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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

I.M. Jawahar, Bert Schreurs and Shawn J. Mohammed

In spite of the recent meta-analysis by Martin et al. (2016), we have very little insight about the theoretical mechanism explaining the leader–member…

1110

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the recent meta-analysis by Martin et al. (2016), we have very little insight about the theoretical mechanism explaining the leader–member exchange–counterproductive work behavior (LMX–CWB) relationship. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the purpose of this paper is to test if occupational self-efficacy functions as a mediating mechanism to explain the relationship between LMX quality and counterproductive performance directed toward the supervisor. In addition, based on the conservation of resources theory, the paper investigates if supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure acted as a second-stage moderator of this mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used two-wave time-lagged data from a sample of 189 high-tech professionals to test the hypotheses, controlling for age, sex, and trust.

Findings

The results of this paper showed that occupational self-efficacy carried the effect of LMX quality on counterproductive performance, but only for workers who have longer supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in proposing and testing a social cognitive mechanism to explain the relationship between LMX quality and counterproductive performance. As Johns (2017) advocated, the authors incorporated length of time, a contextual variable into this study by investigating supervisor–subordinate relationship tenure as moderating the proposed mediated relationship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Birgit Schyns and Sabine Sczesny

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between leadership‐relevant attributes and occupational self‐efficacy in management students. It is assumed that…

3609

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between leadership‐relevant attributes and occupational self‐efficacy in management students. It is assumed that leadership‐relevant attributes are related to high self‐efficacy beliefs.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present study management students from three different countries, namely Germany, Australia, and India, described to what degree they possess task‐ and person‐oriented leadership attributes and indicate their occupational self‐efficacy for their future profession. Data were analysed using regression analyses.

Findings

As expected, leadership‐relevant attributes were related to occupational self‐efficacy. Some support was found for the assumption that ratings of the importance of relevant attributes moderates the relationship between reported leadership‐relevant attributes and occupational self‐efficacy but only for task‐oriented attributes.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was small so that comparisons between subgroups were not possible. All data were self‐reported.

Practical implications

The results are relevant for career counselling. Looking at self‐description of individuals in terms of attributes relevant to their future job rather than working directly on their occupational self‐efficacy could be emphasised.

Originality/value

The study provides initial hints at the relationship between self‐description and occupational self‐efficacy in connection with future managers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Birgit Schyns and Karin Sanders

This study focuses on gender differences in the relationship between transformational leadership and leader's occupational self‐efficacy. The aim is to explain how female…

4081

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on gender differences in the relationship between transformational leadership and leader's occupational self‐efficacy. The aim is to explain how female and male leaders develop their self‐efficacy. This knowledge is important for leaders as well as organizations (e.g. human resources departments).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 58 leaders were asked to indicate their transformational leadership as well as their occupational self‐efficacy, and 113 followers to indicate these leaders' transformational leadership. Hypotheses were examined using regression analyses.

Findings

We found no significant relationship between self‐rated transformational leadership and occupational self‐efficacy for women, although we did find a positive relationship for men. No interaction effect with respect to leaders' occupational self‐efficacy could be found between leaders' gender and follower‐rated transformational leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Whereas the relationship between transformational leadership and occupational self‐efficacy was examined for men and women, we could not examine the processes that lead to the differences.

Practical implications

Knowing that female and male leaders differ in the relationship between transformational leadership and occupational self‐efficacy can help organizations to seek ways to build up their occupational self‐efficacy. This is especially important when considering that occupational self‐efficacy is related to performance in organizations.

