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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Rajali Maharjan and Shinya Hanaoka

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the importance of the order of establishment of temporary logistics hubs (TLHs) when resources (mobile storage units used as TLHs) are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the importance of the order of establishment of temporary logistics hubs (TLHs) when resources (mobile storage units used as TLHs) are limited and to present the development and implementation of a methodology that determines the order of establishment of TLHs to support post-disaster decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

It employed a decision support system that considers multiple decision makers and subjective attributes, while also addressing the impreciseness inherent in post-disaster decision making for ordering the establishment of TLHs. To do so, an optimization model was combined with a fuzzy multi-attribute group decision making approach. A numerical illustration was performed using data from the April 2015 Nepal Earthquake.

Findings

The results showed the location and order of establishment of TLHs, and demonstrated the impact of decision makers’ opinions on the overall ordering.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not discuss the uncertain nature of the location problem and the potential need for relocation of TLHs.

Practical implications

This methodology offers managerial insights for post-disaster decision making when resources are limited and their effective utilization is vital. The results highlight the importance of considering the opinions of multiple actors/decision makers to enable coordination and avoid complication between the growing numbers of humanitarian responders during disaster response.

Originality/value

This study introduces the concept of the order of establishment of TLHs and demonstrates its importance when resources are limited. It develops and implements a methodology determining the order of establishment of TLHs to support post-disaster decision making.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2024

Rajali Maharjan and Hironori Kato

This study investigates whether logistics and supply chain resilience strategies (SCREST) can help mitigate the negative impacts of disruptions on firm performance and logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates whether logistics and supply chain resilience strategies (SCREST) can help mitigate the negative impacts of disruptions on firm performance and logistics and supply chain (SC) activities of companies, using the COVID-19 pandemic as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected primary data on the implementation of different types of SCRESTs and measured the impact of COVID-19 in terms of firm performance and logistics and SC metrics through a survey of Japanese manufacturing companies in four sectors. The authors used these data to illustrate whether the companies benefitted from SCRESTs in mitigating the negative impacts of COVID-19. A questionnaire comprising structured and open-ended questions was sent to 8,000 companies all over Japan that met the selection criteria, using a combination of mail and web-based media. The respondents were logistics and SC professionals. A combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed for data analysis and interpretation.

Findings

Research conducted within the case of the Japanese context revealed that findings varied depending on the methodology applied. The use of a direct analysis approach and qualitative analysis suggested that the implementation of SCRESTs is beneficial in addressing the negative impacts of COVID-19 on firm performance and logistics and SC activities, whereas the application of indirect analysis approach yielded mixed results. The analysis also indicated a shift in the preferred SCRESTs during COVID-19.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the benefits of implementing SCRESTs using primary data from the manufacturing sector of Japan. Furthermore, empirical research on this topic is generally lacking.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Rajali Maharjan, Yashaswi Shrestha, Biplob Rakhal, Saurav Suman, Jurgen Hulst and Shinya Hanaoka

The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology which amalgamates quantitative and qualitative approaches to determine the best placement of mobile logistics hubs (MLH) to…

3746

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology which amalgamates quantitative and qualitative approaches to determine the best placement of mobile logistics hubs (MLH) to be established in different parts of Nepal as a part of real-life project, “Augmentation of National and Local-Level Emergency Logistics Preparedness in Nepal” (2017–2020), implemented by the World Food Programme in cooperation with the Government of Nepal.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops a methodology using a combination of a modified version of the maximal covering location problem (MCLP) and focus group discussion. The MCLP model is used to determine the optimal number and spatial location of MLHs, and focus group discussion is used to identify the five first-priority strategic MLH locations using expert knowledge.

Findings

The authors identify the five first-priority locations for establishing MLHs using an amalgamation of quantitative approach (mathematical model) and qualitative approach (focus group discussion). By amalgamating mathematical model with expert knowledge, findings acceptable to a wide range of stakeholders are obtained. The focus group discussion helps to pinpoint the location of MLHs to city-level granularity which is otherwise impossible with data available on hand.

Research limitations/implications

Although multiple experts’ judgements were obtained via focus group discussion, subjectivity and possible bias is inevitable. Overall, the quantitative results of the study are purely based on the data available during the study period; therefore, having updated data could possibly improve the quality of the results.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind that uses an amalgamation of mathematical model and expert knowledge to determine the strategic locations of MLHs and has been successful to an extent that the selected locations have been vetted by the government of Nepal for establishing MLHs and are undergoing implementation in real life. This study also considers multiple disaster scenarios and employs the concepts of human development, disaster risk and transportation accessibility to reflect Nepal's socioeconomic, geo-climatic and topographical features.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2018

Rajali Maharjan and Shinya Hanaoka

The purpose of this paper is to develop a mathematical model that determines the location of temporary logistics hubs (TLHs) for disaster response and proposes a new method to…

1196

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a mathematical model that determines the location of temporary logistics hubs (TLHs) for disaster response and proposes a new method to determine weights of the objectives in a multi-objective optimization problem. The research is motivated by the importance of TLHs and the complexity that surrounds the determination of their location.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-period multi-objective model with multi-sourcing is developed to determine the location of the TLHs. A fuzzy factor rating system (FFRS) under the group decision-making (GDM) condition is then proposed to determine the weights of the objectives when multiple decision makers exist.

Findings

The interview with decision makers shows the heterogeneity of decision opinions, thus substantiating the importance of GDM. The optimization results provide useful managerial insights for decision makers by considering the trade-off between two non-commensurable objectives.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, decision makers are considered to be homogeneous, which might not be the case in reality. This study does not consider the stochastic nature of relief demand.

Practical implications

The outcomes of this study are valuable to decision makers for relief distribution planning. The proposed FFRS approach reveals the importance of involving multiple decision makers to enhance sense of ownership of established TLHs.

Originality/value

A mathematical model highlighting the importance of multi-sourcing and short operational horizon of TLHs is developed. A new method is proposed and implemented to determine the weights of the objectives. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the multi-actor and multi-objective aspects of the TLH location problem have not thus far been considered simultaneously for one particular problem in humanitarian logistics.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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