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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2023

Richard Kwame Adom, Mulala Danny Simatele, Dillip Kumar Das, Kalumba Ahmed Mukalazi, Mazinyo Sonwabo, Lindelani Mudau, Mikateko Sithole, Serge Kubanza, Coleen Vogel and Leocadia Zhou

Globally, climate change governance continues to be a significant challenge to policymakers, environmentalists and politicians despite international summits, conferences and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Globally, climate change governance continues to be a significant challenge to policymakers, environmentalists and politicians despite international summits, conferences and programmes designed to find sustainable solutions to the climate change crises. Climate change continues to be viewed primarily as a challenge for the future, whereas many leaders and administrators globally regard it as an environmental issue rather than a challenge that encompasses all aspects of life. In South Africa, these misleading perceptions of climate change continue to prevail both at national and local levels. The government and private organisations do not attach the required levels of urgency needed to address the climate change crisis. While numerous policies and institutions have been established to address these challenges, they lack financial backing, coordination and synergy that cut across the broad objectives of environmental, social and economic agendas. Additionally, weak, eroding trust and manipulating of institutions continue to hinder effective policy implementation and focus-driven governance. This paper aims to explore the structural and governance weaknesses of climate change administration in the KwaZulu-Natal province and South Africa in general.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used extensive literature reviews and a triangulated approach to investigate the weaknesses of the current governance structure in the context of institutional and capacity constraints.

Findings

The findings uncovered that most institutions and organisations mandated to address climate change challenges operate in silos, lack required investment and capacity and have weak accountability mechanisms with a shallow understanding of climate change governance.

Originality/value

This paper recommends better coordination between national, provincial and local governments as well as the private sector towards climate change activities and capacity to ensure that climate change actions are effectively implemented.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2022

Kwame Adom, Louis Numelio Tettey and George Acheampong

Relationship marketing (RM) has rarely been applied to micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) in the informal economy (IE). Thus, this study aims to explore the RM…

Abstract

Purpose

Relationship marketing (RM) has rarely been applied to micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) in the informal economy (IE). Thus, this study aims to explore the RM strategy of service rendering micro-enterprises in the IE of a sub-Saharan African country like Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative research approach using a multiple case study design, semi-structured interview and a random sampling technique to sample 15 micro-enterprises. Thereafter, the case was analysed thematically.

Findings

Results show that micro-enterprises in the IE engage in multiple dimensions of RM in their line of business. Also, micro-enterprises in the IE perceived RM as customer care and somewhat their standard of RM benefits measurement are different from those firms in the formal sector. Furthermore, micro-enterprises in the IE face challenges such as high resource commitment, harassment and the technological gap in practising their RM strategy.

Practical implications

MSMEs in the IE should develop a framework to minimise the shortfall of the challenges associated with RM implementation for business continuity and growth because customers are the lifeblood of the business.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first known study that looks at RM practices of MSMEs in the IE. It has thrown light on the understudied subject of RM in MSMEs. For micro-enterprises operating in the Ghanaian IE, the benefits to be derived from practising RM are rewarding. The adopted qualitative methodology has provided an in-depth insight into a vital area for both academics and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2023

Abdallah Abdul-Rahaman, Kwame Adom and Ibn Kailan Abdul-Hamid

Entrepreneurial education is gaining traction in Ghana. The purpose of this chapter was to assess the influences of social enterprises in promoting entrepreneurial education…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial education is gaining traction in Ghana. The purpose of this chapter was to assess the influences of social enterprises in promoting entrepreneurial education, using Ghanaian social enterprises as a case study. The study adopted a qualitative research approach. A multiple case study analysis examined the influences of social enterprises in Ghana. Four in-depth qualitative case studies offer insight into social enterprise practices. Sustainability, innovation, control and employment issues stand out as key effects of Ghanaian social enterprise practices. The social practice theory framework is used to draw the linkages of the structure and agency relationships. Sustainability emerges as the most dominant impact of social enterprise practice followed by innovation, control and employment. These four descriptive terms summarise the universal effects of Ghanaian social enterprises' practices. The study identifies and assesses the role of social enterprises in social entrepreneurial education in addressing social ills and environmental challenges facing Ghana. The emphasis placed on each of the identified four constructs describes the plausible roles of Ghana's social enterprises in achieving productive entrepreneurship through entrepreneurship education. The result shows the pursuit of multiple practices is a common feature of social enterprises. The limitations of the study stem from methodological approach as it is qualitative approach bias and a single country case. Likewise, the subjectivities of the samples direct the results of the study. The study draws the attention of stakeholders and policymakers to the goodwill of social entrepreneurship education in Ghana. Many studies have been conducted on entrepreneurial education in the contextual setting of this study. This present study focused on the practices of social enterprises in Ghana that influences entrepreneurial education.

