safety-first culture in the workplace. Third-party regulation, internal policy and corporate social responsibility form the foundation of workplace safety. However, it was the culture and attitude towards the safety initiatives that achieved effectiveness in the long-term. The findings of this research support the argument that best practice is best achieved when integrated within a culture that values and prioritizes safety, rather than implemented in isolation to other elements in the workplace system.

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Kelly Ann Schmidtke, Ivo Vlaev and Karen Baber

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether the dissemination systems that hospitals use to spread information about particular safety incidents can be enhanced using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether the dissemination systems that hospitals use to spread information about particular safety incidents can be enhanced using behavioural economics concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

The current service evaluation took place within eight wards in a single acute care hospital. It was conducted as a randomized controlled trial with two groups. In the control group nothing was altered. In the intervention group ward managers received additional support to disseminate information to their nurses. Nurses were randomly selected to be surveyed during their scheduled shifts. The surveys revealed how the nurses learned about particular safety incidents and how many they remembered.

Findings

Nurses in the intervention group were more likely to learn about particular safety incidents than nurses in the control group.

Practical implications

Enhancing common dissemination systems in hospitals can increase organizational learning about safety incidents. The current study presents some means by which dissemination systems can be enhanced.

Originality/value

The current service evaluation is a unique application of behavioural economics concepts to enhance organizational learning of particular adverse safety incidents in an NHS hospital.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Gary D. Holt and David J. Edwards

The purpose of this paper is to investigate causal agents of health and safety (H&S) incidents among “plant-trailers” (as used by construction and utility contractors to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate causal agents of health and safety (H&S) incidents among “plant-trailers” (as used by construction and utility contractors to transport mechanical machinery); including the relationship(s) of such incidents to routine safety inspections and, plant maintenance functions.

Design/methodology/approach

H&S plant-trailer incident data, from a collaborating UK-based case study utility company are analysed using inductive, interpretative and descriptive statistical methods.

Findings

Principal incident occurrences relate to trailer wheels, wheel bearings, tyres and braking systems. All forms of incidents observed harbour significant risk and especially, if they occur during travel on public highways. Derived recommendations for incident mitigation and control, suggest a requirement for improved human behaviour, machinery inspection regimes and maintenance systems.

Research limitations/implications

The findings will be valuable to academia as a basis for advancing this new research subject, both empirically and internationally. Direction is offered in this respect.

Practical implications

Recommendations will be of practical relevance to machinery management practitioners generally and to plant-trailer stakeholders more specifically. For the latter, the study encourages introspective consideration of plant-trailer H&S systems.

Originality/value

No previous research has targeted these issues relating to plant-trailers.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Xinyi Liu, Zhiyong Li, Qiqi Zhang and Yue Zhang

This study aims to identify the factors influencing Chinese outbound tourists’ perceptions of safety in Thailand. A media coverage analysis compares the safety perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the factors influencing Chinese outbound tourists’ perceptions of safety in Thailand. A media coverage analysis compares the safety perceptions of visitors and non-visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was adopted. Based on a content analysis of 204 news items related to safety incidents in Thailand, this paper divides the factors of safety perception into four dimensions. The quantitative data were gathered by self-administered questionnaires from 370 visitors who have previously visited Thailand and 407 potential visitors yet to visit Thailand.

Findings

The results demonstrated significant differences in the safety perceptions of visitors and non-visitors, indicating non-visitors’ fear of uncertainty and intolerance of the exotic. The study also confirmed social-demographic characteristics influence destination safety perceptions. For non-visitors, safety issues tend to have a negative influence on future visit intention, but those with previous travel experience have less concerns.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide valuable insights to industry practice. More publicity campaigns within the Chinese media may reduce the spillover effects of crisis events and correct the potentially inaccurate images of disease and terrorism risk. Thai government is suggested to develop the Chinese inbound market, improve the quality of tourism infrastructure and standardisation and efficiency of tourism services.

