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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Rosanne L. Hartman and Emily G. Barber

While women perform as well as their male counterparts at work, women are drastically underrepresented in the onboarding process to senior leadership. The link between…

Abstract

Purpose

While women perform as well as their male counterparts at work, women are drastically underrepresented in the onboarding process to senior leadership. The link between occupational self-efficacy and the role it may play in how men and women make decisions about work has not been done. The purpose of this study is to examine potential differences of occupational self-efficacy, career aspirations and work engagement between women and men.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were created and sent out as emails and on social network sites including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Findings

Findings indicate that occupational self-efficacy has positive effect on career aspirations of women in the workplace. Further, there was no statistically significant difference between occupational self-efficacy and work engagement between men and women. However, men were found to have statistically significantly higher career aspirations than women do.

Research limitations/implications

While men and women do not differ in occupational self-efficacy or work engagement, men do have higher career aspirations than women do. Although women may believe they can accomplish challenging tasks in the workplace, it does not mean this belief is acted upon.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of occupational self-efficacy and its relation to career aspirations. Individuals who are high in occupational self-efficacy may set their own path in advancing within their career. However, individuals who are low or moderate in occupational self-efficacy may require further encouragement and development using additional resources as a catalyst for advancement guidance. While no differences were found between men and women in occupational self-efficacy, human resource practitioners should develop those individuals who are low or moderate in occupational self-efficacy with coaching, training and/or mentoring to build leadership capacity, increase self-efficacy and career-planning acumen.

Social implications

Men and women behave differently when seeking career advancement and in their career aspirations. For men, advancement is linked to performance whereas women use a multi-pronged approach focusing on preparing for career success and building role competency. Differences in strategy for advancement mean men will actively engage in behaviors to advance even when they do not have the knowledge or experience to perform in the new role. Conversely, women seek to feel competent in a work role prior to seeking it out. Finding ways to mentor women toward higher self-efficacy for their next career advancement will benefit organizations overall.

Originality/value

Research examining the role of occupational self-efficacy and its relation to career aspirations does not exist in comparing men and women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Rosanne L. Hartman and Alice L. Crume

The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of public forum mediation as a model for training in and improvement of conflict facilitation skills.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of public forum mediation as a model for training in and improvement of conflict facilitation skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The training strategy integrates continuous involvement of all the trainees through the use of a reflective team. The team and trainees focus on recognizing communication patterns used by individuals engaged in conflict.

Findings

Identifying communication patterns and strategies strengthens the trainees' ability to alter language use and nonverbal behavior during the facilitation process.

Originality/value

The use of public forum mediation strategies within the training context offers new and different ways for examining communication in the process of conflict facilitation.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper concentrates on identifying variations in the self-efficacy, career aspirations, and engagement of men and women inside workplaces, with particular focus on the impact of women’s self-efficacy levels. The results demonstrate that women tend to act less on any self-belief in their ability to progress in their career, and are more conservative than men in their self-assessment of their competencies before applying for more senior roles. Overall, women’s lower self-efficacy has the knock-on effect of dampening their career aspirations. Structural disadvantages for women can be addressed by HR teams actively involving them in networking and mentoring.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Sharyn McDonald

The purpose of this paper is to examine the formation of a cross-sector partnership in which a collaborative response addressed the issue of affordable housing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the formation of a cross-sector partnership in which a collaborative response addressed the issue of affordable housing and homelessness in Melbourne, Australia. Factors leading to the formation and evolution of the relationship reveal how social partnerships in the housing/construction industry can be formulated.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were held with representatives of the three sectors involved in an innovative social housing model, the Elizabeth Street Common Ground project. Supported with background documentation, interviews were coded and the results contrasted against theories pertaining to cross-sector collaboration.

Findings

Several factors contributed to the formation of this partnership, most notably the strong social imperative found within the organisational ethos of the participating organisations. The opportunity to replicate a well-trialled and successful model coincided with the desire among all partners to be part of the solution.

Originality/value

The results provide an insight into the ingredients pivotal to the formation of a successful multi-sector partnership. It highlights the value in sharing the best practice and the importance of networks when tackling major global problems such as affordable housing and homelessness.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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