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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Graham Turpin, Jeremy Clarke, Ruth Duffy and Roslyn Hope

Two years ago, we published within this journal a scoping article (Turpin et al, 2006) concerning the urgent need to review and enhance the workforce responsible for…

Abstract

Two years ago, we published within this journal a scoping article (Turpin et al, 2006) concerning the urgent need to review and enhance the workforce responsible for delivering psychological therapies to people seeking help for common mental health problems in primary care (London School of Economics, 2006). We estimated that the demand for such interventions, the service models that might deliver increased capacity for psychological treatments, the implications for workforce numbers and the impact that this would have on education and training. Much of the thinking that was adopted within the review was based on current development work around the mental health workforce led by the National Workforce Programme sponsored by the National Institute for Mental Health England (NIMHE) on New Ways of Working (NWW).The current paper reflects on the process and the added value that NWW has contributed to what is a radical new venture, which has been described by the lead evaluator of the pilot Improving Access for Psychological Therapies (IAPT) phase, Professor Glenys Parry, as 'the industrialisation of psychological therapies'. More specifically, it reviews the implementation of a national programme designated as IAPT, which was commissioned on the basis of the NWW work, and the evidence accrued from the IAPT national demonstration sites at Doncaster and Newham, together with the efforts of Lord Layard and the New Savoy Partnership.The first year implementation of IAPT is described, together with the lessons learned from the roll out. As the programme has developed, it has become important to ensure that clients also have a choice of evidence‐based interventions. NWW has provided a means to help practitioners come together from a range of therapeutic orientations and professions to contribute to this more diverse workforce. Finally, it is argued that NWW has been instrumental in helping managers and professions alike think more flexibly about service models and provision, and how to develop a new workforce competent to deliver such an innovative service.

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Roslyn Hope and John Allcock

Abstract

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Graham Turpin, Roslyn Hope, Ruth Duffy, Matt Fossey and James Seward

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems…

Abstract

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems, access to these services is still dramatically underdeveloped and uneven. Estimates of untreated problems such as depression and anxiety in primary care signal the extent of these problems and the scale of investment in new services, if these needs are to be adequately met in the future.The Department of Health's and the Care Services Improvement Partnership's (CSIP) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme sets out a framework and a series of co‐ordinated actions, including two national demonstration sites, to begin to address these issues in England.This paper examines the origins and policy drivers that have given rise to the IAPT programme, outlines the progress to date and specifically assesses the implications for the mental health workforce of this programme. Issues addressed include the workforce profiles of existing services, career frameworks for psychological therapists, the capacity of training providers to train new and existing staff in psychological therapies and the challenges implicit in devising a workforce delivery plan to support the IAPT programme.

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Ian Baguley, Jane Alexander, Hugh Middleton and Roslyn Hope

This position paper focuses on the current tensions and challenges of aligning inpatient care with innovations in mental health services. It argues that a cultural shift…

Abstract

This position paper focuses on the current tensions and challenges of aligning inpatient care with innovations in mental health services. It argues that a cultural shift is required within inpatient services. Obstacles to change including traditional perceptions of the role and responsibilities of the psychiatrist are discussed. The paper urges all staff working in acute care to reflect on the service that they provide, and to consider how the adoption of new ways of working might revolutionise the organisational culture. This cultural shift offers inpatient staff the opportunity to fully utilise their expertise. New ways of working may be perceived as a threat to existing roles and responsibilities or as an exciting opportunity for professional development with increased job satisfaction. Above all, the move to new ways of working, which is gathering pace throughout the UK, could offer service users1 a quality of care that meets their needs and expectations.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Ian Baguley

Abstract

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Elizabeth Parker

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Tony Lavender

This paper provides a review of the impact of three of the six work streams from the New Ways of Working for Applied Psychologists. The organisational change model of…

Abstract

This paper provides a review of the impact of three of the six work streams from the New Ways of Working for Applied Psychologists. The organisational change model of Beckhard and Harris (1989) is used to evaluate why the recommendations of the reports are being adopted at different speeds. Evidence that all are being used is presented. The paper starts with a restatement of the purpose of applied psychology that was developed during the work and is likely to stand the test of time.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Roslyn Kane

The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline the current debate on the delivery of sex education in the UK. The paper presents a brief summary of the recently published…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline the current debate on the delivery of sex education in the UK. The paper presents a brief summary of the recently published literature and details how the research papers in this special issue add to the current body of evidence.

Design/methodology/approach

This special issue introduces five new articles, including both original studies and reviews of the current literature. In response to a call for papers, five abstracts were selected and each author or group of authors invited to submit a fully developed paper, which was then subjected to blind peer review by two independent experts.

Findings

The brief summary of the recently published literature details how the research papers in this special issue add to the current body of evidence.

Originality/value

The dissemination of research evidence helps to ensure that practice is continually informed by emerging evidence and it is hoped that the publication of this special issue may contribute to this process.

Details

Health Education, vol. 108 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Jozica Johanna Kutin, Mike Reid and Roslyn Russell

This paper aims to investigate how economic abuse manifests in young adult relationships from the perspective of practice experts to inform the role of social marketing in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how economic abuse manifests in young adult relationships from the perspective of practice experts to inform the role of social marketing in economic abuse prevention. Practitioners were asked for their views on prevention strategies at the individual, relationship, community and societal levels.

Design methodology/approach

Twenty-four experts were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. Thematic analysis was undertaken.

Findings

Experts reported that young adults experienced economic exploitation, adverse economic entanglement and economic control. Young adults’ frame of reference was a challenge for practitioners. Experts believed that more work needed to be done to improve the financial literacy of young adults.

Research limitations/implications

Practitioner views provide one side of the story. A separate study has been established interviewing young adults to explore these issues further.

Practical implications

The authors argue that prevention and intervention strategies need to focus on young adults who are in their critical relationship formation stage. The identified attitudinal factors present a challenge to policy, prevention and service providers.

Originality/value

The authors shift the attention from service engaged women leaving violent relationships to young adults who have not sought assistance from community or domestic violence services. In doing so, they highlight the importance of the relationship formation phase. This paper raises the challenge for social marketers to consider appropriate prevention and intervention programmes for this cohort. Current and future campaigns and programmes need to be designed and evaluated with an economic abuse lens.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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