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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Stephen Sanders

The Joint European Torus (JET) is the flagship for European Fusion Research. This study seeks to address the issue of the need for remote handling in the process of…

Abstract

Purpose

The Joint European Torus (JET) is the flagship for European Fusion Research. This study seeks to address the issue of the need for remote handling in the process of recreating nuclear fusion as a limitless source of clean energy.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes in detail the JET remote handling system with its “man in the loop” approach providing the operator with “remote hands” inside the JET Torus.

Findings

Finds that the increase in requirement for remote operations has necessitated rationalization of task procedures and their associated paper work.

Originality/value

This paper opens the gates for increasing productivity, broadening the scope of remote handling procedures, increasing operating loads and reducing downtime.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Rinaldo Michelini and Roberto Razzoli

The purpose of this paper is to consider surgical robotics, with a focus on technology and design issues for remote‐mode operation assistance. The investigation leads to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider surgical robotics, with a focus on technology and design issues for remote‐mode operation assistance. The investigation leads to the definition of the technical characteristics of a co‐robotic positioning device (CRPD), to be developed in support of a split‐duty approach to planning. The expected characteristics and advantages are outlined, including the operation potential of special‐purpose devices (e.g. an automatic changer for surgical tools) and of scope‐driven enhancers (e.g. the exploration of the intervention theatre).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper addresses example developments based on projects performed with the co‐operation of other robot laboratories in Munich and Paris. The CRPD concept is applied in relation to the DLR KineMedic® arm (developed by the Munich laboratory), and with the LRP prototype mini‐arm (built by the Paris laboratory).

Findings

Minimally‐invasive surgery deserves increasing attention to reduce post‐operative hospital stays and to reduce complications. This leads to new trends in robotics, to facilitate safe, fast and accurate remote manipulation, and integrated computer‐aided implements. The features of the example CRPD design are summarised for the two cases.

Practical implications

The overall comments consider minimally‐invasive robotic surgery as a given intervention practice in the near future, and the split‐duty approach, supported by the CRPD technology, as a valuable aid for human‐robot co‐operation, according to the “best‐of‐skills” idea, supporting intervention under the surgeon's control.

Originality/value

This investigation shows new results aimed at expanding the operation versatility of robotics with integrated intelligence, to enhance scope‐driven alternatives and out‐of‐reach handling with improved dexterity and safe autonomic processing.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

H.Y.K. Lau, M.C.C. Ngan, L.C.C. Wai and A.K.S. Ng

The ability to appreciate the sensation of force and torque that is experienced by the slave device in a teleoperator system is essential for achieving remote

Abstract

The ability to appreciate the sensation of force and torque that is experienced by the slave device in a teleoperator system is essential for achieving remote manipulations such as assembly and disassembly, telesurgery, and remote handling of delicate and dangerous substances. This paper describes an intelligent teleoperator system that not only provides high quality force feedback information in teleoperation but also additional information about the contact formation between the slave device and the environment is presented to the operator. This paper also discusses the design of the teleoperator system and introduces its architecture. Experimental study using the developed teleoperator system is presented that highlights its performance in real life applications.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Hyo Jik Lee, Jong Kwang Lee, Byung Suk Park and Ji Sup Yoon

This paper aims to describe bridge transported servo‐manipulator (BTSM) system, which was developed to overcome the limited workspace of the conventional mechanical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe bridge transported servo‐manipulator (BTSM) system, which was developed to overcome the limited workspace of the conventional mechanical master‐slave manipulators in a hot cell.

Design/methodology/approach

The BTSM system consists of four components: a transporter with a telescoping tubeset, a slave manipulator, a master manipulator, and a remote control system. The slave manipulator is able to move horizontally, transversely, and vertically by using the transporter.

Findings

The performance test of the BTSM system has been carried out in terms of basic functions such as force threshold, bilateral control and force reflection characteristic.

Originality/value

With respect to design characteristic, the BTSM system has the novel features in that the individual motor modules or the slave manipulator can be repaired in a fully remote manner in case of catastrophic failure. Also, a 3D viewing camera facilitates remote tasks giving human operators realistic environmental information.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Philippe Desbats, Franck Geffard, Gérard Piolain and Alain Coudray

Aims to describe how to make an industrial robot work as a telemanipulator with force feedback, in order to carry out various tasks for remote handling in nuclear fuel…

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to describe how to make an industrial robot work as a telemanipulator with force feedback, in order to carry out various tasks for remote handling in nuclear fuel cycle plants.

Design/methodology/approach

The robot Staübli RX170 (used as a slave arm) has been fitted with a force‐torque sensor and an electronic system for sensors' signals multiplexing. The overall system has been made tolerant to γ radiation up to a 10 kGy integrated dose. The industrial robot has been coupled to a master arm with force feedback capability and to the computer assisted teleoperation controller TAO2000 developed by CEA‐LIST.