Details

Delivering Entrepreneurship Education in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-326-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2023

Raphael Kanyire Seidu, Benjamin Eghan, Emmanuel Abankwah Ofori, George Kwame Fobiri, Alex Osei Afriyie and Richard Acquaye

The purpose of this study is to investigate the physical, ultraviolet (UV), colour appearance and colour fastness properties of selected fabrics dyed with natural dyes from Daboya…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the physical, ultraviolet (UV), colour appearance and colour fastness properties of selected fabrics dyed with natural dyes from Daboya and Ntonso communities of Ghana. The study further highlights the rich cultural heritage of traditional dyeing from these two communities. Craftsmen in West Africa especially Ghana, have sustained the traditional dyeing methods to produce textile products for consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, two sample fabrics were purchased from craftsmen at Ntonso and Daboya communities in Ghana. These fabrics were analysed at the laboratory under standard test methods for their physical, UV, colour appearance and colour fastness properties.

Findings

Results showed that all the sample fabrics have good UV shielding performance (ratings above 50+). Daboya sample fabrics (dyed with indigo dyes) produced more colour stains than the sample fabrics from Ntonso (dyed with black “kuntunkuni” dyes). The K/Ssum value or colour yield reduced after washing but that alternatively increased the calculated ultraviolet protection factor.

Practical implications

Findings from this study exposed the unique UV performance of dyed traditional fabrics (using natural dyes) from Ntonso and Daboya communities in Ghana. This inspires and enforces the need for craftsmen to improve their production cycle to produce these fabrics in different sizes which provides the necessary UV shielding abilities for consumers in the wake of climate changes.

Originality/value

This study demonstrated that the natural dyeing process at the two communities produced relatively good UV and colour fastness properties of the sample fabrics. These eco-friendly dyeing practices have survived over time to maintain and promote the concept of sustainability within the textile and fashion industry in Ghana.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Atta Brenya Bonsu, Kingsley Opoku Appiah, Prince Gyimah and Richard Owusu-Afriyie

The study explores the current  public sector accountability practices in sub-Saharan African region. Specifically, this study assesses whether accountability is related to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The study explores the current  public sector accountability practices in sub-Saharan African region. Specifically, this study assesses whether accountability is related to integrity, internal control system and leadership in the public sector of a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation model (SEM) is used to predict the drivers of public accountability in a developing country. A survey design with quantitative analysis is used to analyze responses from directors or heads of agencies or departments in the ministries of a developing country.

Findings

The result shows that integrity, internal control and leadership practices positively and significantly impact public accountability. These findings suggest that public accountability in the developing economic context is a function of these aforementioned factors to ensure efficient public sector accountability and governance. The findings could assist policymakers in Sub-Saharan African country to enhance accountability among different departments and agencies of government.

Originality/value

This study makes an important contribution by providing evidence of drivers of public accountability from the perspective of public sector entities in Sub-Saharan African country, to complement the extant literature that has focused largely on developed economies

Details

IIM Ranchi journal of management studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2754-0138

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2023

Abstract

Details

Delivering Entrepreneurship Education in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-326-8

Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2022

Kwame Oduro Amoako, Isaac Oduro Amoako, James Tuffour and Newman Amaning

This study was aimed at examining the motivations, elements and channels of sustainability reporting of a multinational mining company that operates a subsidiary in Ghana…

Abstract

This study was aimed at examining the motivations, elements and channels of sustainability reporting of a multinational mining company that operates a subsidiary in Ghana. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among the company’s key stakeholders. These informants were drawn from the case company, a public regulatory agency, members and the opinion leaders of the company’s host community. In addition to the primary data, secondary documents were relied upon to corroborate the views shared by the interviewees. We discovered that while the sustainability reporting mechanism was necessary for gaining internal legitimacy with the parent company, to a large extent, the host community did not appreciate the importance of that report. In place of that the management of the mining subsidiary employed less-formal channels of communication to engage the community representatives on matters relating to sustainability. Our findings suggest that the sustainability reporting process must be adaptable and not always communicated formally. Therefore, the process needs to be re-organised to meet the expectations of all key stakeholders within the subsidiary companies’ jurisdictions. To meet the expectation of stakeholders and gain legitimacy, those charged with the governance of subsidiary companies need to contextualise their sustainability reporting strategies.

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