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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Jeff French, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Rory Mulcahy

This paper aims to explore the potential contributions of the for-profit sector in integrating resources with social marketing organisations for value co-creation at the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the potential contributions of the for-profit sector in integrating resources with social marketing organisations for value co-creation at the meso level (midstream) of the social marketing eco-system. The paper addresses calls for further theorisation and understanding of value co-creation beyond the micro level (downstream).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from social marketing, value co-creation and eco-systems literature to present a conceptual model for meso-level value co-creation between social marketing and for-profit organisations.

Findings

The paper proposes four dimensions of resources which can be integrated: cognitive, labour, economic and network. Additionally, it is proposed that from these integrated resources, three co-creation outcomes can be achieved – co-learning, co-design and co-production – which lead to improved value propositions.

Practical implications

This paper offers a framework for strategic planning and evaluation regarding partnerships and collaborations with for-profit organisations, which potentially lead to greater value propositions being offered.

Originality/value

This paper furthers the theoretical discussions and understanding of value co-creation in social marketing at the meso level. The paper identifies a new actor – for-profits – as a potential collaborator for value co-creation with social marketing organisations and contributes new understanding about value co-creation at the meso level between social marketing and for-profit organisations. Further, the paper describes and reviews the potential contributions of for-profits to social marketing efforts.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2017

Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Rory Mulcahy, Jo-Anne Little and Tim Swinton

Designing a social marketing intervention for low-income earners requires an understanding of the key motivations. As part of the Low-Income Earner Energy Efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

Designing a social marketing intervention for low-income earners requires an understanding of the key motivations. As part of the Low-Income Earner Energy Efficiency Programme, this study investigates the key factors that influence energy behaviours amongst Australian young low-income earners as part of the Reduce Your Juice social marketing programme. The authors also investigate the effect of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 753 low-income renters was conducted using validated measures. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The two factors that had the highest influence on intentions for energy-saving behaviours was the “mind” factor of self-efficacy and “money” factor of price concern. There were gender differences in the effect of bill control and price concern on intentions for different energy efficiency behaviours.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance on the factors to emphasise when designing an energy efficiency programme for low-income earners.

Social implications

This study provides evidence for different motivations amongst low-income earners for energy efficiency programmes and that a “one size fits all” approach may not be effective.

Originality/value

While there is high interest in the public sector for motivating young-adult low-income earners to change their energy behaviours, little is known about the key factors that motivate intentions to engage in these behaviours.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Rory Francis Mulcahy, Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Nadia Zainuddin and Kerri-Ann Kuhn

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to extend transformative service and social marketing practitioners’ and academics’ understanding of how gamification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to extend transformative service and social marketing practitioners’ and academics’ understanding of how gamification and serious m-games are designed, and second, to model the effects of game design elements on key transformative service and social marketing outcomes, satisfaction, knowledge, and behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a two-study, mixed-method research design, encompassing focus groups (n=21) and online surveys (n=497), using four current marketplace serious m-games. Study 1 was qualitative and the data were analysed in two cycles using an inductive and deductive approach. Study 2 was quantitative and the data were analysed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

The qualitative results of Study 1 discovered a framework of five game design elements for serious m-games. In Study 2, a conceptual model and hypothesised relationships were tested at a full sample level and by each serious m-game. Results show different significant relationships for each serious m-game and moderate to high levels of explanation for satisfaction and knowledge, and low to high levels of explained variance for behavioural intentions. The findings are therefore not only robust across four different serious m-games, but also demonstrate the nuances of the relationships.

Originality/value

This research contributes to two service research priorities: leveraging technology to advance services, and improving well-being through transformative services. This research demonstrates that gamification through serious m-games is one form of technology that can be designed to create a satisfying and knowledge-creating service experience, which can also influence intentions to perform health and well-being behaviours.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Raymond P. Fisk, Mark S. Rosenbaum and Nadia Zainuddin

The purpose of this paper is to discuss two parallel but distinct subfields of marketing that share common interests (enhancing consumers’ lives and improving well-being)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss two parallel but distinct subfields of marketing that share common interests (enhancing consumers’ lives and improving well-being): social marketing and transformative service research. The authors also suggest a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a conceptual approach and research agenda by comparing and contrasting the two marketing fields of transformative service research and social marketing.

Findings

Specifically, this paper proposes three opportunities to propel both fields forward: 1) breaking boundaries that inhibit research progress, which includes collaboration between public, private and nonprofit sectors to improve well-being; 2) adopting more customer-oriented approaches that go beyond the organizational and individual levels; and 3) taking a non-linear approach to theory development that innovates and co-creates solutions.

Originality/value

This paper presents the challenges and structural barriers for two subfields seeking to improve human well-being. This paper is the first to bring these subfields together and propose a way for them to move forward together.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Mark Scott Rosenbaum and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

This paper aims to identify future research opportunities that address human–technology service interactions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify future research opportunities that address human–technology service interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial is based on the author’s personal reflections and conceptualizations of ideas from past previous research and theory.