Originality/value

The paper employs both leader and follower evaluations on leaders' transformational leadership to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and occupational self‐efficacy. The paper sheds light on the different processes involved in establishing occupational self‐efficacy.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Rosanne L. Hartman and Emily G. Barber

While women perform as well as their male counterparts at work, women are drastically underrepresented in the onboarding process to senior leadership. The link between…

5696

Abstract

Purpose

While women perform as well as their male counterparts at work, women are drastically underrepresented in the onboarding process to senior leadership. The link between occupational self-efficacy and the role it may play in how men and women make decisions about work has not been done. The purpose of this study is to examine potential differences of occupational self-efficacy, career aspirations and work engagement between women and men.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were created and sent out as emails and on social network sites including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Findings

Findings indicate that occupational self-efficacy has positive effect on career aspirations of women in the workplace. Further, there was no statistically significant difference between occupational self-efficacy and work engagement between men and women. However, men were found to have statistically significantly higher career aspirations than women do.

Research limitations/implications

While men and women do not differ in occupational self-efficacy or work engagement, men do have higher career aspirations than women do. Although women may believe they can accomplish challenging tasks in the workplace, it does not mean this belief is acted upon.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of occupational self-efficacy and its relation to career aspirations. Individuals who are high in occupational self-efficacy may set their own path in advancing within their career. However, individuals who are low or moderate in occupational self-efficacy may require further encouragement and development using additional resources as a catalyst for advancement guidance. While no differences were found between men and women in occupational self-efficacy, human resource practitioners should develop those individuals who are low or moderate in occupational self-efficacy with coaching, training and/or mentoring to build leadership capacity, increase self-efficacy and career-planning acumen.

Social implications

Men and women behave differently when seeking career advancement and in their career aspirations. For men, advancement is linked to performance whereas women use a multi-pronged approach focusing on preparing for career success and building role competency. Differences in strategy for advancement mean men will actively engage in behaviors to advance even when they do not have the knowledge or experience to perform in the new role. Conversely, women seek to feel competent in a work role prior to seeking it out. Finding ways to mentor women toward higher self-efficacy for their next career advancement will benefit organizations overall.

Originality/value

Research examining the role of occupational self-efficacy and its relation to career aspirations does not exist in comparing men and women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Rita Chiesa, Stefano Toderi, Paola Dordoni, Kene Henkens, Elena Maria Fiabane and Ilaria Setti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, the authors intend to test the…

2828

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, the authors intend to test the measurement invariance of Henkens’s (2005) age stereotypes scale across two age group, respectively, under 50 and 50 years and older. Then, the moderator role of age groups in the relationship between age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey involved a large sample of 4,667 Italian bank sector’s employees.

Findings

The results show the invariance of the three dimensional structure of organizational stereotypes towards older workers scale: productivity, reliability and adaptability. Furthermore, the moderation is confirmed: the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy is significant only for older respondents.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should aim to replicate the findings with longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

The study suggests the importance to emphasize the positive characteristics of older workers and to reduce the presence of negative age stereotypes in the workplace, especially in order to foster the occupational self-efficacy of older workers.

Originality/value

The findings are especially relevant in view of the lack of evidence about the relationship between age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Tracy F.H. Chang

This study develops a social psychological model to account for women’s gender‐typed occupational mobility. The model delineates that occupational gender composition…

2337

Abstract

This study develops a social psychological model to account for women’s gender‐typed occupational mobility. The model delineates that occupational gender composition affects women’s psychological experience (experience of sex discrimination, self‐efficacy, and gender role ideology), and that this psychological experience, in turn, contributes to their mobility between male‐dominated and female‐dominated occupations. Using the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) of Young Women data, the study finds that occupational gender composition affects women’s report of experience of sex discrimination but not self‐efficacy or gender role ideology. Self‐efficacy contributes to women’s gender‐typed occupational mobility, but experience of sex discrimination and gender role ideology do not. The direction for future research is discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Cherine Jneid

Software industry, one of the most knowledge-intensive industries, in Brazil has increased opportunities of evolution. Its competitive advantage relies on the efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

Software industry, one of the most knowledge-intensive industries, in Brazil has increased opportunities of evolution. Its competitive advantage relies on the efficiency of the organizational knowledge management, but the knowledge hiding, its antecedents and moderators are still understudied. This study seeks to identify a new antecedent to knowledge hiding, such the occupational stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The author focused on the moderating effect of social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy in the relationship between occupational stress and knowledge hiding in software industry in Brazil. The author collected data from 189 software industry Brazilian employees in 30 firms using a time-lagged research design.

