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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Magdalini Vasileiou and Jennifer Rowley

The purpose of this paper is to report research into the marketing and promotion of e‐books, and use this as a case study context to generate insights into approaches in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report research into the marketing and promotion of e‐books, and use this as a case study context to generate insights into approaches in academic libraries to the marketing of new services. As such it contributes to the limited empirical research on both the introduction of e‐book services and on marketing in academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 25 academic librarians, in seven case study libraries, holding the following posts: subject librarians, e‐resources librarians, or cataloguers. Interviews focussed on: the existence of a promotion/marketing strategy for e‐books; the marketing and promotion tools used to promote e‐books; promotion via academics; the issues and challenges in promoting e‐books; and future plans for the promotion of e‐books.

Findings

None of the libraries had a marketing communication strategy relating to e‐books, yet, on the other hand, most interviewees were able to point to a range of tools used to promote e‐books, and some had plans for improvements in their promotion activities.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates a laissez faire approach to the marketing of potentially significant new services from academic libraries – providing access to e‐books. Recommendations for development focus on taking a strategic approach to marketing and promotion, managing tensions between promotion and supply, innovation in promotional tools, and influencing word‐of‐mouth.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 67 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Gordon Wills, Sherril H. Kennedy, John Cheese and Angela Rushton

To achieve a full understanding of the role ofmarketing from plan to profit requires a knowledgeof the basic building blocks. This textbookintroduces the key concepts in…

Abstract

To achieve a full understanding of the role of marketing from plan to profit requires a knowledge of the basic building blocks. This textbook introduces the key concepts in the art or science of marketing to practising managers. Understanding your customers and consumers, the 4 Ps (Product, Place, Price and Promotion) provides the basic tools for effective marketing. Deploying your resources and informing your managerial decision making is dealt with in Unit VII introducing marketing intelligence, competition, budgeting and organisational issues. The logical conclusion of this effort is achieving sales and the particular techniques involved are explored in the final section.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

June-Hyuk Kwon, Seung-Hye Jung, Hyun-Ju Choi and Joonho Kim

This study aims to empirically analyze the effects of marketing communications, such as advertisement/promotion and social network service (SNS) content, on consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically analyze the effects of marketing communications, such as advertisement/promotion and social network service (SNS) content, on consumer engagement (CE), brand trust and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s participants were 230 US and 376 Korean consumers who have used (i.e. contacted) a food service establishment (i.e. family restaurant) at least once before and who continue to use an SNS (e.g. Facebook and Instagram). This study conducted a hypothesis test using structural equation modeling analysis. In addition, hierarchical analysis was performed to further generalize and support the statistical analysis results.

Findings

Advertisement/promotion and SNS content have a statistically significant positive effect on CE. Advertisement/promotion has a statistically significant positive effect on brand trust, and SNS content has a statistically significant negative effect on brand trust. CE has a statistically significant positive effect on brand trust, and CE and brand trust have a statistically significant positive effect on brand loyalty. No statistically significant differences were shown between the US and Korean consumer groups (critical ratios for difference of path coefficient < ± 1.96). The hypothesis test results of the structural equation model analysis and hierarchical analysis were the same for the entire group.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that the overall mediating role of CE is important. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate which marketing communication channels are most effective in the restaurant sector.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Mohsen Ali Murshid and Zurina Mohaidin

The purpose of this paper is to examine reported literature on the influence of medical representatives (MRs) and other promotional tools on drug prescribing behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine reported literature on the influence of medical representatives (MRs) and other promotional tools on drug prescribing behaviour, and to assess whether this effect is different in developed and developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of the literature was conducted across online databases from 2000 to 2016. Eligible studies addressed MRs and other promotion tools used to influence drug prescribing in developed and developing countries.

