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Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Rachel McLean, Paul G. Oliver and David W. Wainwright

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of the digital culture on the music industries through an analysis of official and unofficial web sites, media reports and…

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6169

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of the digital culture on the music industries through an analysis of official and unofficial web sites, media reports and discussions with musicians.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical social theory approach is adopted to examine structures and processes related to communication between artists, fans, the media, as well as commercial and independent labels. The authors draw upon Habermas' theory using the concept of “communicative action” to inform an analysis of three vignettes or short case studies.

Findings

At first glance it would appear that technology has brought about greater opportunities for independent musicians to communicate, network, promote and distribute, which previously could not be widely published, and to organise against the commercial power of major labels (Majors).

Research limitations/implications

In many spheres of the music industries this “empowerment” does not appear to be realised. For example, previous studies have shown that the domination of the Majors continues to impact on local music scenes to restrict and ultimately prevent the creative ideal deliver a situation that is necessary to empower independent musicians. Current media manipulation and corporate interests restrict and alienate independent musicians who often have more of an intellectual ownership and culture within their local music communities.

Practical implications

Although steps to enable improved visibility and cooperation have been made we are still a long way off musicians having a powerful enough voice to organise against the commercial power of the large labels and media conglomerates (e.g. Apple i‐Tunes). The ideal speech situation remains elusive and the hegemonic state remains unchallenged.

Social implications

Music continues to be commodified and fans are increasingly constructed as “consumers”; the ultimate power remains in mass media and broadcasting rather than independent “narrowcast” and DIY artistry.

Originality/value

This paper extends debate on the impact of the developing “digital culture” focusing on independent musicians and the music industries. It raises issues for further research in this area.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Mike Cushman and Rachel McLean

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the issues of social and digital exclusion and inclusion arising from the development of a digitalised society. It aims to…

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2098

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the issues of social and digital exclusion and inclusion arising from the development of a digitalised society. It aims to highlight the significance of this for the study of information systems by describing the context for this special issue, outlining a number of previously under‐researched areas, giving an overview of the papers chosen for this special issue and describing future directions for research that recognise non‐users and marginal users as important actors in designing and evaluating systems in use.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper sets the scene by discussing the impact of mass involvement in digital culture on the field of information systems and analyses each paper, suggesting ways in which they relate to the chosen themes and drawing conclusions from this discussion.

Findings

The papers chosen address thematic issues, theoretical foundations, methodological issues, empirical studies and reflections on inclusion and exclusion from the digital society.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the growing interest in engagement with the digital culture in the information systems discipline and enables reflection on barriers and opportunities for developing research across boundaries of disciplines, cultures, organizations and accepted topics. It indicates that information systems researchers have an ethical responsibility to consider the impacts of innovations on the least powerful in society as well as the more privileged.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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151

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New Library World, vol. 101 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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250

Abstract

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New Library World, vol. 101 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Rachel McLean and David W. Wainwright

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the digital culture on football supporters through analysis of official and unofficial websites and media reports. At…

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4174

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the digital culture on football supporters through analysis of official and unofficial websites and media reports. At first glance it would appear that technology has brought about greater opportunities to communicate, to share views which previously could not be widely published, and to organise against the commercial power of the large football clubs. However, surveillance, censorship and control continue to impact on supporters to restrict and ultimately prevent the ideal speech situation that is necessary to empower fans and promote greater participation in their clubs. Current media manipulation and corporate interests restrict and alienate fans who often have more of a historically constituted (over generations) sense of ownership and culture within their local clubs.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical social theory approach is adopted to examine structures and processes related to communication between fans, the media, football clubs and the public. Habermas' theory is draw upon using the concepts of “colonization of the Lifeworld” and “communicative action” to inform a theme and discourse analysis of official and independent football club websites and media reports. How corporate interests (the system) are manipulating public opinion and freedom to speak openly within an overall goal of profit maximization for club owners and the large media corporations are explored.

Findings

Although steps to enable free communication have been made we are still a long way off supporters having a powerful enough voice to organise against the commercial power of the large football clubs and media conglomerates. The ideal speech situation remains elusive and the hegemonic state remains unchallenged. Football supporters are increasingly constructed as “consumers” and the ultimate power remains in mass media and broadcast rather than personal “narrowcast”.

Originality/value

This paper extends debate on the impact of the developing “digital culture” focusing on football supporters, a specific and prevalent community within British society. It raises issues for further research in this area.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Kate Holmes, Rachel McLean and Gill Green

The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of how independent craftspeople adopt and use social media (SM) in order to promote their creative enterprise…

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802

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of how independent craftspeople adopt and use social media (SM) in order to promote their creative enterprise. However, some of these opportunities may place a demand for specific knowledge, business and technical skills on untrained artists. The purpose of this paper is to look into this emerging phenomena, the challenges and opportunities it presents and to propose solutions or recommendations to independent artists, training organisations, and government bodies who may wish to promote the creative industries.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify different modes of adoption of SM and some of the related challenges within this domain, interviews were conducted with independent craftspeople in order to explore these topics and identify emergent themes. The research focuses on an ethnographic study through an interpretive lens; Habermas' theory of communicative action is drawn on to explore the adoption and use of technology by craftspeople to promote their work and business.

Findings

The paper identifies some of the most current challenges for the independent craftsperson in adopting SM to promote and sell products. While participants are aware of benefits of SM technologies, lack of time, lack of technical knowledge and unfamiliarity with new media technologies are all highlighted as barriers to adoption. Proposed recommendations include training and support offered by government development agencies, and cooperatives employing social media experts.