Findings

This study demonstrated that employees with high levels of social self-efficacy (SSE) and emotional self-efficacy (ESE) or both have more tendency to engage on knowledge hiding behavior comparing to their colleagues with low SSE and ESE. This study showed that SSE and ESE related positively to rationalized hiding, evasive hiding and playing dumb.

Originality/value

The author’s main contribution relies on the finding related to the joint role of social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy on engaging employees under occupational stress conditions in knowledge hiding behaviors.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2022

Talat Islam, Iram Zahra, Saif Ur Rehman and Saqib Jamil

Innovation has become a necessity for the information technology (IT) sector, especially during COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation has become a necessity for the information technology (IT) sector, especially during COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how knowledge sharing affects employees’ innovative work behavior (IWB). Specifically, the study examined occupational self-efficacy (as mediating mechanism) and entrepreneurial leadership (as boundary condition) to encourage IWB.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used social media platforms to collect data from 270 employees working in the IT sector through “google forms” on convenience basis between March and August, 2021. The study applied structural equation modeling in two stages to examine the measurement model (for uni-dimensionality) and the structural model (for hypotheses testing).

Findings

The study noted that knowledge sharing positively affects employees’ IWB and occupational self-efficacy positively explains this association. In addition, employees’ perception of entrepreneurial leadership strengthens the association between knowledge sharing and IWB.

Research limitations/implications

The study collected data from a developing country during COVID-19 by using a cross-sectional design that may restrict causality. However, the findings suggest the management not only encourages knowledge sharing environment but also engages employees in various training that motivate them to experiment with new ideas and techniques.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing literature on knowledge sharing and IWB by exploring occupational self-efficacy as mediating mechanism and entrepreneurial leadership as a boundary condition.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2022

Lama Blaique, Ashly Pinnington and Hazem Aldabbas

Despite an evident increase in the number of women joining Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) majors at universities, the recruitment and retainment…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite an evident increase in the number of women joining Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) majors at universities, the recruitment and retainment of women in STEM occupations continue to be a substantial challenge. The aim of this research is to investigate several individual and contextual factors that could increase the representation of women in STEM fields.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors report the results of a questionnaire survey of women (n = 375) working in STEM industries in the Middle East and North Africa region who have or had a mentor during their careers. Structural equation modelling is used to examine the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that both mentoring and coping self-efficacy positively influence affective occupational commitment. Coping self-efficacy is also found to partially mediate the relationship between mentoring and affective occupational commitment.

Practical implications

The authors recommend that researchers and practitioners give more attention to the contextual factors such as mentoring and its contribution to the coping self-efficacy and affective occupational commitment of employees in STEM occupations.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors investigate individual and contextual factors that have potential to enhance women's occupational commitment in STEM industries based on the Career Self-Management Model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Lama Blaique, Ashly H. Pinnington, Husam-Aldin Al-Malkawi and Hazem Aldabbas

Despite continuing under-representation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the literature still falls short on identifying and…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite continuing under-representation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the literature still falls short on identifying and explaining the factors that could contribute to women's persistence and commitment. The purpose of this research is to identify cognitive and behavioral factors that will support the occupational commitment of women in STEM.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative analysis is based on a questionnaire survey of 375 women working in STEM in the Middle East region. Multiple regression and bootstrapping methods were employed in the analysis of the data.

Findings

The results support the following hypotheses: personal skills development has a positive impact on affective occupational commitment and coping self-efficacy, and coping self-efficacy mediates the relationship between personal skills development and affective occupational commitment.

Originality/value

This study adds insights on the dynamic approaches adopted by women in STEM fields to overcome occupational career challenges by testing several internal drivers, coping self-efficacy and personal learning.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000