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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2022

Patricia Virella

This paper aims to highlight how a group of novice principals in Connecticut and New York used relational, dispositional and situational factors to respond to the COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight how a group of novice principals in Connecticut and New York used relational, dispositional and situational factors to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. The study aims to support new principals and educational leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Mutch's (2015) dispositional, relational and situational framework to guide the inquiry, this paper uses qualitative methods and interviewing in particular to explore the questions of interest. Six novice principals were each interviewed over the 2020–2021 school year, each interview lasting approximately forty-five minutes. Data were analyzed thematically using both deductive coding techniques and cross comparative analysis.

Findings

Findings show that novice principals tended to rely on dispositional factors to respond to the crisis. Additionally, novice principals reported limited responses to the situational factors of the crisis due to restricted access and guidance from the district leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small sample size and methodological approach, it may be inappropriate to generalize the findings across all novice principals in all settings. Further research in additional settings and larger samples are encouraged to support the proposed findings.

Practical implications

This paper has several implications for districts and leadership preparation programs. Among these is the need for leadership preparation programs to adjust their curricula to train new principals properly.

Originality/value

This work fills a gap in the research regarding how new principals respond to a crisis. It also provides insights into practice and possible means to enhance the growing population of new principals entering the educational leadership workforce.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Gökhan Arastaman and Aslı Çetinkaya

The aim of this study is to better understand how principals in Turkey perceive and navigate overwhelming stress and to identify leadership practices that enable coping…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to better understand how principals in Turkey perceive and navigate overwhelming stress and to identify leadership practices that enable coping with stress during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study was used to gain an in-depth understanding of the stress factors, coping strategies and leadership experiences that the principals faced during the pandemic through semi-structured interviews with 12 school principals.

Findings

The results of the research showed that the stressors perceived by the principals were reflected in their leadership practices. The leadership practices of the principals in this period were interpreted as their reactions to perceived stressors. In addition, ensuring the self-care and well-being of principals has been evaluated as a prerequisite for successful crisis leadership. Leadership practices that are effective in achieving crisis leadership in the context of the pandemic are explained.

Practical implications

Implications were made for the development of a comprehensive theory of crisis leadership that focuses on the well-being of school leaders and the development of leadership skills. Further empirical research on how leadership is achieved in different types of crises is recommended.

Originality/value

Our research contributes to the existing knowledge and school leaders about how crisis leadership is achieved by revealing the complexity and multidimensional structure of school leadership in the context of the pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Nahed Abdelrahman, Beverly J. Irby, Rafael Lara-Alecio, Fuhui Tong and Hamada Elfarargy

The purpose of this study was to explore intrinsic and extrinsic motivations that led 28 teachers of emergent bilingual (EB) students to seek a master's in educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore intrinsic and extrinsic motivations that led 28 teachers of emergent bilingual (EB) students to seek a master's in educational administration with a focus on bilingual/English as a second language (ESL).

Design/methodology/approach

To address the study objectives, the authors used a qualitative phenomenological design. The authors conducted online interviews with 28 teachers of EBs. The authors used the self-determination theory as the theoretical framework.

Findings

Primarily, teachers of EBs were intrinsically motivated to seek the principalship. The authors identified additional motivators that were not found in the previous literature which heretofore was based on general education teachers' responses. Those motivators were, gain advice from mentors, promote cultural awareness, commit to a campus-wide impact, increase awareness of the importance of bilingual/ESL education programs, and foster a relationship with the school community.

Practical implications

Identifying the intrinsic and extrinsic motivators for teachers of EBs who desire to move into a principal position may aid faculty in university principal preparation programs and administrators in school districts to support and mentor these teachers to better serve as leaders in high need schools.

Originality/value

There is little known about intrinsic and extrinsic motivations of teachers of EBs which influence their decisions to change their career paths to become principals.

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Linda J. Searby and Denise Armstrong

The purpose of this paper is to introduce readers to the special issue on “middle space” education leaders (those individuals who are second-in-command in schools). The…

742

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce readers to the special issue on “middle space” education leaders (those individuals who are second-in-command in schools). The special issue contains papers pertaining to mentoring those preparing for and aspiring to the assistant school leader role, as well as papers on programs that support new assistant principals/vice-principals through mentoring and coaching. The authors provide background on middle space leadership and mentoring from existing research literature, introduce the international papers selected for the issue, and identify unifying themes across the papers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide highlights of relevant research literature on the importance of mentoring for school leaders in general, but also specifically address the need for mentoring for middle space leaders from the scant literature that exists on the topic. After reviewing the relevant literature, the authors provide an overview of the seven papers that were chosen for the issue through a rigorous peer-review process.

Findings

The co-editors of this special issue identify common themes that emerged from the papers chosen for the issue. In general, authors note that middle space leaders have unique mentoring and coaching needs, and there are few formal programs that address their needs. However, there is a growing awareness of the need to support assistant principals through structured mentoring programs, as well as preparing and mentoring those who aspire to the position.

Research limitations/implications

The seven papers chosen for the special issue represent a variety of research methodologies. A limitation is that the majority of the studies are qualitative, with small sample populations. However, even with small sample sizes, commonalities can be seen across the studies and across international contexts.

