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1 – 10 of 32
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2017

Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Rory Mulcahy, Jo-Anne Little and Tim Swinton

Designing a social marketing intervention for low-income earners requires an understanding of the key motivations. As part of the Low-Income Earner Energy Efficiency Programme…

Abstract

Purpose

Designing a social marketing intervention for low-income earners requires an understanding of the key motivations. As part of the Low-Income Earner Energy Efficiency Programme, this study investigates the key factors that influence energy behaviours amongst Australian young low-income earners as part of the Reduce Your Juice social marketing programme. The authors also investigate the effect of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 753 low-income renters was conducted using validated measures. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The two factors that had the highest influence on intentions for energy-saving behaviours was the “mind” factor of self-efficacy and “money” factor of price concern. There were gender differences in the effect of bill control and price concern on intentions for different energy efficiency behaviours.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance on the factors to emphasise when designing an energy efficiency programme for low-income earners.

Social implications

This study provides evidence for different motivations amongst low-income earners for energy efficiency programmes and that a “one size fits all” approach may not be effective.

Originality/value

While there is high interest in the public sector for motivating young-adult low-income earners to change their energy behaviours, little is known about the key factors that motivate intentions to engage in these behaviours.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Afshin Tanouri, Rory Mulcahy and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to test a hierarchical model with interrelationships between social support, value and brand equity to examine the effect of a…

1323

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to test a hierarchical model with interrelationships between social support, value and brand equity to examine the effect of a transformative gamification service on users’ well-being behaviors; and second, to demonstrate the usefulness of brand equity to measure social behavior brands encouraged via transformative gamification services.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected (n=351) via users of a transformative gamification service delivered via mobile in Iran. Structural equation modeling was used to test the model.

Findings

The results revealed that the hierarchical model had a superior fit to the data over rival models measuring constructs at lower orders. The results also reveal that value mediates the relationship between social support and brand equity for social behavior.

Originality/value

This is the first study to hierarchically test a model for transformative gamification services. Furthermore, it begins to shed light on the antecedents of value created within transformative gamification services, which to date have not been thoroughly explored. Finally, the study demonstrates brand equity is applicable beyond commercial campaigns and services and can be used to measure social (well-being) behaviors.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Rory Francis Mulcahy, Nadia Zainuddin and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

This study aims to investigate the use of gamification and serious games as transformative technologies that encourage health and well-being behaviors. The purpose of this paper…

1823

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the use of gamification and serious games as transformative technologies that encourage health and well-being behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the transformative value that can be created by gamified apps and serious games and the role involvement plays between transformative value and desired outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Four gamified apps/serious games were examined in the study, with data collected from N = 497 participants. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results revealed that gamified apps and serious games can create three transformative value dimensions – knowledge, distraction, and simulation – which can have direct and indirect effects on desired outcomes. Examination of competing models revealed involvement plays a mediating rather than a moderating role for gamification and serious games for well-being.

Originality/value

This research contributes greater understanding of how technology can be leveraged to deliver transformative gamification services. It demonstrates the multiple transformative value dimensions that can be created by gamified apps and serious games, which assist the performance of well-being behaviors and which have yet to be theorized or empirically examined. The study also establishes the mediating rather than the moderating role of involvement in gamification and serious games, as called for in the literature.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

David Fleischman, Popi Sotiriadou, Rory Mulcahy, Bridie Kean and Rubiana Lopes Cury

This paper aims to investigate capitalization support, an alternative perspective for theorizing social support in-service settings. In the service setting of the student-athlete…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate capitalization support, an alternative perspective for theorizing social support in-service settings. In the service setting of the student-athlete experience, the relationships between capitalization support service dimensions (i.e. the academic, athletic, self-development and place dimensions), well-being and sports performance are examined through a transformative sport service research (TSSR) lens, a newly introduced form of transformative service research (TSR).

Design/methodology/approach

Data from an online survey of Australian student-athletes (n = 867) is examined using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results support the theorized service dimensions of capitalization support, indicating their validity and relevance to the student-athlete experience. Further, the results demonstrate that all capitalization support dimensions except athletic support (i.e. academic support, place support and self-development support), have a direct effect on well-being and an indirect effect on sports performance.

Originality/value

This research is unique for several reasons. First, it introduces a new perspective, capitalization support, to theorizing about social support in services. Second, it is one of the first studies in both TSR and TSSR to empirically test and demonstrate a relationship between support services, well-being and performance in a single study. Insight into how to design services to optimize well-being in relation to other service objectives like performance thus emerges.

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2018

Timo Dietrich, Rory Mulcahy and Kathy Knox

There is growing evidence that serious games can be an effective tool in social marketing programmes. Although multiple (serious) game attribute frameworks exist, there is limited…

1193

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing evidence that serious games can be an effective tool in social marketing programmes. Although multiple (serious) game attribute frameworks exist, there is limited knowledge about which game attributes are applicable for sensitive social marketing issues. This research aims to fill this gap by compiling a taxonomy of game attributes for serious games based on the existing literature and investigating which of the game attributes users prefer in the context of an alcohol programme targeted at adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

Three serious games were administered to a sample of adolescents as part of a larger trial. Game feedback data from 640 participants are coded and compared using the synthesised classification taxonomy of reward-based and meaningful game attributes.

Findings

Meaningful game attributes are more frequently preferred than reward game attributes across all three serious games.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined serious games targeting only one specific context (alcohol) in one market segment (Australian adolescents) on one gaming platform (online).

Practical implications

This study proposes that meaningful game attributes are more important than reward game attributes when designing serious games for (alcohol) social marketing programmes. Nevertheless, social marketers must also recognise that reward-based game attributes are important attributes, as they are essential for making and motivating gameplay.

