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Article

Jessica E. Moyer and Terry L. Weech

To provide a comparative review of the teaching of Readers' Advisory Services in schools of library and information science in selected schools in the USA, Canada and Europe.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a comparative review of the teaching of Readers' Advisory Services in schools of library and information science in selected schools in the USA, Canada and Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing the literature, schools are selected based on their known activity in providing readers' advisory service courses or on their national ranking (in the case of US schools) to provide a snapshot of current level of readers' advisory instruction.

Findings

Instruction in readers' advisory services is a very small part of the total curriculum in schools examined. Librarians who wish to gain more insight to readers' advisory services must depend on continuing education opportunities, such as workshops and conference programs, not on courses in the curriculum of schools of library and information science.

Originality/value

This paper raises questions as to the relationship between library and information science curricula and the needs of practicing librarians to provide services to leisure readers. It finds that, despite an increased interest in providing readers' advisory services in libraries, library education is not responding to that need and continuing education and training programs are essential to providing librarians who are well prepared to serve leisure readers. For schools which are contemplating adding coursework in these areas, the case studies detail courses as they are offered at other institutions.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

Keren Dali

The purpose of this paper is to address a somewhat under‐researched aspect of readers' advisory services in public libraries in North America, namely, readers' advisory

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a somewhat under‐researched aspect of readers' advisory services in public libraries in North America, namely, readers' advisory for immigrant readers, with a particular emphasis on the readers' advisory interaction/interview.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument draws on the review of relevant scholarly and professional literature and the author's experience in working with immigrant readers.

Findings

It is suggested that public libraries in North America are not actively involved in providing readers' advisory services to immigrant readers aside from developing and maintaining multilingual collections. This trend in readers' advisory practices is clearly reflected in professional and scholarly publications of the field. It is argued that personal interactions with immigrant readers, in the context of the readers' advisory interview, can be an efficient way to engage immigrant readers in the life of the host society, thus fostering their socio‐cultural integration beyond information needs and basic coping skills.

Originality/value

The paper offers practical insights and suggestions for the enhancement of readers' advisory interactions with immigrant readers in public libraries. It also places readers' advisory interactions with immigrant readers in the broader context of readers' advisory practices, public library services to immigrant users, and the theory of readers' advisory interviews.

Details

New Library World, vol. 111 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

Sharon L. Baker

The children's room in my hometown library in Marion, Ohio, was a bright, comforting site, with low shelves of colorful books on every imaginable topic and a desk where…

Abstract

The children's room in my hometown library in Marion, Ohio, was a bright, comforting site, with low shelves of colorful books on every imaginable topic and a desk where kids could, under the librarian's careful guidance, use a red date‐due stamp to check out their own books.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Keren Dali, Clarissa Vannier and Lindsay Douglass

Addressed to the audience of LIS educators at all levels, from full-time and adjunct faculty teaching in LIS programs, to librarians and library consultants delivering…

Abstract

Purpose

Addressed to the audience of LIS educators at all levels, from full-time and adjunct faculty teaching in LIS programs, to librarians and library consultants delivering professional development training, to practitioners who work with readers in all types of libraries, this article makes a case for replacing the term “readers' advisory” with the term “Reading Experience (RE) librarianship” as a designator of the current professional practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using historical and discursive analysis based on the extensive literature review, this article argues that a number of factors call for the change in terminology: changes in the human factor (i.e., changes in readers and reading behavior; and changes in relationships between readers and librarians) and changes in the library environment (the rise of “experience” in libraries; a greater commitment to outreach and community engagement; and the fact that librarians are already practicing RE librarianship without recognizing it as such). It also examines the role of LIS educators in fostering and supporting RE librarianship.

Findings

On the one hand, the new terminology will be more reflective of the work that reader service librarians currently do, thus doing justice to a wide range of activities and expanded roles of librarians; on the other hand, it will serve as an imperative and a motivator to further transform reader services from in-house interactions with and programs for avid readers into a true community engagement, with much broader goals, scope and reach.