Research limitations/implications

Situated within the context of an ongoing ethnographic study, this study was a specific episode carried out at a craft fair to investigate the specific theme of SM adoption for product promotion. Given more time further interviews could be carried out to include a greater range of participants. Craftspeople who work entirely out of a workshop and do not attend events such as craft fairs could be interviewed to give further insight. A future study will present an analysis of the content of web sites, third party portals and social media posts to understand the interactions that take place through web technologies and social media.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper can be used in shaping support solutions for independent craftspeople wishing to adopt SM as a method of promoting their product or craft. The discovered challenges may be used to identify potential problems of the Internet and SM for the independent craftsperson. Findings can also be used to inform hosts of e‐commerce sites for independent artists, they may also be used to inform government and funding bodies.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Hui‐Chih Wang and Her‐Sen Doong

Taiwan is one of several leading countries in the mobile music context. Accordingly, Taiwan's experiences in promoting mobile music service diffusion are of importance and…

Abstract

Purpose

Taiwan is one of several leading countries in the mobile music context. Accordingly, Taiwan's experiences in promoting mobile music service diffusion are of importance and interest to international practitioners and researchers. Applying Rogers' innovation diffusion theory, this study aims to employ econometric models to investigate whether the diffusion of mobile music service adoption is affected by external influences (e.g. mass media advertising, salespeople, and service providers), internal influences (e.g. interactions and imitations among acquaintances), or a combination of such influences.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine which influence best explained the diffusion of mobile music adoptions, the external, internal, and Von Bertalanffy mixed influence diffusion models were tested in this study. GNUS, a strongly functional language and environment to statistically explore data sets, was used to estimate the parameters of each model. The performance of each diffusion model was then examined using the Akaike AIC and Schwarz BIC statistics.

Findings

Findings indicated that the Von Bertalanffy mixed influences model best describes the diffusion pattern of mobile music service adoption and that acquaintances' influence in terms of interactions is the dominant factor influencing mobile music service adoption decision in Taiwan.

Originality/value

How managers of a mobile music service provider can use the internal and external influences interchangeably to effectively accelerate the mobile music diffusion at the different stage of product lifecycle is presented in this study. Indeed, the mobile music service is one of the most important industries worldwide not only because its penetration rate in many countries is over 50 percent, but also because of its killer applications. In light of this, the study contributes highly to theoretical and empirical examinations because the diffusion of the mobile music services within a society is the essence of the development/usage of the m‐commerce or music industries.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Kate Holmes, Anita Greenhill and Rachel McLean

The purpose of this study is to gain insight into craft and do-it-yourself (DIY) communities of practice (COPs) and how the use of technology provides ways for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gain insight into craft and do-it-yourself (DIY) communities of practice (COPs) and how the use of technology provides ways for participants to connect, share and create. Gaining deeper insights into the practices of these communities may provide new opportunities to utilise within this flourishing domain.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods were adopted to collect data and analysed through an interpretivist lens. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of craft and DIY COPs to gain a deep understanding of the broader ethnographic study. Existing theoretical perspectives surrounding COPs have been applied to further current perspectives.

Findings

Findings from this study suggest that being part of a COP allows participants to connect to others, build creative enterprise and learn or enhance skills. Insights gained from this study indicate some of the detailed ways in which the application of technology redefines craft and DIY COPs.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a succinct exploration of a vast and fluid domain; if presented with more time and wider resources, the research would include further exploration of virtual COPs.

Originality/value

The investigation provides a rich insight into the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) within craft and DIY COPs. The application of theoretical perspectives from the area of Information Systems (IS) and Technology Management to this domain is regarded as an original research and furthers knowledge in these areas.

Originality/value

The investigation provides a rich insight into the use of ICTs within craft and DIY COPs. The application of theoretical perspectives from the area of IS to the domain of craft and DIY culture is original research and extends existing concepts to include skills sharing as a previously unexplored domain.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Nick Letch and Jennie Carroll

This paper seeks to highlight a poorly‐understood dimension of digital exclusion that is not related to access to information and communication technologies (ICTs), but…

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1276

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight a poorly‐understood dimension of digital exclusion that is not related to access to information and communication technologies (ICTs), but rather to the reduction in flexibility for providing and administering public services following the implementation of an integrated e‐government system.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a project focused on reducing barriers to the delivery of driver licensing services to a remote indigenous community in Australia was undertaken and the data were analysed using Kling et al.'s socio‐technical interaction network (STIN) modelling approach.

Findings

The paper makes four recommendations to improve the licensing situation for the community that are induced from the findings. In particular the paper draws attention to the need to carefully analyse possible negative impacts of any e‐government initiative for those at the margins of society.

Research limitations/implications

The paper aims to analyse the current situation as the foundation for recommending future actions. These can form the basis for subsequent interventions in the licensing situation.

Practical implications

This research provides an outsiders' overview of the licensing situation and recommendations for change that take account of a diversity of viewpoints and interests.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to our understanding of the relationship between ICTs and social exclusion in three ways. It provides a rich narrative describing the secondary impacts of integrated e‐government systems, a theoretically grounded analysis of the situation and some recommendations for addressing some of the implications at both the community level as well as calling for more careful evaluation of possible negative consequences about shifting service provision to integrated systems.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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