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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1971

C. Simpson Smith

“Million fewer buy school meals”, “School meals fall angers M.P.s”, “School meals shock for Minister” — these are some of the headlines in the national press in recent…

Abstract

“Million fewer buy school meals”, “School meals fall angers M.P.s”, “School meals shock for Minister” — these are some of the headlines in the national press in recent months as a result of the increase in price of school meals from 1st April, 1971. Some claim that the lower numbers taking meals are partially seasonal but one must accept the fact that there has been a significant reduction varying in extent over the country. In my own authority from April to June, 1971 there was a decrease of 17 per cent in paid meals with a slight increase in free meals issued. Adjacent authorities quote a decrease of over 30 per cent.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Abigail L. Burgess and Valda W. Bunker

The present study compared the calculated nutritional content of midday meals eaten by primary schoolchildren (n=90, 45 boys, 45 girls, mean age 10.5±0.4 years), in the…

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Abstract

The present study compared the calculated nutritional content of midday meals eaten by primary schoolchildren (n=90, 45 boys, 45 girls, mean age 10.5±0.4 years), in the Portsmouth area, with the Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) published guidelines. Comp‐Eat 5 was used to determine the dietary content of children’s midday meals. Children’s lunchtime meals were not deficient in essential micronutrients; however, the macronutrient content of their diet differed significantly from the published guidelines. Data analysis also revealed that significant differences were evident between the macronutrient content of the two meal subgroups (food provided by the school, referred to as “school meals” and food brought from home, referred to as a “packed lunch”). In conclusion, several changes need to be made to midday meals, eaten by primary schoolchildren, before they will meet the CWT guidelines, and the two meal subgroups require separate solutions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

C.H. Tilston, K. Gregson, R.J. Neale and C. Tyne

As a result of a marketing study to evaluate the consumercharacteristics, service provision and degree of satisfaction withmeals‐on‐wheels, recipients were found to have…

Abstract

As a result of a marketing study to evaluate the consumer characteristics, service provision and degree of satisfaction with meals‐on‐wheels, recipients were found to have different characteristics from the general population, being on average, older, widowed, living alone, having little social contact, in poor health and not very mobile. A large majority received four or more meals per week; a hot meal was more popular than a cold one and the most popular time of delivery was around midday. A large majority of recipients were satisfied with the service.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Vedavalli Sachithananthan, Mohammad Buzgeia, Emberika Khalifa and Najwa Abdul Hamid

This paper aims to assess the nutritive value of Libyan airline meals in comparison with RDA.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the nutritive value of Libyan airline meals in comparison with RDA.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out using food samples collected from the catering department of Benina International Airport, Benghazi, Libya, for a period of two months. Different types of meals served for breakfast, lunch (beef meal, chicken meal and lamb meal) and snacks were collected in triplicate from the catering department of the airport prior to being loaded onto the aircraft. These samples were taken immediately to the university laboratory and weighed after removing the bones and separating the different dishes from the pre‐plated meal box. Rice, different vegetables and meat were weighed separately using a digital balance. Measuring cups were used to measure liquids. Chefs were consulted regarding the amount of different ingredients that went into the preparation of the different recipes to enable nutritive value computation using food composition tables. Finally the nutrient content of each meal and snack were compared with the RDA.

Findings

The results on the nutritive value of the dishes served for breakfast, lunch and snacks revealed higher amounts of energy, carbohydrates, saturated fat and sodium in comparison with the RDA in most of the meals, whereas the micronutrient content with respect to vitamins A, E and C, most B vitamins, and iron and calcium did not meet the RDA in respect of most of the meals.

Practical implications

The airline needs to look seriously into this issue and improve the micronutrient content of its meals, simultaneously reducing the total energy and sodium content and replacing the saturated fat present in the meals in the best interests of preventing health risks to frequent airline passengers.

