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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Nigel Lambert and Roger Fenwick

Legumes have worldwide improtanceNigel Lambert PhD and Roger FenwickPhD write about and organisation whichhas been set up to improve theseprotain rich foods

Abstract

Legumes have worldwide improtance Nigel Lambert PhD and Roger Fenwick PhD write about and organisation which has been set up to improve these protain rich foods

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Roger Fenwick, K.R. Price and I.T. Johnson

The flatulent effect of beans is universally known and has, undoubtedly, been a source of discomfort throughout history. It has even been proposed as an explanation for…

Abstract

The flatulent effect of beans is universally known and has, undoubtedly, been a source of discomfort throughout history. It has even been proposed as an explanation for Pythagoras' otherwise puzzling ban on the eating of beans by the members of the philosophical school which he founded in Ancient Greece. It would be incorrect to imagine, however, that the problem is now of little social concern beyond the school playground, within which it is the topic of countless jokes and speculations.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 87 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Caralyn Ridout, Keith Price and Roger Fenwick

The grain, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), like tomatoes, maize, Phaseolus beans and potatoes, was a staple food of the Inca peoples. Unlike these other crops, however…

Abstract

The grain, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), like tomatoes, maize, Phaseolus beans and potatoes, was a staple food of the Inca peoples. Unlike these other crops, however, quinoa did not attain global importance following the Spanish conquest. One reason which has been advanced to explain this is the presence in the outer layers of the grain of bitter and toxic saponins (see below) which must be removed before processing or cooking. Traditionally this was done by washing or steeping in water and it is obvious this is much less practicable in cloudy, European climates where subsequent drying is difficult, if not impossible.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 90 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Roger Fenwick

In recent years much concern has been expressed about the occurrence and biological consequences of exogenous chemicals — the contaminants, residues and additives in our…

Abstract

In recent years much concern has been expressed about the occurrence and biological consequences of exogenous chemicals — the contaminants, residues and additives in our food. In contrast, much less attention has been paid to naturally occurring chemicals in our diet and to their possibile toxicity.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 87 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

A review of the research areas of faculty members and the teaching programmes of this institution.

Abstract

A review of the research areas of faculty members and the teaching programmes of this institution.

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Management Research News, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

John Rule, Roger Dunston and Nicky Solomon

This paper aims to provide an account of learning and change in the redesign of a primary health-care initiative in a large metropolitan city in Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an account of learning and change in the redesign of a primary health-care initiative in a large metropolitan city in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on research exploring the place and role of learning in the re-making of health professional practices in a major New South Wales Government health reform called HealthOne. The analysis and findings presented here make reference to data drawn from a longitudinal ethnographic study (2011-2014) conducted by an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from the University of Technology Sydney. Socio-material and practice-based approaches for understanding learning are used in working with the data.

Findings

There were substantial changes in professional practice, especially in the role of the General Practice Liaison Nurse. Changes, and the learning connected to the changes, were dynamically influenced by the macro-context. HealthOne was a reform initiative with a strong focus on achieving health service redesign and a consistent focus on staff developing new ways of thinking and operating. Although learning was often discussed, it was, for the most part, expressed in general terms, and there was a lack of a formal and well-developed approach to learning collectively and individually.

Originality/value

This research paper will inform future attempts at service redesign in community and primary health contexts and provides a site-specific examination of workplace learning in a context of rapid change.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Shahrzad Amirani and Roger Gates

Store image has long been recognized as a determinant of businesssuccess and has been used as a positioning and differentiation tool.Over the years, the retail image…

Abstract

Store image has long been recognized as a determinant of business success and has been used as a positioning and differentiation tool. Over the years, the retail image research stream has witnessed numerous conceptual and operational definitions, However, despite the long‐term fascination of researchers with this construct, substantial “noise” is evident in store image research. Provides an overview of the store image literature and illustrates the usefulness of an attribute‐anchored conjoint methodology for operationalizing this construct.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1947

During the year 5,399 samples were taken under the Food and Drugs Act. Of these, 398 (7·4 per cent.) were against, as adulterated, below standard, or incorrectly labelled…

