Search results

1 – 10 of 21
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Roy Deveau, John Ockenden and Petra Björne

Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman’s work on modes of “thinking” provides a comprehensive text which is little explored in respect of work with people who have an intellectual or…

Abstract

Purpose

Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman’s work on modes of “thinking” provides a comprehensive text which is little explored in respect of work with people who have an intellectual or developmental disability. This paper aims to explore the potential of this work to change staff development and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Key themes from Thinking Fast, and Slow (Kahneman, 2011) are described and applied to current staff practice.

Findings

Modes of thinking are relevant and important to understanding and improving manager and staff practice.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to describe and understand staff thinking and practice using Kahneman’s ideas.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Roy Deveau and Sarah Leitch

Concerns about the overuse, misuse and potential abuse of restrictive interventions used to manage people who may exhibit behaviour described as challenging led to revised…

471

Abstract

Purpose

Concerns about the overuse, misuse and potential abuse of restrictive interventions used to manage people who may exhibit behaviour described as challenging led to revised guidance in England. The purpose of this paper is to examine the implementation of this guidance in organisations providing services for people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey collected data from professionals, on leadership, data use, staff issues and post-incident review.

Findings

Most senior leaders were seen as acting on the guidance. Data collected were regarded as generally accurate, but less than half of the managers were seen as likely to respond to consistently high or increasing use of restrictive practices. Frontline staff and managers were seen as very significant for reducing restrictive practices. Uncertainty was shown regarding the goals and activities needed to provide post-incident review.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory survey may be useful for organisations wanting to audit their implementation of government policy and/or for research on a wider scale to indicate how well societies are implementing policy to reduce restrictive practices. Further research on the survey’s validity and reliability is required.

Practical implications

Further action is needed to encourage all organisations to implement best practice and government policy. This survey showed that some organisations appear to be committed to and potentially achieving reductions in restrictive practices.

Originality/value

This paper describes the first survey designed to evaluate organisational efforts to implement an important policy initiative.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Roy Deveau

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Rhodes and Toogood’s article on the possible relationship between Active Support training and staff job satisfaction.

187

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Rhodes and Toogood’s article on the possible relationship between Active Support training and staff job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Rhodes and Toogood unusually and importantly include outcomes for both frontline staff and service users following an Active Support intervention. This commentary builds upon this approach by drawing on ideas recently raised by Deveau and McGill (2015).

Findings

A number of important themes are identified including the mutuality of direct support staff (DSS) and service user experience, the significance of considering both the formal and informal aspects of organisational culture and the value of employing a complexity theory perspective.

Originality/value

Effective public services require an understanding of the factors influencing the behaviour of public service staff. In intellectual disability services, positive outcomes can only be obtained through a broader appreciation of the drivers of DSS behaviour, especially the roles played by culture and leadership.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Lex Wijnroks

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Exploring new ways of thinking about and developing staff practice: the role of modes of thinking” written by Roy Deveau

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Exploring new ways of thinking about and developing staff practice: the role of modes of thinking” written by Roy Deveau, John Ockenden and Petra Bjorne.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary considers the consistency of Kahneman’s model of thinking fast and slow with brain research.

Findings

The thinking styles of staff undoubtedly influence their responses to people with learning disabilities. Although Kahneman’s model provides a heuristic approach to tackling prejudicial and biased thinking, it risks incomplete solutions through bypassing some of the factors contributing to staff behaviour.

Originality/value

This commentary concludes that Kahneman’s model is not completely consistent with knowledge about how the brain is organized. This should be regarded as a limitation of any model seeking to explain decision-making.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Roy Deveau

81

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Roy Deveau, Peter McGill and Jo Poynter

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of the highest cost residential placements provided for adults with learning disabilities in the South East of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of the highest cost residential placements provided for adults with learning disabilities in the South East of England, comparing findings with a previous survey.

Design/methodology/approach

Lead commissioners for NHS and Local Authority teams in the South-East of England were asked to provide information on the five highest cost placements that they currently commissioned.

Findings

The average placement cost was £200,000 per annum with a range from £81,000 to £430,000 per annum. Individual characteristics of people placed were broadly similar to those identified in previous studies.

Originality/value

Significant resources are used to support relatively few individuals. These individuals’ needs and characteristics suggest areas for research and practice development.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Peter McGill, Jill Bradshaw, Genevieve Smyth, Maria Hurman and Ashok Roy

The purpose of this paper is to outline the role played by different aspects of the social, physical and organisational environments in preventing behaviour described as…

1564

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the role played by different aspects of the social, physical and organisational environments in preventing behaviour described as challenging in people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual elaboration drawing on research and practice literature.

Findings

Community placements for people with learning disabilities should develop the characteristics of capable environments. Such characteristics are associated with prevention of challenging behaviour and improved quality of life outcomes.

Originality/value

The notion of the capable environment may help to shift the focus from the individual who displays behaviour described as challenging to the characteristics of the social, physical and organisational supports that they receive.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Adam Clifford and Francesca Georgina Kemp

“Case-complexity” is a widely used but under-explored concept across health and social care. A region’s Intensive Support Teams (ISTs) had been reporting an increase in…

Abstract

Purpose

“Case-complexity” is a widely used but under-explored concept across health and social care. A region’s Intensive Support Teams (ISTs) had been reporting an increase in “case-complexity”, but had not tested this hypothesis against data. This study aims to investigate this question through a pragmatic mixed-methods approach as part of a wider service evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for People with Learning Disabilities (HoNOS-LD) scores were used (n = 1,766) to estimate average “case-complexity” of referrals over an eight-year sample period. Two focus groups for IST staff (n = 18) explored why “case-complexity” appears to be increasing. Participant perspectives were subjected to thematic analysis.

Findings

Average HoNOS-LD scores have steadily increased over the sample period, suggestive of increasing “case-complexity”. Focus groups identified three broad themes to potentially explain the increased complexity: effects of Transforming Care; people’s changing and unchanging support systems; and issues related to mild and borderline intellectual disability. Many perspectives are grounded in or supported by evidence.

Research limitations/implications

Implications and limitations of findings are discussed, including areas for further consideration and research. The well-designed “short-cut” is promoted as a strategy for busy professionals in need of practice-based evidence but with limited research time and resources.

Originality/value

The findings and discussion will be of value to anyone involved in the design, commissioning and delivery of mental health and challenging behaviour services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) under Transforming Care. Study methodology is easily replicable to build broader picture about “case-complexity” among UK’s IDD population.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of 21