Findings

A total of 40 reviewed studies met the inclusion requirements. In total, 22 of the studies were conducted in developed countries and 18 in developing countries. Out of ten studies that examined the influence of MRs on drug prescribing in developed countries, eight found a positive influence, one found only moderate and one finds no influence. Analogous results were found in developing countries. Six out of ten studies on the influence of MRs conducted in developing countries found a positive effect, three found only moderate effects, while one finds no influence. The influence of promotion tools on prescribing varied in developed countries, five found positive influence, four reported a small effect and one found negative influence. In developing countries, the size of effect also varied, five studies found positive influence of promotion tools on drug prescribing behaviour, five found a negligible or small effect, and one found no association. However, marked differences were observed between two sectors. In the developed countries, MRs are valued as a source of information and can have an effect on prescribing, while it is unreliable in developing countries. Sample drugs are more generally seen as an important promotional tool for prescribing in developed countries than developing countries.

Research limitations/implications

The results derived from this review are based on studies with varying methodological consistency. The review provides the crucial information that will be valuable to researchers working on comparative analysis of marketing efforts in developing and developed countries.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few systematic reviews on the influence of MRs and other promotional tools on prescribing. It compares the influence of MRs and promotional efforts in both developed and developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Mark Aaron Polger and Karen Okamoto

The purpose of this paper is to explore the responsibilities and challenges faced by academic librarians whose major responsibilities include the overall promotion of the library.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the responsibilities and challenges faced by academic librarians whose major responsibilities include the overall promotion of the library.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was sent to seven library listservs asking respondents to describe their work duties, promotional activities, academic background, and professional challenges and concerns.

Findings

This study garnered 215 responses. Respondents who completed the questionnaire identified as academic librarians whose major responsibilities include the overall promotion of the library. Librarians who promote face a plethora of challenges, including time restraints, lack of funding and limited support for their promotional efforts. These barriers place a strain on promotional work in academic libraries.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates the roles and responsibilities of librarians who promote and the challenges and obstacles they deal with on an institutional and departmental level.

Originality/value

This study provides a unique snapshot of marketing initiatives across various academic libraries, in the midst of a global economic recession.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Kim‐Shyan Fam, Bill Merrilees, James E. Richard, Laszlo Jozsa, Yongqiang Li and Jayne Krisjanous

The purpose of this paper is to examine two key dimensions of in‐store marketing, namely in‐store promotions and price markdowns. These seem to be the two most important…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two key dimensions of in‐store marketing, namely in‐store promotions and price markdowns. These seem to be the two most important aspects of in‐store marketing, though other dimensions such as retail personal service are also worthy of study.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 287 New Zealand clothing and shoe retailers was studied. Survey questions included the perceived importance of in‐store promotions and price markdowns. The aim was to explain these perceptions in terms of marketing strategies, threat of competition and environmental uncertainty.

Findings

The results indicate that a discount marketing strategy, environmental uncertainty and emphasis on price‐promotions are key to explaining retailers' perceptions and use of specific in‐store marketing activities. In addition, seven key marketing activities were found to distinguish high‐ and low‐performance retailers with respect to in‐store promotions.

Practical implications

The study has highlighted strategic aspects of in‐store marketing, by focusing on two key components of in‐store marketing, namely in‐store promotion and price markdowns. The findings should provide much needed advice to retailers on the use of sales promotion tools in different environmental settings.

Originality/value

This paper should prove valuable to academic researchers and retailing managers (particularly to those in smaller countries), owner‐operated retail outlets, and chain stores.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Thomas A. Petit and Martha R. McEnally

The promotion mix is the combination of personal selling, advertising, and sales promotion used to achieve marketing objectives. The objective‐and‐task method is used in…

Abstract

The promotion mix is the combination of personal selling, advertising, and sales promotion used to achieve marketing objectives. The objective‐and‐task method is used in practice to develop a single promotion mix plan. This is practical but has drawbacks: (1) only one promotion strategy and mix is considered, and (2) decision making is taken out of the hands of senior marketing management. This paper sets forth a decision‐making process by which alternative promotion strategies and mixes are generated so that senior marketing management can choose the one that is most promising.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Jacinta Hawkins, Sandy Bulmer and Lynne Eagle

The purpose of this paper is to argue that integrated marketing communications (IMC) must be used in social marketing, like it is in commercial marketing, by illustrating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that integrated marketing communications (IMC) must be used in social marketing, like it is in commercial marketing, by illustrating that IMC principles are effective in social marketing contexts within an education setting. Specifically, the paper provides evidence of IMC being successfully used in the communication of school‐based health promotion activities within health promoting schools (HPS).