Findings

The authors identify three opportunities for further research on technology and humanity: service technology and social interaction and service technology and societal prosperity.

Research limitations/implications

Service researchers need to realize that topics such as technology, robots, artificial intelligence are not mutually exclusive from topics that seek to improve the human condition, such as transformative service research. We encourage service researchers to explore how digital technologies in service domains impacts consumers, communities, and even, global humanity.

Practical implications

Researchers have guidance on areas in which pioneering theoretical and methodological opportunities abound.

Originality/value

This editorial offers new perspectives on technology and humanity considering the effect of the global pandemic.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Mark Scott Rosenbaum and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

This paper aims to define the term “socially unacceptable services” and call for novel research in these under-researched service industries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define the term “socially unacceptable services” and call for novel research in these under-researched service industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal reflections.

Findings

Service offerings exist that, despite their ability to create value for customers, clients or partners, many in society at large deem to be offensive, inappropriate or harmful for a variety of reasons. Service researchers have ignored the existence and impact of socially unacceptable services on consumers and society for too long.

Research limitations/implications

Given the expanding role of the transformative service research (TSR) paradigm in the services marketing domain, especially given its emphasis on exchanges that influence consumer and societal well-being and the reality that many socially unacceptable services profoundly influence consumer and societal welfare in both positive and negative manners, the time is opportune for service researchers to begin exploring socially unacceptable services from a TSR perspective.

Practical implications

Given that buyers and sellers who enter socially unacceptable exchanges often seem satisfied by doing so, the authors encourage researchers to unearth how consumers obtain value from these exchanges and to explore whether consumers enter these exchanges with full information to make informed decisions.

Originality/value

This viewpoint is one of the first to provide authors with an impetus to begin research program in socially unacceptable services and offers researchers a list of potential research topics in this new area. The authors believe that socially unacceptable service research may emerge as a separate research paradigm.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Mark Scott Rosenbaum and Ryan McAndrew

This paper aims to represent a response to issues raised in the continuing quantitative-qualitative debate by Valtakoski (2020). Which appeared in a Journal of Services

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to represent a response to issues raised in the continuing quantitative-qualitative debate by Valtakoski (2020). Which appeared in a Journal of Services Marketing (JSM) special issue on qualitative research in service-oriented research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a content analysis of 1,268 papers that were published in JSM (1987-2019). In addition, the authors had data that is held in JSM’s manuscript central submission portal.

Findings

The analysis shows that while there is a dominance of quantitative methods in the journal, the proportion of qualitative papers is growing. During 2014-2019, 83.4 per cent of submitted papers to JSM represented quantitative research and 14 per cent represented qualitative research; however, 75 per cent of accepted papers were quantitative and 25 per cent were qualitative/mixed methods. Thus, the proportion of published qualitative studies are increasing and have a higher chance of receiving an acceptance decision compared to quantitative studies. Additionally, the largest percentage of qualitative papers published in JSM derive from corresponding authors outside of North America.

Research limitations/implications

Service researchers who opt to use inductive research methods, which tend to use qualitative research, will not confront discrimination based solely upon the use of a research methodology among editors or reviewers at JSM.

Practical implications

JSM welcomes qualitative research that has rich practical implications.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to provide authors with a detailed analysis and responses to the qualitative-quantitative debate in marketing.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Steve Baron

This editorial aims to highlight the challenges and dilemmas faced by journal editors and the implications for the editorial process.

Abstract

Purpose

This editorial aims to highlight the challenges and dilemmas faced by journal editors and the implications for the editorial process.

Design/methodology/approach

A sporting metaphor has been used. A soccer referee is used to highlight the tasks, roles and dilemmas faced by editors.

Findings

Editors need to identify the role they wish to play in the editorial process, and this role involves balancing the dilemmas and identifying trade-offs.

Originality/value

This research offers insight into the editorial role for authors to assist them in understanding both the process and the decisions that are made in a complex, competitive environment of publishing.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Steve Baron and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

The purpose of this paper it to highlight the challenges of managing and handling data for services marketers that have been brought about by the contemporary environment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper it to highlight the challenges of managing and handling data for services marketers that have been brought about by the contemporary environment and emerging schools of thought.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparison is made between conventional data collection and statistical analysis, and the need to glean information from large, pre-existing data sets for future contributions to service research.

Findings

For service marketers to tackle real world, large problem areas, there will be a need to develop methods of dealing with data which pre-exist in many forms, as well as data that are collected via well-established procedures.

Originality/value

The study should be an encouragement for services marketing researchers to develop innovative methods of data handling which recognize a world of burgeoning data sources and types.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Nadia Zainuddin and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

Abstract

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

1 – 10 of 83