Practical implications

This review summarizes the issues facing middle space leaders in education and how they can be effectively addressed. The global audience that can benefit from engaging with the papers in this special issue includes educational leadership faculty, educational governing bodies, policymakers, school district central office personnel, senior principals, and assistant principals themselves.

Originality/value

This paper and the seven that follow extend the scant research literature in the realm of middle space leaders in education. They provide unique insights – from different international contexts including the USA, Canada, Hong Kong, and New Zealand – into the need for and potential benefits of mentoring and coaching aspiring and new middle space leaders.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

M.T. Hewitson

Reports on a research project which investigated the preparation ofbeginning principals in Queensland primary and secondary governmentschools. Thirty‐six principals

340

Abstract

Reports on a research project which investigated the preparation of beginning principals in Queensland primary and secondary government schools. Thirty‐six principals completed a questionnaire, a return rate of about 80 per cent. Of these principals, 13 were surveyed early in the second year of their principalship, and 23 in August of their first year. Six of the first‐year principals were interviewed in the following month. Presents an overview of the findings, along with some general observations on their practical implications and recommendations for action.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

DOUG OGILVIE

At role conferences, high school deputy principals are continually re‐examining their role in the schools. Increasingly, in school level co‐operative evaluation programmes…

Abstract

At role conferences, high school deputy principals are continually re‐examining their role in the schools. Increasingly, in school level co‐operative evaluation programmes they are analyzing their work and its contribution to school effectiveness. This paper attempts to develop a classification that would provide a useful framework within which, at both system level and school level, they might examine their behaviour and consider modifications. From a Queensland study, five dimensions of leader behaviour are identified. They are Consideration, Classroom Facilitation, Staff Utilization, Authoritarianism and Routinisation. Other behaviours identified from the literature are Teacher Classroom Contact and School Management Maintenance tasks. These seven behaviours can involve interaction with either of two groups of people; clients and colleagues, thus providing a 14 segment grid that deputies might use to classify their behaviour when considering what they are doing in schools and what might be done better.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Mary M. Harris and Donald J. Willower

Hypotheses on principals’ optimism, teacher perceptions of that optimism, and of school effectiveness were tested. The school was the unit of analysis. Teachers and…

1266

Abstract

Hypotheses on principals’ optimism, teacher perceptions of that optimism, and of school effectiveness were tested. The school was the unit of analysis. Teachers and principals in 50 secondary schools responded to two standard measures. To avoid same respondent bias, about half of the teachers in each school completed one instrument, half the other. Teacher perceptions of their principal’s optimism and of their school’s effectiveness were correlated, but the principal’s self‐reported optimism was not a predictor of perceived effectiveness. The congruence of teacher perceptions of the principal’s optimism and the measured optimism was associated with perceived school effectiveness. Teachers saw the principals to be less optimistic than the principals scored; however, teacher perceptions of optimism and self‐reported optimism were correlated across schools. We suggested explanations for this unusual combination of significant difference with significant correlation, and for other findings

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Laurie Brady

Reports on a peer assistance programme for principals involving training, observation and feedback. The sample, from three administrative regions for schooling in NSW…

978

Abstract

Reports on a peer assistance programme for principals involving training, observation and feedback. The sample, from three administrative regions for schooling in NSW Australia, involved nine pairs of principals, matched by age, experience as a principal and school size. The principals were trained in how and what to observe, and how to provide feedback. They then shadowed each other for two consecutive days prior to providing that feedback. Data were obtained from principal ratings and journals, researcher observation and interviews. Reports the findings in terms of an overall rating by principals, claimed benefits and limitations, the perceived value of training and the criteria for effective matching. Endorses the efficacy of peer assistance as a form of professional development.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Bruce G. Barnett

The hectic and fast‐paced nature of principals′ jobs oftenprohibits them from learning directly from their on‐the‐job experiences.Nevertheless, having the opportunity to…

Abstract

The hectic and fast‐paced nature of principals′ jobs often prohibits them from learning directly from their on‐the‐job experiences. Nevertheless, having the opportunity to observe and interview a peer partner can allow principals to become more knowledgeable and reflective about their practice as school administrators. One such programme that encourages knowledge generation and reflection is peer‐assisted leadership (PAL), where principals shadow one another and conduct reflective interviews. The increased self‐knowledge and knowledge of the role of school administrators which principals gain as they engage in personal and vicarious experiential learning is described. In addition, the programme encourages the integration of theory and practice as principals compare a conceptual frame‐work of instructional leadership with the observed realities of their jobs. Principals′ reactions reveal their concern about being isolated from other administrators, their need for information that is immediately relevant, their desire to use alternative observation and feedback strategies with teachers, their frustration as instructional leaders, and their concern with being unfairly criticised by their superiors and others.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Richard D. Bingham, Paul A. Haubrich and Sammis B. White

Explores the question of why principals rate their schools morehighly than do their own teachers. Following the work of others, showingthat disagreements between teachers…

Abstract

Explores the question of why principals rate their schools more highly than do their own teachers. Following the work of others, showing that disagreements between teachers and principals stem mainly from disagreements on discipline, reports on results which show that views on disciplinary policy are the only factor which is strong enough to overcome the somewhat biased grading by principals. Concludes that, if a principal wants higher teacher morale and higher grading of their school, efforts must be made to develop greater congruence between teacher and principal expectations and actions on discipline.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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