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Article

Pamela M. Barnes

Argues that there is no guarantee that it will be possible to maintain the present situation, with regard to energy, in an enlarged EU. Indeed, the enlargement has…

Abstract

Argues that there is no guarantee that it will be possible to maintain the present situation, with regard to energy, in an enlarged EU. Indeed, the enlargement has heightened concerns that the current approach may be undermined. Deplores the absence of a clear safety framework for EU nuclear installations and further details the problems, in full, in the article.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part

Keith Baker

This chapter argues that the concept of metagovernance offers an alternative to multi-level governance (MLG) for understanding how policy is delivered through complex…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter argues that the concept of metagovernance offers an alternative to multi-level governance (MLG) for understanding how policy is delivered through complex networks. Whereas MLG portrays the state as a diminished entity, metagovernance argues for a strong, capable state that can govern through the deployment of policy tools. The chapter identifies and evaluates how policy tools are selected to realise the strategic objectives of government.

Methodology/approach

A critical case methodology is employed. Nuclear power is held to be a most difficult test for the British government’s ability to metagovern. The empirical data was collected from in-depth qualitative interviews conducted between August 2008 and July 2013.

Findings

The chapter shows that the British government’s metagovernance efforts are informed by the risks that would-be developer face. The British government is shown to have some ability to practice metagovernance but the complexities of nuclear power and the existence of a MLG structure create risks that government cannot overcome. It is also observed that in nuclear power programmes, the risks of construction cost overruns and electricity price fluctuations have the greatest impact on the calculations of would-be developers.

Research implications

The findings offer insight into the limits of government capacity in the face of networks and claims of continued state power. The chapter links together the literature on risk and the emergent literature on metagovernance. It is shown that institutional risks in the form of political opportunism are ever present and cannot be easily overcome.

Practical implications

Government are often called upon oversee difficult projects that are delivered by commercial actors. The findings indicate how governments might approach the task and point to a need for greater sensitivity to the nature of the project itself.

Social implications

The empirical results show that to moderate risk, government has tended to adopt very technocratic policies that limit wider democratic consultation in favour of working directly with commercial actors.

Originality/value

The chapter presents a detailed analysis of government decision-making in a highly controversial area of public policy – nuclear power.

Details

Multi-Level Governance: The Missing Linkages
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-874-8

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 12 no. 4/5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Diane Ryland

Asks whether nuclear power is viable as a clean source of energy and an independent energy source and whether it should be used to attain targeted reductions in fossil…

Abstract

Asks whether nuclear power is viable as a clean source of energy and an independent energy source and whether it should be used to attain targeted reductions in fossil fuels or as a method of electricity generation. Also considers whether nuclear energy should be used in preference to energy from a third country. Discusses problems such as technological safety, nuclear waste, costs and the individual energy policies of Member States. Cites the main issue as public perception as the subject is regarded as dangerous and secretive. Outlines how the debate in Europe is being re‐evaluated and with the evolution of new science and technology, the positive contribution of nuclear energy to sustainable development is a factor to be weighed in the balance.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Expert briefing

Energy policy in South Korea.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB224440

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article

Jinjin Wang, Zhengxin Wang and Qin Li

In recent years, continuous expansion of the scale of the new energy export industry in China caused a boycott of American and European countries. Export injury early…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, continuous expansion of the scale of the new energy export industry in China caused a boycott of American and European countries. Export injury early warning research is an urgent task to develop the new energy industry in China. The purpose of this paper is to build an indicator system of exports injury early warning of the new energy industry in China and corresponding quantitative early warning models.

Design/methodology/approach

In consideration of the actual condition of the new energy industry in China, this paper establishes an indicator system according to four aspects: export price, export quantity, impact on domestic industry and impact on macro economy. Based on the actual data of new energy industry and its five sub-industries (solar, wind, nuclear power, smart grid and biomass) in China from 2003 to 2013, GM (1,1) model is used to predict early warning index values for 2014-2018. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) is used to obtain the comprehensive early warning index values for 2003-2018. The 3-sigma principle is used to divide the early warning intervals according to the comprehensive early warning index values for 2003-2018 and their standard deviation. Finally, this paper determines alarm degrees for 2003-2018.