Abstract

During the year 5,399 samples were taken under the Food and Drugs Act. Of these, 398 (7·4 per cent.) were against, as adulterated, below standard, or incorrectly labelled. The remainder, 1,173 samples, included water, 602, pasteurized milk 400—eight of these indicated a slight, technical error in preparation, and three “gross error.” Soot gauges 24. The total number of milk samples examined during the year was 2,844—excluding those just mentioned. Of these, 9·9 per cent. were found to be adulterated. This percentage of adulteration or for non‐compliance with the legal limit of 8·5 per cent. non‐fatty solids and 3 per cent. is the highest for six years. It is remarked that the freezing point test shows that the milks were naturally low in solids not fat. This would seem to be due to the cumulative effect during the last few years of feeding‐stuffs shortage, though the average annual composition of samples taken has varied but little during the war years and compares favourably with pre‐war milks. The Public Analyst points out that 9·9 per cent. does not mean that 9·9 per cent. of the Birmingham milk is adulterated, as more than one sample was taken from vendors whose milk was under suspicion. Tables given show that the average composition for all milks and farmers' milk were identical. The prosecutions call for no very extended comment. The milk cooler—that great source of surprises—was in each case found to be in working order. The cows were in “good heart.” In one case the cowman was fined £3 for adding water. The farmer, for not exercising due diligence under Section 83 of the Food and Drugs Act, was fined £20 on each of six summonses issued against him, £120 in all, with £1 costs. The farmer seems to have been, and probably still is, a hopeless case. He had been fined £30 and costs in 1940, and £580 with £46 costs in 1942. About £750 in all! We suppose he still carries on, but what about the consumers! Baking powder and self‐raising flour were reported against for carbon dioxide deficiency. This was apparently due to the use of old stock. The vendors were cautioned. Old stock—at least we suppose age to be the explanation—is also distinguished in other ways: cheese, infested with mites, unfit for consumption; cocoa, mouldy, and paper wrapper contained book lice; coffee, contained a mass of cobwebs; lentils, grubs and mite eggs; and so on. The immediate origin of another dealer's wrapping paper would seem to have been the coal scuttle since paper, lard and butter were speckled with coal particles. The Veterinary Inspector was requested to visit all the places of sale which would seem to be half‐way houses to the hospital for the consumer. An interesting point is raised in the matter of a sample labelled “lemon flavour.” This delicacy consisted of a 6 per cent. solution of citric acid, containing in suspension a small amount of starchy matter to make it look like lemon juice. It was flavoured with oil of lemon and contained 118 parts per million of sulphur dioxide. As the Preservatives Regulations forbid the introduction of sulphur dioxide into an article of this kind the firm was written, and replied that they considered the article to be “an unsweetened cordial, and that therefore sulphur dioxide was allowed up to 600 parts per million” (italics ours). The relevant Section referred to states: “Non‐alcoholic wines, cordials and fruit juices, sweetened and unsweetened, 350 (not 600) parts per million sulphur dioxide or 600 parts per million benzoic acid.” The Public Analyst points out that in the final report of the Departmental Committee on the use of preservatives in foods (1924) a comma appears after the word cordials in the above (italics ours) “making it clear that the words sweetened or unsweetened refer only to fruit juices, and that no such article as an unsweetened cordial is recognised. Such a description is a contradiction in terms, for the essential ingredient of a non‐alcoholic cordial is sugar.” The Ministry of Food was written and their attention called to the apparent omission of the comma in the published text of the Preservatives Regulations, and drawing attention to the fact that whether the omission were unintentional or deliberate the result was to permit the use of preservative in an instance where the committee of experts appointed do not choose to make such a recommendation. The Ministry in their reply did not reply to this question, but said the firm had no licence to manufacture the flavouring but asked for particulars of sale. The soot gauges show on the whole a steady decline in atmospheric smoke pollution. The average amount of insoluble matter expressed in tons per square mile per month. The Central Station figures are 13·5 in 1945. It was 37·6 in 1936. The West Heath Station 4·9 in 1945. It was 10·9 in 1938. Satisfactory as far as the reduction in atmospheric pollution goes. May it continue.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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