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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Randi L. Sims and Ravi Chinta

Using Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation as a theoretical basis, this study aims to test the relationship between female entrepreneurial efficacy, entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

Using Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation as a theoretical basis, this study aims to test the relationship between female entrepreneurial efficacy, entrepreneurial ambition and nascent entrepreneurial drive, accounting for the potential barriers of race and minority disadvantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included 950 respondents comprising 213 Black women and 737 White women living in the state of Alabama, USA, who expressed an intention to starting their own business.

Findings

The results indicate that race and perceptions of minority disadvantage are perceived barriers in the mediated relationship between female entrepreneurial efficacy, entrepreneurial ambition and entrepreneurial drive. However, the findings suggest that, unlike race, minority disadvantage is not perceived as a significant factor in the mediated relationship between entrepreneurial confidence, entrepreneurial ambition and entrepreneurial drive.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include the lack of an experimental design and the use of cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

Results are discussed in terms of the context of the history of racial and gender discrimination within the state of Alabama, USA.

Social implications

The results show that the direct effects of minority disadvantage on entrepreneurial ambition are significantly higher for the Black women compared with the White women in our sample.

Originality/value

The results of this study show that the direct effects of minority disadvantage on entrepreneurial ambition are significantly higher for the Black women compared with the White women. For the subgroup of Black women, the greater the perception of minority disadvantage, the greater the entrepreneurial ambition reported.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Darshana D. Palkar, Randi L. Sims and Emre Kuvvet

In this paper, the authors examine the association between a firm's geographical location and the value of its cash holdings.

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors examine the association between a firm's geographical location and the value of its cash holdings.

Design/methodology/approach

Following Loughran and Schultz (2005) and Nielsson and Wójcik (2016), the authors define firms as either geographically remote or geographically proximate based on their distance to areas that are either largely populated or concentrated in financial expertise. We also estimate the marginal value of cash using the model developed by Faulkender and Wang (2006).

Findings

The authors find that the marginal value of cash is $0.10–$0.16 lower in remotely located firms than in geographically proximate firms. The lower marginal value of cash is prominent among remotely located firms with greater severity of information asymmetry. Our findings support the view that the inability of shareholders to closely monitor how managers use of firm cash may increase the perceived conflicts of interest associated with managers' cash spending and decrease the value of cash.

Originality/value

Previous studies try to explain the cash holdings puzzle by attributing it to CEO overconfidence, external funding constraints, poor corporate governance, difference in corporate financial policy, poor investor protection, lack of firm diversification and large operating losses. This study contributes to the extant literature by offering new evidence of the role of geographic location on the value of cash holdings.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Randi L. Sims

The current study aims to continue the investigation of cross‐cultural differences in attitudes towards business ethics.

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to continue the investigation of cross‐cultural differences in attitudes towards business ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study compares the results of the attitudes towards business ethics questionnaire (ATBEQ) reported in the literature for samples from Israel, South Africa, Turkey, the USA, and Western Australia with a new sample from Jamaica and West Indies (n=139).

Findings

The result indicate that, while there are some shared views towards business ethics across countries, significant differences do exist between Jamaica and three of the other countries in the study.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the use of respondents who are employees as well as students and the use of secondary data that limit the selection of statistical testing.

Practical implications

As researchers continue to collect information concerning the ethical opinions of business people from varying countries, one's understanding of these cultural differences increases. This knowledge will help in reducing misunderstanding, aid in negotiation, and build trust and respect. This is especially important, given the continued growth of international business opportunities.

Originality/value

This paper specifically compares the attitudes of employees using the same survey instrument across six nations.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Randi L. Sims

This study explores the relationship between conflicting ethical expectations and managerial attitudes. Using a sample of 107 managerial level employees, the findings…

Abstract

This study explores the relationship between conflicting ethical expectations and managerial attitudes. Using a sample of 107 managerial level employees, the findings indicate that as the perceived difference between formal and informal ethical expectations increases, intentions to turnover increase and job satisfaction, organizational satisfaction, and affective commitment decrease.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Randi L. Sims

As interest in the field of business ethics grows, so does the need for measures which can be utilized by a wide range of researchers. The purpose of this study is to…

Abstract

As interest in the field of business ethics grows, so does the need for measures which can be utilized by a wide range of researchers. The purpose of this study is to research ethical business scenarios which are useful in studying ethical decision making, six such dilemmas are presented. The preliminary analysis, utilizing 248 respondents employed in full‐time positions, indicates that overall the dilemmas do not simply measure demographic characteristics of the individual or organization, but instead measure actual differences in ethical decision making.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Randi L. Sims and Peng Sun

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between witnessing workplace bullying behavior and employee attitudes and intentions to turnover.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between witnessing workplace bullying behavior and employee attitudes and intentions to turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 150 full‐time employees from two mid‐sized indigenous private manufacturing plants from the province of Henan, China were surveyed at a single point in time.

