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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2023

Gianluca Ginesti, Rosalinda Santonastaso and Riccardo Macchioni

This paper aims to investigate the impact of family involvement in ownership and governance on the quality of internal auditing.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of family involvement in ownership and governance on the quality of internal auditing.

Design/methodology/approach

Leveraging a hand-collected data set of listed family firms from 2014 to 2020, this study uses regression analyses to investigate the impact of family ownership, family involvement on the board, family CEO and the generational stage of the family business on the quality of internal auditing.

Findings

The results provide evidence that family ownership is positively associated with the quality of internal auditing, while later generational stages of family businesses have the opposite effect. Additional analyses reveal that the presence of a sustainability board sub-committee moderates the relationship between generational stages of family businesses and the quality of internal auditing function.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not consider country-institutional factors and other potentially family-related antecedents or governance factors that may affect the quality of internal auditing.

Practical implications

The results are informative for investors and non-family stakeholders interested in understanding under which conditions family-related factors influence the quality of internal auditing functions.

Originality/value

This study offers fresh evidence regarding the relationship between family-related factors and the quality of internal auditing and board sub-committees that moderate such a relationship in family businesses.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Bikki Jaggi, Alessandra Allini, Gianluca Ginesti and Riccardo Macchioni

This study aims to examine the impact of corporate board characteristics and country-level legal system on corruption disclosures mandated by the recent European Union (EU…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of corporate board characteristics and country-level legal system on corruption disclosures mandated by the recent European Union (EU) Directive No. 95/2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 234 European listed companies and covering the 2017–2018 period, this study uses regression analyses to empirically test the association of independent directors, board gender diversity and country’s legal system with disclosure of corruption information.

Findings

The presence of independent directors and female directors is positively associated with corporate corruption disclosures. The association between independent directors and corruption disclosures is especially strong when firms are operating in the common law environments.

Research limitations/implications

This study is exclusively focused on larger European listed firms and therefore the findings may not be valid for small and medium firms.

Practical implications

This study provides important information to policymakers to have a better understanding of the factors that influence firms’ disclosure policy on corruption-related activities. It also offers useful information to investors because it shows firms’ propensity to disclose corruption information that would enable them to evaluate their risk and return better.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates firms’ response to the EU Directive No. 95/2014 in disclosing corruption information after its implementation in 2017. It documents the effective role played by female directors in influencing firms’ information disclosure policies. It also confirms that common law environment is more conducive to disclosures.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Gianluca Ginesti, Carlo Drago, Riccardo Macchioni and Giuseppe Sannino

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the female board participation and the readability of annual report.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the female board participation and the readability of annual report.

Design/methodology/approach

Using hand-collected data from a “network-oriented market”, as exists in Italy, which includes 435 annual reports, this study uses a regression analysis to test whether female board participation affects the annual report readability.

Findings

Female board participation is found to have a positive impact on disclosure readability in firms with small boardroom connections but the opposite effect in firms with large boardroom connections.

Research limitations/implications

This paper responds to recent calls in the corporate governance literature by investigating whether the female board participation affects the transparency of the disclosure practices.

Practical implications

This study has policy implications, as it helps to improve evaluations of how, and under which circumstances, female board participation may lead to higher disclosure quality and thus benefit investors.

Originality/value

This paper shows that female board participation has different effects on the disclosure readability at different levels of board positions in inter-firm networks.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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