Originality/value

The paper assesses the nutritional value of one airline's meals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Carrie H.S. Ruxton, Terry R. Kirk, Neville R. Belton and Michael A.M. Holmes

Presents new data comparing the nutrient content of school meals toproposed standards and showing the contribution of school meals to theoverall diet of seven to…

Abstract

Presents new data comparing the nutrient content of school meals to proposed standards and showing the contribution of school meals to the overall diet of seven to eight‐year‐old children. School meals contributed 24 per cent of daily energy intake and 17 to 35 per cent of daily nutrient intake but compared unfavourably to the proposed standards, being too low in certain micronutrients and too high in percentage energy from fat. However, since the overall diets of the children were deemed satisfactory, it was concluded that standards were not necessary for energy and the majority of nutrients. A targeted approach, recommending suitable levels for nutrients of particular concern, was suggested as a more viable option.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Benedetta Cappellini and Elizabeth Parsons

Purpose – In this chapter, we seek to explore the collective responsibilities undertaken by the family as a whole in maintaining familial bonds through meal consumption…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, we seek to explore the collective responsibilities undertaken by the family as a whole in maintaining familial bonds through meal consumption. We draw on work which examines the role of gift giving (Ruskola, 2005), sharing (Belk, 2010) and sacrifice (Miller, 1998) in consumption. We take an original approach which does not look at the family meal in isolation but rather focuses on the patterning of meals and the relationships between them.

Methodology – The ethnographic study draws on interviews with 18 families and follows up mealtime observations with 15 families.

Findings – The analysis reveals a mealtime patterning involving collective participation in saving (in the form of consuming ordinary and thrifty meals during the week) and spending (in consuming extraordinary meals at weekends). Even if in the women and mothers in the household tend to sacrifice themselves more than other family members, the consumption of thrifty or ordinary meals implies a process of sacrifice involving the entire family. In viewing the meal as gift, we also observe a process of reciprocity in operation with family members obliged to both share in, and contribute to, the meals that have been cooked for them.

Social implication – Our analysis reveals discordances between the aspirations of family members (which are arguably largely based on cultural ideals), and their everyday experiences of family mealtimes.

Originality/Value – The chapter show how these micro experiences of family mealtimes have implications for a macro understanding of the idealised and culturally loaded construct of the family meal.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Mónica Truninger and Ana Horta

Like many other countries, a reform of school meals policies has been implemented in Portugal, wherein nutritional and health criteria are considered in the design of the…

Abstract

Like many other countries, a reform of school meals policies has been implemented in Portugal, wherein nutritional and health criteria are considered in the design of the public plate. Given that a large literature on school meals focus on cities seen as sites for promising transformation regarding health, resilience and sustainability, it is pertinent to examine how these policies are being received in rural areas. Similar to other vulnerable regions in southern Europe, rural areas in Portugal have been affected by depopulation, the re-localisation of public services (e.g. schools, health centres and courts of justice) to larger conurbations, a drastic reduction of farming areas and its reconversion from sites of production to sites of consumption that thrive on tourism. While research on children’s attitudes, experiences and practices in rural areas had picked up the attention of social scientists, research on children’s relations and engagements with school meals in these areas does not abound. This chapter addresses three issues: first, how the catering staff and health professionals experience children’s engagements with school meals after the policy reform; second, how the discourses of the school staff and parents around the rural and gastro-idylls contrast with the reported food practices and experiences of everyday life, and third, how the multiple engagements of children with animals, plants and other nature conflict with or are juxtaposed to the images of the rural idyll. Drawing from focus groups material with children aged between 7 and 9 years old living in the rural hinterland of an inland medium-size city in Portugal, focus groups with parents and interviews with stakeholders (e.g. school and kitchen staff, local authorities, nutritionists and catering firms) the chapter aims at contributing to a broader understanding of children lived experiences with food consumption in rural contexts.

Details

Transforming the Rural
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-823-9

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

João Graça, Lisa Roque, David Guedes, Lúcia Campos, Monica Truninger, Cristina Godinho and Markus Vinnari

Recent reviews and reports have highlighted the need for integrated, context-specific efforts to enable sustainable food transitions. This study aimed to identify pathways…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent reviews and reports have highlighted the need for integrated, context-specific efforts to enable sustainable food transitions. This study aimed to identify pathways to promote healthier and more environmentally friendly food practices in school contexts, with a focus on increased plant-based eating.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a systemic approach with data collected from relevant stakeholders in an EU country (Portugal) at diverse levels of influence in the school meals system (i.e. proximal, intermediate, distal; from end-consumers to food providers, market actors, civil society organizations, and policy and decision-makers). Data from individual interviews (N = 33) were subjected to thematic analysis.