Findings

Findings indicate a negative relationship between witnessing workplace bullying and employee satisfaction and commitment. In addition, strain and satisfaction fully mediate the relationship between witnessing workplace bullying and employee intention to turnover.

Research limitations/implications

Given the link between witnessing workplace bullying and employee attitudes, it is important for Chinese managers to ensure that interactions with employees maintain a positive and professional tone.

Originality/value

The paper's findings suggest that it is not necessary for an employee to be the personal victim of bullying behavior, rather an employee need only be an observer of workplace bullying in order to experience increases in physical and emotional strain.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Randi L. Sims and Jess J. Boytell

The purpose of this paper is to test the relation between employee goal orientation and occupational withdrawal intentions and behaviors considering employee satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the relation between employee goal orientation and occupational withdrawal intentions and behaviors considering employee satisfaction a mediator in the relations.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from a sample of 241 licensed real estate professionals using a self-administrated questionnaire. Mediation hypotheses were tested using Smart PLS.

Findings

The results indicate that job satisfaction fully mediates the relation between learning goal orientation and occupational withdrawal intentions and behaviors. A direct positive relation was found between avoid goal orientation and occupational withdrawal intentions and behaviors.

Practical implications

Worker shortages in many occupations increases the importance of the ability to understand and predict occupational withdrawal behaviors.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature by considering goal orientation as an individual employee characteristics central in predicting and understanding occupational attitudes and withdrawal intentions and behaviors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Cynthia P. Ruppel, Randi L. Sims and Peter Zeidler

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether Western human resource (HR) theory is applicable to a call centre located in the Philippines. A call centre, due to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether Western human resource (HR) theory is applicable to a call centre located in the Philippines. A call centre, due to the amount of emotional labour involved in this type of work, is an ideal environment to study stress related Western HR model where stress eventually leads to turnover. Turnover is a major concern in the call centre industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a model linking work stress to job satisfaction, organizational commitment and intention to turnover using data collected from 439 employees in the Philippines. Both correlation analysis and partial least squares analysis were used to test the theoretical Western HR components both individually and holistically.

Findings

The findings indicate that these call centre employees reported emotional stress, leading to job dissatisfaction, reduced organization commitment and ultimately increased intention to turnover. Turnover is reported to be a serious and increasing problem in call centres and this research demonstrates the significant role of employee emotional stress.

Practical implications

An understanding of the applicability of Western HR theory in non-western countries is of interest to managers in non-western countries. It is important as economic development occurs in newly developing countries that managers understand which theories from developed nations will apply to facilitate their growth and success.

Originality/value

This paper addresses HR concerns both in a Pan-Asian country that is rapidly developing and in the call centre industry which is predicted to grow rapidly in future.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Helen LaVan and Patrick J. Murphy

Competition and entrepreneurship are driving forces in the development of economic systems. They create jobs, new opportunities to generate value, and lead to the…

Abstract

Competition and entrepreneurship are driving forces in the development of economic systems. They create jobs, new opportunities to generate value, and lead to the fulfillment of personal career and life goals. As such, it is important to understand the basic economic and cultural factors that influence these activities in developing economies. We undertook a series of analyses in an examination of a heterogeneous sample of economic zones in Southeast Asia. Results illustrate relations between national culture, human development, and business and growth competitiveness. Implications hold that human development and power distance are enablers of entrepreneurial activities in these cultural and national settings. Our contribution is instrumental to development of public policy and regulatory guidelines for facilitating entrepreneurial activity in the developing economies of Southeast Asia.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

John Fazio, Baiyun Gong, Randi Sims and Yuliya Yurova

The purpose of this paper is to argue that affective commitment plays a significant and complex role in the relationship between social support and turnover intention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that affective commitment plays a significant and complex role in the relationship between social support and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were returned by 217 hospital employees with an average tenure of 11.55 years (SD=10.20).

Findings

Findings suggest that perceived organizational support and perceived supervisor support (PSS) could directly impact turnover intention without the mediation of affective commitment. Thus, affective commitment only partially mediates the negative relation between perceived support and turnover intention. In addition, the results suggest that enhanced PSS reduced turnover intention more powerfully, when affective commitment increased. For a highly committed employee, support from the supervisor can be more influential than that of a less committed employee.

Originality/value

This is an initial investigation on the moderating role of affective commitment in the relationship between perceived social support and turnover intention. Further, the findings emphasize the independent impact of perceived social support above and beyond the effect mediated by affective commitment, thus adding evidence to the debate on the extend of the mediating effect of affective commitment.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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