Originality/value

The media plays a significant role in destination image, tourist decision-making and safety measures imposed by governments. This study identified the factors influencing Chinese outbound tourists’ perceptions of safety in Thailand through an analysis of media coverage. The study provides a better understanding of the differences in safety perceptions between visitors and non-visitors to Thailand. The segmentation of visitors and non-visitors also may help destination managers to cater to differing expectations of safety.

研究目的

本研究旨在探讨中国赴泰游客和潜在赴泰游客对泰国安全认知的影响因素。本研究通过对媒体报道文本的分析,识别出中国出境游客泰国安全感的影响因素,并进一步对游客与潜在游客在安全感知上的差异进行对比。

设计/方法/方法

本研究采用了混合方法。本文通过对204篇泰国安全事件新闻报道的内容进行分析,将安全感知因素分为四个维度。定量研究数据是从370名有泰国旅游经历的游客和407名没有去过泰国的潜在游客中收集的。

研究结果

研究结果显示游客与潜在游客在安全认知上有显著差异,体现了潜在访客对异国情调的不确定性和不宽容。本研究也证实了社会人口学特征对两个群体的目的地安全感知都有影响。此外,对于潜在游客来说,大多数安全问题都会对他们未来的访问意图产生负面影响,但对于游客来说,结果则相反。

原创性/价值

媒体在目的地形象、旅游决策和政府安全措施方面发挥着重要作用。本研究以媒体报导为分析工具,探讨中国出境游客泰国安全感的影响因素。这项研究有助于更好地了解中国赴泰游客和潜在游客在安全认知方面的差异。游客和潜在游客的细分也有助于目的地管理者满足他们对安全的特定期望。

研究局限性/启示

我们的发现为行业实践提供了有价值的见解。在中国媒体上开展更多的宣传活动,可以减少危机事件的外溢效应,纠正有关疾病和恐怖主义风险的潜在地不准确形象。此外,泰国政府应提高旅游基础设施的质量,提高旅游服务的标准化和效率。

Propósito

Este estudio identifica los factores que influyen en la seguridad percibida de Tailandia por los turistas emisores chinos, con el análisis de la cobertura de los medios, y además compara las diferencias en las percepciones de seguridad entre visitantes y no visitantes.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Se ha adoptado una metodología mixta. Basado en el análisis de contenido de 204 noticias sobre incidentes de seguridad en Tailandia, este trabajo divide los factores de percepción de seguridad en cuatro dimensiones. Los datos cuantitativos se recopilaron mediante cuestionarios autoadministrados de 370 visitantes que tenían experiencia en viajes a Tailandia y 407 visitantes potenciales que no habían estado en Tailandia.

Resultados

Los resultados demuestran diferencias significativas en la percepción de seguridad de los visitantes y no visitantes, lo que indica el miedo de los no visitantes a la incertidumbre y la intolerancia de lo exótico. Este estudio también confirma que las características sociodemográficas influyen en la percepción de seguridad del destino de cada grupo. Además, para los no visitantes, la mayoría de las cuestiones de seguridad influyen negativamente en su intención de visita futura, pero para los turistas, los resultados son contrarios.

Limitaciones/implicaciones de la investigación

Los resultados brindan información valiosa para la práctica de la industria. Más campañas publicitarias en los medios chinos podrían reducir los efectos secundarios de los eventos de crisis y corregir las imágenes potencialmente inexactas sobre los riesgos de enfermedades y terrorismo. Además, el gobierno tailandés debería mejorar la calidad de su infraestructura turística y aumentar la estandarización y eficiencia de los servicios turísticos.

Originalidad/valor

Los medios de comunicación juegan un papel importante en la imagen del destino, la toma de decisiones turísticas y las medidas de seguridad de los gobiernos. Este estudio identifica los factores que influyen en la seguridad percibida de Tailandia por parte de los turistas chinos, con el análisis de la cobertura de los medios. El estudio proporciona una mejor comprensión de las diferencias en las percepciones de seguridad entre visitantes y no visitantes de Tailandia. La segmentación de visitantes y no visitantes también ayuda a los gestores de los destinos a satisfacer expectativas específicas de seguridad.

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