Findings

The result of the maintenance operation reported in the paper, carried out with a Staübli RX170 robot at AREVA/COGEMA La Hague plant, illustrates the validity of this approach and demonstrates how remote handling can benefit from this new technology.

Originality/value

Introduces the teleoperation of industrial robots as a new solution for the maintenance of nuclear facilities. Wrist force/torque sensing and advanced master‐slave controller provide the operators with a high performance teleoperation system. Only limited modification of the existing design of the industrial robot has been carried out in order to transform it into a nuclear telemanipulator.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Kiho Kim, Byung‐Suk Park, Ho‐Dong Kim, Syed Hassan and Jungwon Yoon

Hot‐cells are shielded structures protecting individuals from radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to propose a design approach for a hot‐cell simulator…

Abstract

Purpose

Hot‐cells are shielded structures protecting individuals from radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to propose a design approach for a hot‐cell simulator using digital mock‐up (DMU) technology and combining Haptic guided complex robotic manipulation for assembly tasks in a virtual environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The principal reason for developing a simulator was to explore the feasibility of hot‐cell structure design and collision‐free assembly process. For this, a simulation design philosophy has been proposed that includes DMU facility offering the ability of analyzing the operations and performing complex robotic manipulations in the virtual hot‐cell environment. Furthermore, enhanced Haptic mapping for tele‐manipulation is proposed for training and guidance purposes.

Findings

From the analysis and task scenarios performed in virtual simulator, the optimal positions of the manipulators and need of (bridge transport dual arm servo‐manipulators) type were identified. Operation tasks were performed remotely using virtual hot‐cell technology by simulating the scenarios in the DMU reducing the overall operation cost and user training. The graphic simulator substantially reduced the cost of the process and maintenance procedure as well as the process equipment by providing a pre‐analysis of whole scenario for real manipulation.

Originality/value

This research tries to contribute to the virtual hot‐cell design philosophy. Tele‐operated complex robotic operations in DMU technology are performed in virtual hot‐cell. The simulator provides improved Haptic guidance with force and torque feedback enhancing the realism of virtual environment.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Rob Buckingham and Andrew Graham

The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of snake‐arm robots to conduct inspection and repair operations within nuclear power plants. The systems that have been…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of snake‐arm robots to conduct inspection and repair operations within nuclear power plants. The systems that have been developed and deployed are described. Operational experience and results are provided. Inspection and repair of aging plant is increasingly important to continue to generate electricity safely from high value assets.

Design/methodology/approach

Snake‐arm robots are hyper‐redundant, multi‐jointed, wire rope drive manipulators that are able to snake between obstructions and gain access to areas that are inaccessible to people.

Findings

The benefits to nuclear operators arising from the deployment of snake arm robots include significant dose saving, increased quality and quantity of acquired data and the ability to enable repairs in highly confined spaces.

Originality/value

The two case studies are first‐of‐kind applications and indicate a direction of travel for the coming decades, both in the nuclear sector and far beyond.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

B.L. Luk, K.P. Liu, A.A. Collie, D.S. Cooke and S. Chen

Aims to report on the various types of tele‐operated mobile service robots for remote inspection and maintenance, especially in the field of nuclear industry.

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1663

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to report on the various types of tele‐operated mobile service robots for remote inspection and maintenance, especially in the field of nuclear industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes nuclear electric robot operator (NERO), Sizewell A duct inspection equipment (SADIE), Robug‐IIs (all leg‐based) and Roboslave (wheel‐based).

Findings

That these robots can handle a significant portion of inspection and maintenance tasks in a typical nuclear plant, though, given that they are primarily tailor‐made, they are still too expensive for ordinary industries.

Originality/value

As the interests of health and safety and paramount, this study sees the use of such robots expanding and diversifying, irrespective of cost.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Allen Thunell and Lisa Robinson

This paper gives suggestions for how remote access electronic resources could be described in bibliographic records and provides examples of such descriptive practices…

Abstract

This paper gives suggestions for how remote access electronic resources could be described in bibliographic records and provides examples of such descriptive practices. These practices are developed from principles expressed in the International Standard Bibliographic Description for Electronic Resources and promote a broadening of the concept of physical description as expressed in Chapter 9 of the Anglo‐American Cataloging Rules, 2nd edition. The paper encourages catalogers to reach beyond their comfort zone to create timely and patron‐friendly bibliographic records for electronic resources.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1961

IN every decade some word is thrown to the surface of men's minds and proves powerful enough to colour and condition their thinking. At present the word is automation. We…

Abstract

IN every decade some word is thrown to the surface of men's minds and proves powerful enough to colour and condition their thinking. At present the word is automation. We see it as the crucible to resolve all our production problems, the formula to express our hopes for the future.

Details

Work Study, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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