Originality/value

The article stands to coin a new professional term for the transformed library practice, thus recording a radical change in longstanding professional activities and encouraging new community-oriented thinking about the expanded role of librarians in promoting reading in diverse social environments.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

Susan J. Freiband

This paper presents some ideas about readers' advisory service for library users whose primary language is not English to offer a perspective about some of the issues…

Abstract

This paper presents some ideas about readers' advisory service for library users whose primary language is not English to offer a perspective about some of the issues involved. Questions are raised to stimulate further study and research in this area of librarianship.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Kathleen de la Peña McCook

Advising readers has received renewed attention in public libraries, library associations, and programs of library and information science. Writing of their belief in…

Abstract

Advising readers has received renewed attention in public libraries, library associations, and programs of library and information science. Writing of their belief in readers' advisory services Saricks and Brown note, “Readers' advisors and proponents of the service subscribe whole‐heartedly to the philosophy that reading, of and by itself, has intrinsic value.” In her essay on new directions for readers' advisory services, Ross characterizes readers' attitudes toward books as providing a “special kind of pleasure that cannot be achieved in any other way,” and summarizes several studies that examine the role of reading in people's lives.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Duncan Smith

In a recent RQ column, Sharon L. Baker reviewed the profession's literature in the area of readers' advisory services. She found that very little research existed in the…

Abstract

In a recent RQ column, Sharon L. Baker reviewed the profession's literature in the area of readers' advisory services. She found that very little research existed in the area of readers' advisory services. The research that does exist is focused on “passive” readers' advisory strategies. Baker is a leader in this area and her articles on overload and browsing, the use of displays, and genre classification are essential to understanding the adult fiction reader and ways in which libraries can assist these individuals in locating new authors and titles of interest.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part

Gloria J. Leckie and Lisa M. Given

The history of the public library is long and rich, and continues to reflect this institution's initial mission: to respond to the needs of an evolving democratic society…

Abstract

The history of the public library is long and rich, and continues to reflect this institution's initial mission: to respond to the needs of an evolving democratic society. From its early days as a subscription service for the middle-class, through its evolution to become an educational site for the lower-classes and new immigrants, the public library has served as a touch-stone for urban industrial society in North America (Lerner, 1998, p. 138; Shera, 1974). Over the past century, public libraries have evolved to respond to the growing needs of the communities they serve and continue to do so with recent advances in technologies (such as DVDs, electronic books, the Internet, etc.), and with a more global outlook on the ways that people seek and share information. Indeed, the public library's constituents today are exceedingly diverse, including children and adults from a broad range of socio-economic, cultural, and educational backgrounds, all of whom seek information for a variety of personal and work-related purposes. The fact that public libraries have been fulfilling patrons' information needs for well over a century is a testament to their enduring success and versatility as information providers, and also points to the overall effectiveness of public librarians as intermediaries in the provision process.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-629-8

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Article

Keren Dali

The purpose of this paper is to analyze a number of issues related to both education for and the practice of reading and readersadvisory in library and information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze a number of issues related to both education for and the practice of reading and readersadvisory in library and information science (LIS). Written from the standpoint of an LIS educator, the paper is addressed to LIS professors, future and current LIS students, and public services librarians working in all types of libraries, including academic and special, because the practice of reading is no longer limited to school and public libraries. Librarians’ expertise can also benefit a larger community outside of the library walls, which would take outreach and embeddedness to an entirely new level.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the situation in LIS education and reading practices based on a vast array of published sources and the author’s personal experience as an LIS educator.

Findings

The following problematic points are raised: modeling reading work and education for reading after information services and information science education, respectively; outdated pedagogical approaches; insufficient user orientation and excessive focus on materials; limiting reading activities to one to two types of libraries; insufficient community outreach; and, in general, the prevalence of responsive rather than proactive practices.

Originality/value

The paper proposes some solutions for the identified problems, the implementation of which depends on the collective effort and the collective will. However, it does not offer a particularly optimistic or upbeat view on the possibility of swift and sweeping changes.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Anne Lundin

In the novel, The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers probes the American malaise through the longings of a young adolescent girl. Twelve‐year‐old Frankie no longer…

Abstract

In the novel, The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers probes the American malaise through the longings of a young adolescent girl. Twelve‐year‐old Frankie no longer sees the world as round and inviting as a school globe. No, the world is huge and cracked and turning a thousand miles an hour. Indeed, the world seems separate from herself. In the midst of chaos, Frankie sees her brother's upcoming wedding as a chance to feel connected, to feel that she matters. The story focuses on Frankie's efforts to be a “member of the wedding,” as she recognizes, “they are the we of me.”

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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