Findings

Meat-centric cultural perceptions of a ‘proper meal’ can be a socio-emotional barrier for sustainable food transitions in schools. Main pathways identified to unlock these transitions included: (1) Levering orientations toward ethical and environmentally beneficial consumption; (2) Improving and increasing the offer of plant-based meals; and (3) Mobilizing local communities and society.

Originality/value

The current findings suggest that promoting healthier and more environmentally friendly food practices in schools requires systemic, integrated approaches which focus on food consumption, food provision, and the broader political and sociocultural environment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2022

Xi Yu Leung, Xingyu Wang, Jamie Alexander Levitt and Lu Lu

This study aims to explore an emerging phenomenon – gourmet meal kits delivered to out-of-towners from iconic local restaurants. This study explores the interplay of goal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore an emerging phenomenon – gourmet meal kits delivered to out-of-towners from iconic local restaurants. This study explores the interplay of goal framing and basic needs and their effects on customer intentions. This study also examines the underlying mechanism of experience cocreation and the moderating effect of food involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a framework that combines the self-determination theory (SDT) and customer experience cocreation. Two online experimental studies involving 478 US consumers were conducted to examine the underlying mechanism of customers’ decision-making on purchasing gourmet meal kits (Study 1) and visiting destination restaurants after receiving the meal kit (Study 2).

Findings

Intrinsic goal-framing leads to stronger intentions to purchase gourmet meal kits and to visit destination restaurants that sell meal kits. In contrast, extrinsic goal-framing enhances the positive influence of perceived relatedness and competence on behavioral intentions. The effects of goal framing and basic needs on behavioral intentions are moderated by food involvement and mediated by experience cocreation to varying degrees.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is among the first to empirically examine an emerging business model – delivering restaurants’ food experiences to out-of-towners. The study also expands the application of the SDT by incorporating customer cocreation as the underlying mechanism.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Vitalii Mihailik, Oksana Vitriak, Inna Danyliuk, Mykola Valko, Olga Mamai, Tatyana Popovych, Anna Ryabinina, Lyudmila Vishnevskaya, Valentyna Burak and Ludmila Vognivenko

The purpose of this paper is to study the resilience and elastic properties of short pastry with the meals of soy, sunflower and milk thistle.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the resilience and elastic properties of short pastry with the meals of soy, sunflower and milk thistle.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent studies in the emerging food technologies of short pastry with use of meals were considered. Their focus on the improvement of the functional peculiarities of short pastry and benefits for people were the defining characteristics of the studies.

Findings

Model food compositions have been developed from soybean meal, sunflower meal and milk thistle for adding them to semi-finished short pastry products. The technology of short pastry confectionery made from short pastry with oilseed meal has been scientifically substantiated and developed. The chemical composition of shortbread cookies with the use of oilseed meal was calculated. The developed technology increased protein content by 2.5 times, cellulose content – by six times, significantly increased mineralization in the developed confectionery products. The content of calcium increased by 172.9 mg, selenium – by 13.06 mcg, iodine – by 2.76 mcg and vitamin E by 2.4 mg.

Practical implications

The developed technology of short pastry with a model composition of the meal can be used in practice. The use of a meal composition is a promising direction to improve the brittleness of short pastry products. The developed pastry products made from short pastry with added meal can be introduced into catering establishments as functional products with improved biological value.

Social implications

Developed pastry products can be used as functional products with improved biological value, which is important for people’s health and has positive effects on the human body.

Originality/value

The use of meals of soy, sunflower and milk thistle in short pastry increases its nutritional and biological value, which improves the impact on the human body. The developed pastry products can be introduced as functional products with improved biological value, which is important for the improvement of people’s health in different countries of the world.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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