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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Roy C. Wood

Offers a brief sociological sketch of some current issues in thecultural analysis of food and eating as they apply to dining out. Seeksto demonstrate the importance to everyday…

Abstract

Offers a brief sociological sketch of some current issues in the cultural analysis of food and eating as they apply to dining out. Seeks to demonstrate the importance to everyday life of the hospitality industry in terms of consumption, employment and environmental issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Roy C. Wood

Examines the relationships between gender and dining out. Arguesthat there are demonstrable continuities between food consumption in thehome and in the arena of public dining. At…

Abstract

Examines the relationships between gender and dining out. Argues that there are demonstrable continuities between food consumption in the home and in the arena of public dining. At the heart of the food system in Britain is the role played by women as family “carers”. Women sustain a dietary culture which is seen as health‐giving. Despite this, they are often excluded in a variety of ways from enjoyment of food and, in the context of commercial provision of food, are marginalized as consumers. Explores these issues in the context of theoretical discourse on food‐culture relationships and market data on food consumption outside the home, concluding that, however effective nutrition education may be, advances in healthy eating provision by commercial hospitality organizations are antithetical to the principal of hedonism which underpins such provision.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Arsène H. Aslan and Roy C. Wood

Given the principal characteristics of hotel and catering industryemployment – low pay, low job security, high labour turnover,often arbitrary management – it is a matter of some…

Abstract

Given the principal characteristics of hotel and catering industry employment – low pay, low job security, high labour turnover, often arbitrary management – it is a matter of some interest that the industry is unionized to only a limited extent. Offers a brief summary of the principal reasons advanced for explaining low unionization in the industry before proceeding to focus on the attitudes of hotel managers towards these explanations. Reports research based on interviews with managers in Scotland, during which individuals were asked to respond to a range of points with a view to ascertaining the continuing relevance or otherwise of the findings of previous research. Principal findings are that a tension exists between a general, if reluctant, acceptance of the need, by managers, for union representation in the industry and a belief in their own managerial efficacy which makes unions irrelevant to their particular circumstances.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Ian R. Macaulay and Roy C. Wood

Reports and analyses the findings of recent research undertaken infive Scottish centres to assess hotel and catering workers′ attitudes totrade unions. Initially, reviews the…

Abstract

Reports and analyses the findings of recent research undertaken in five Scottish centres to assess hotel and catering workers′ attitudes to trade unions. Initially, reviews the reasons advanced in explaining low union density in the hotel and catering industry. These explanations formed the basis to the research project which are reported. The research fieldwork comprised interviews with hotel and catering workers in a variety of establishments across a range of industry sub‐sectors. Contrary to what would have been expected from a review of previous research, Scottish hotel and catering workers demonstrated positive views of trade unions and a high level of interest in union membership. In the light of such views, gives consideration to the reasons why hotel and catering workers remain largely non‐unionized in terms of employer hostility to trade unions and employee doubts about the potential for union success in the industry.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Linda J. McKie and Roy C. Wood

The perceived relationships between diet and health amongst asample of working‐class women in North‐east England are examined,highlighting the impact of “food scares” current at…

Abstract

The perceived relationships between diet and health amongst a sample of working‐class women in North‐east England are examined, highlighting the impact of “food scares” current at the time of the research fieldwork on dietary beliefs and practice. Economic constraints are a major barrier to “healthier eating” in certain working‐class subcultures, but social conceptions of “good” food also often conflict with dietary advice. The findings of the research presented here demonstrate that this conflict may be heightened by the confusion and controversy attendant on “food scares”, causing anger and resentment amongst women, the principle recipients of dietary information.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Linda J. McKie and Roy C. Wood

Presents an analysis of data collected by questionnaire from 50respondents on their sources of recipes. The questionnaires werecompleted by men and women who were members of…

Abstract

Presents an analysis of data collected by questionnaire from 50 respondents on their sources of recipes. The questionnaires were completed by men and women who were members of various groups and communities located in the Edinburgh area. The data are analysed in respect of gender, class, age variations and variations according to family size. Concludes that the recipe possesses a social significance that merits greater attention, for it is the starting point of many culinary and related activities. The implications of such findings for the food industry are manifold. Many respondents identified the purchase and receipt of cookery books, the collection of recipes, and the exchange of recipes as related activities. As such, the cultural significance of the recipe and its importance in food marketing cannot be underestimated.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Roy C. Wood

This article offers a preliminary analysis of the relationshipsbetween the domestic and commercial provisioning of food relative togender differences in society. Its central theme…

1007

Abstract

This article offers a preliminary analysis of the relationships between the domestic and commercial provisioning of food relative to gender differences in society. Its central theme is that any understanding of patterns of food provision and consumption must not be based on marketing theory alone but take cognisance of the social processes that inform dietary behaviour, and in particular the extent to which such processes are mediated by the role of women both as preparers and consumers of food. In order to illustrate these arguments, comparisons are made of domestic and commercial “food systems” and the role of women relative to these.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Erwin Losekoot, Ruud van Wezel and Roy C. Wood

This paper examines conceptual links between facilities and hospitality management in the context of customer satisfaction. In both areas, there has thus far been a lack of…

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Abstract

This paper examines conceptual links between facilities and hospitality management in the context of customer satisfaction. In both areas, there has thus far been a lack of theorising about the subject‐matter which might legitimately be encompassed within subject boundaries. By focusing on the single area of customer satisfaction an attempt is made to show how this process might proceed, albeit in a narrowly focused manner. The paper examines “hard” and “soft” dimensions to facilities management in hotels by means of an investigative probe into the nature of customer complaints in hotels. No claims are made for the generalisability of findings, rather it is the intention to show how, in the application of facilities management concerns, it is possible to engage in conceptual development and empirical study.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Hans de Bruijn, Ruud van Wezel and Roy C. Wood

The growth of facility or facilities management as an academic discipline and a set of “real world” practices has been accompanied by continuing uncertainty as to how the field…

4168

Abstract

The growth of facility or facilities management as an academic discipline and a set of “real world” practices has been accompanied by continuing uncertainty as to how the field should be defined. That this issue remains a “live” one is reflected in the various academic and professional commentaries on the subject. Explores the nature of facilities management in the context of vocational education and draws parallels with the field of hospitality management which has experienced comparative debates about scope and meaning. Existing perspectives on the definition of facilities management are reviewed and examination is made as to how intellectual linkages may be established with broader issues in the development of non‐traditional fields of study. Concludes with consideration of one model for resolving the apparent tensions attendant on defining facilities management involving separation of the conceptual meaning of the terms “facility” and “facilities” from the set of practices that constitute “facilities management”.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Mona A. Clark and Roy C. Wood

This article looks at the outcome of a questionnaire designed to explore factors relevant to engendering consumer loyalty in restaurant choice. The sampling frame comprises people…

9061

Abstract

This article looks at the outcome of a questionnaire designed to explore factors relevant to engendering consumer loyalty in restaurant choice. The sampling frame comprises people with relatively homogeneous characteristics who dine out with some frequency. The overall objective was to question certain assumptions that have become current in academic discussions of consumer behaviour with particular relevance to consumer loyalty. Findings suggest that the quality and range or type of food are key determinants in consumer loyalty, but that the concept of “quality of food” offers a range of interpretations and thus requires more careful investigation. Additionally, the concept of the “meal experience” as a holistic abstraction in the consumer’s mind is called into question as a consequence of the analysis. Tangible rather than intangible factors are identified as being of greater importance in consumer loyalty.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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