Findings

Overall export condition of the new energy industry in China is a process from cold to normal in 2003-2013, and the forecast result shows that it will be normal from 2014 to 2018. The export condition of the solar energy industry experienced a warming process, tended to be normal, and the forecast result shows that it will also be normal in 2014-2018. The biomass and other new energy industries and nuclear power industry show a similar development process. Export condition of the wind energy industry is relatively unstable, and it will be partially hot in 2014-2018, according to the forecast result. As for the smart grid industry, the overall export condition of it is normal, but it is also unstable, in few years it will be partially hot or partially cold. The forecast result shows that in 2014-2018, it will maintain the normal state. In general, there is a rapid progress in the export competitiveness of the new energy industry in China in the recent decade.

Practical implications

Export injury early warning research of the new energy industry can help new energy companies to take appropriate measures to reduce trade losses in advance. It can also help the relevant government departments to adjust industrial policies and optimize the new energy industry structure.

Originality/value

This paper constructs an index system that can measure the alarm degrees of the new energy industry. By combining the GM (1,1) model and the PCA method, the problem of warning condition detection under small sample data sets is solved.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

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Article

Kevin Yessian, Pat DeLaquil, Bruno Merven, Maurizio Gargiulo and Gary Goldstein

An economic assessment was performed of the potential for clean energy options to contribute to the power and desalination needs in the State of Kuwait over the next 20 to…

Abstract

Purpose

An economic assessment was performed of the potential for clean energy options to contribute to the power and desalination needs in the State of Kuwait over the next 20 to 40 years. The paper aims to summarize two analyses that were performed for the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research to develop a strategy promoting renewable energy and evaluating alternative technologies including nuclear energy.

Design/methodology/approach

The analyses were performed using a power and water model for Kuwait that was constructed using the International Energy Agency – Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (IEA‐ETSAP) TIMES modeling framework. Data provided by the Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW) and the Kuwait Petroleum Company (KPC) characterizes the projected demand for power and water; the existing and planned power generation and water desalination plants, including the expected retirement of existing plants; and future fossil fuel prices and availability. New power generation options – including renewable energy (RE), nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT) and reheat steam power plants (RHSPP) – were compared in this least‐cost optimization framework.

Findings

The model results indicate that by 2030 the cost‐effective RE share is 11 percent of electricity generation in the reference case and 8 percent in the case with the nuclear option. The RE technologies alone provide a 2030 net‐back value compared to the reference case of US$2.35 billion, while in the nuclear case they increase the 2030 net‐back value by an additional US$1.5 billion. Increasing the RE share, as a government policy, to 10 percent, 15 percent and 20 percent, decreases the 2030 netback benefit by US$1.0, $3.6 and $8.3 billion, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Sensitivity runs based on scenarios that assume higher RE costs or lower availability, lower demand growth, lower oil and gas prices, higher nuclear plant investment costs, and RE capacity credit were analyzed.

Practical implications

The analysis provides a compelling economic basis for initiating a renewable energy program in the State of Kuwait. However, these forecasted benefits will only materialize to the extent the projected RE investments are achieved if they begin in earnest soon.

Originality/value

The analysis identifies a cost‐effective share of renewable energy use in Kuwait as about 11 percent of electricity generation in 2030. The investment in renewable energy provides the State of Kuwait with a net‐back value of US$2.35 billion, due to the fuel savings that are generated by using renewables.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article

Liisa Sallinen, Inkeri Ruuska and Tuomas Ahola

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding on stakeholder influence in large projects, using nuclear power plant projects and a governmental stakeholder that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding on stakeholder influence in large projects, using nuclear power plant projects and a governmental stakeholder that influences them as the empirical example. The authors focus on examining the means used by the stakeholder to influence the projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the descriptive single case study approach, using data from 18 semi‐structured interviews. The authors interviewed experts at a governmental stakeholder organization, but in order to gain insight from outside the governmental stakeholder, they also interviewed two other organizations: an energy company, and the highest administrative ministry in the nuclear industry.

Findings

The governmental stakeholder bases its influence on regulations and laws. This paper points out the distinct means that are used by the governmental stakeholder to influence nuclear projects: means that restrain, and also means that enable and advance projects. Both types of means are used at the same time. Enabling means include, among others, allowing projects and firms to contribute to the very same regulations that control the projects.

Originality/value

Much of the earlier research emphasizes government influence as negative to projects, but this paper shows an example of a stakeholder whose influence also includes aspects that are beneficial for projects. The governmental stakeholder can also be understood as a stakeholder that combines two stakes: its own legal stake, and society's moral stake. In carrying society's stake in projects, the governmental stakeholder acts as an intermediary.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Expert briefing

The outlook for China's efforts to export nuclear energy technology.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB213684

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing

China's nuclear programme.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB210165

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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