Originality/value

This research is the first social marketing study that provides insight into game attributes which are preferred by users of serious games or gamified technology in social marketing programmes.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Rory Francis Mulcahy, Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Nadia Zainuddin and Kerri-Ann Kuhn

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to extend transformative service and social marketing practitioners’ and academics’ understanding of how gamification and serious…

2221

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to extend transformative service and social marketing practitioners’ and academics’ understanding of how gamification and serious m-games are designed, and second, to model the effects of game design elements on key transformative service and social marketing outcomes, satisfaction, knowledge, and behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a two-study, mixed-method research design, encompassing focus groups (n=21) and online surveys (n=497), using four current marketplace serious m-games. Study 1 was qualitative and the data were analysed in two cycles using an inductive and deductive approach. Study 2 was quantitative and the data were analysed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

The qualitative results of Study 1 discovered a framework of five game design elements for serious m-games. In Study 2, a conceptual model and hypothesised relationships were tested at a full sample level and by each serious m-game. Results show different significant relationships for each serious m-game and moderate to high levels of explanation for satisfaction and knowledge, and low to high levels of explained variance for behavioural intentions. The findings are therefore not only robust across four different serious m-games, but also demonstrate the nuances of the relationships.

Originality/value

This research contributes to two service research priorities: leveraging technology to advance services, and improving well-being through transformative services. This research demonstrates that gamification through serious m-games is one form of technology that can be designed to create a satisfying and knowledge-creating service experience, which can also influence intentions to perform health and well-being behaviours.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Maria M. Raciti, Rory Mulcahy and Stephan Dahl

400

Abstract

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Rory Francis Mulcahy, Ryan McAndrew, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Dawn Iacobucci

Marketers have begun to investigate the potential of gamification for influencing consumer behavior by using game design elements in realms varying from branding, retail, sales…

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Abstract

Purpose

Marketers have begun to investigate the potential of gamification for influencing consumer behavior by using game design elements in realms varying from branding, retail, sales and health services. Marketers have also begun to explore consumer behavior in sustainability. This paper aims to provide contributions to build on both literatures.

Design/methodology/approach

This research tests gamification principles in a large field study on real consumers that includes data from pre-post surveys, gamified app analytics and household energy meters. The data are analyzed using ANOVA’s and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings demonstrate: gamification significantly enhanced consumers’ knowledge, attitudes, behavioral intentions and realized bill savings compared to a control group; reward-based game design elements including points, badges and other rewards contribute to enhancing sustainable behavior outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Future research in settings outside of sustainability may extend upon the findings of the current research to further understanding the impact of reward-based game design elements in marketing.

Practical implications

The findings have important practical implications for how organizations might use serious games to promote sustainable and other desirable behavior. In particular, how reward-based game design elements, points, trophies and badges, can be used to create a chain of relationships that leads to reduced electricity consumption.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills the need to understand if the impact of gamification extends outside of controlled environments and into the field. Further, it demonstrates how reward-based game design elements contribute to consumers changing their behavior, a relationship that is not yet thoroughly understood in the marketing literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Rebekah Russell–Bennett, Rory Mulcahy, Kate Letheren, Ryan McAndrew and Uwe Dulleck

A transformative service aims to improve wellbeing; however, current approaches have an implicit assumption that all wellbeing dimensions are equal and more dimensions led to…

1617

Abstract

Purpose

A transformative service aims to improve wellbeing; however, current approaches have an implicit assumption that all wellbeing dimensions are equal and more dimensions led to higher wellbeing. The purpose of this paper is to present evidence for a new framework that identifies the paradox of competing wellbeing dimensions for both the individual and others in society – the transformative service paradox (TSP).

Design/methodology/approach

Data is drawn from a mixed-method approach using qualitative (interviews) and quantitative data (lab experiment) in an electricity service context. The first study involves 45 household interviews (n = 118) and deals with the nature of trade-offs at the individual level to establish the concept of the TSP. The second study uses a behavioral economics laboratory experiment (n = 110) to test the self vs. other nature of the trade-off in day-to-day use of electricity.

Findings

The interviews and experiment identified that temporal (now vs. future) and beneficiary-level factors explain why individuals make wellbeing trade-offs for the transformative service of electricity. The laboratory experiment showed that when the future implication of the trade-off is made salient, consumers are more willing to forego physical wellbeing for environmental wellbeing, whereas when the “now” implication is more salient consumers forego financial wellbeing for physical wellbeing.

Originality/value

This research introduces the term “Transformative Service Paradox” and identifies two factors that explain why consumers make wellbeing trade-offs at the individual level and at the societal level; temporal (now vs. future) and wellbeing beneficiary.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Aimee Riedel, Rory Mulcahy, Amanda Beatson and Byron Keating

This paper aims to report on the first comprehensive, social marketing systematic review of interventions targeting illicit drug use by young adults.

5657

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the first comprehensive, social marketing systematic review of interventions targeting illicit drug use by young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 3,169 papers were screened, with 20 relevant empirical studies meeting the eligibility criteria for the systematic review. These were analysed according to Andreasen’s (2002) and NSMC’s (2006) social marketing benchmarks.

Findings

The findings provide evidence regarding the efficacy of behavioural and clinical interventions targeting individuals and groups, including motivational, life skills training, cognitive behavioural therapy, comprehensive health and social risk assessments and buprenorphine treatment interventions. Further, results evidence that there is yet to be an intervention which has implemented the full marketing mix, and limited studies have used the social marketing benchmarks of exchange and competition.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to conduct a comprehensive systematic review and provide key recommendations outlining the potential for social marketing to support the improved uptake and efficacy of interventions. A research agenda is also put forward to direct future social marketing scholarship in the area of young adult drug interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

1 – 10 of 32