Design/methodology/approach

Depth interviews with principals and teachers at three case schools were conducted to investigate the communication of health promotion programmes within HPS. In total, 19 people participated in this study.

Findings

A key finding was that IMC principles are evident in the HPS philosophy of health promotion. That is, the extent to which health concepts are customer focused and integrated into school life; and, communication which is synergistic and based on stakeholder needs, has a significant impact upon achieving desired health promotion outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This research explored communication within the specific context of HPS. To further explore the application of IMC in social marketing, the authors recommend that other social marketing contexts or cases be investigated.

Practical implications

The fact that IMC principles are relevant and effective when facilitating school‐based health promotion programmes implies that IMC would offer value to other social marketing contexts too.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in that we provide evidence of IMC used in a school‐based social marketing context. The context of an education setting for this research broadens existing understanding of how IMC can and should be used in social marketing. The research offers insights for social marketing practitioners seeking to improve their communications efforts.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Sue Peattie

Over the last thirty years, wine has taken an increasingly large share of the UK alcoholic drinks market with sales volume growing at a rate of 4.2% per annum. However…

Abstract

Over the last thirty years, wine has taken an increasingly large share of the UK alcoholic drinks market with sales volume growing at a rate of 4.2% per annum. However, although the market has expanded there is now increasing competitiveness within this market from the new wine producing areas. More recently, competition is emerging from new drinks such as speciality beers and alcoholic soft drinks. The implications for the wine marketer is that there is a need to make full use of all the ‘tools’ within the marketing management toolkit. One of the most popular responses for marketers under competitive pressure in a range of industries is sales promotion. But despite being popular, sales promotion is poorly understood compared to advertising. This is partly because it has never enjoyed the academic scrutiny afforded to the more glamorous field of advertising. However, promotional techniques are now being studied individually and their appropriateness for different markets and marketing tasks is being discussed. Price‐based promotions have been the most popular in the drinks market, as in many other markets, but there is growing awareness that non‐price based promotions can add value for the consumer while meeting a range of marketing communications objectives. This article looks at the use of consumer competitions, one of the most popular non‐price promotional tools, with a survey of 319 competitions run by the drinks industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Sungil Lee and Shijin Yoo

The purpose of this paper is twofold – the first is to explore the key actions that enabled Pizza Hut Korea (PHK) to come out of a nine‐year decline in sales and profits…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold – the first is to explore the key actions that enabled Pizza Hut Korea (PHK) to come out of a nine‐year decline in sales and profits. The second purpose is to delve deeper into the concept of return on marketing as applied to the turnaround of Pizza Hut Korea, using customer lifetime value (LTV) and the related return on marketing investment (ROMI) principles that were instrumental in turning around the business.

Design/methodology/approach

The main method used is interviews with company senior management, reviews of internal company data as well as external data and literature reviews of existing theories on return on marketing. The case uses a specific promotional decision that senior management must make to review the decision methodologies using return on marketing. This quantified return estimate is then combined with marketing and business strategic considerations to review the decision that management should make regarding the promotion. In addition, the detailed executive interviews shed light on the approaches taken by the senior management to effect a change in culture as well as the disciplined business reviews that were put in place to improve the financial performance. Finally the case describes the marketing insights that led the firm to implement their consumer promotions to help turn the business around.

Findings

Turning around a business that has been in decline for a long time requires not just keen consumer insight and excellent marketing tactics, it is a combination of changing the culture of the company and mindset of the leaders along with instilling disciplined financial processes and driving consumer insight driven strategies. In particular, this study focuses on the role of quantified marketing investment return model that helped to drive a fact‐based, data‐driven decision‐making process that, combined with strategic insight, helped to turn the business around. The lifetime value and return on marketing investment model employed by Pizza Hut Korea provides a starting framework for analyzing marketing investment returns that can be adapted by many other companies.

Originality/value

Though there has been research conducted in many turnaround situations, there has been virtually no work done to examine the turnaround strategies employed using key marketing return metrics. In addition, the study provides value in that it examines the totality of management principles employed (cultural, organizational, financial, marketing) to drive innovation and change. This study will be useful for those that seek to better understand the key principles involved in turning around a business but with particular emphasis on quantified marketing returns analysis using return on marketing investment method.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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