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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Jacob Hallencreutz and Dawn‐Marie Turner

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether there are some existing widespread and common models and definitions for organizational change best practice in the literature.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether there are some existing widespread and common models and definitions for organizational change best practice in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on previous research to define a model of evidence‐based change management base practice. A structured literature review is used to search for contemporary models and definitions of organizational change best practice.

Findings

No consistent definitions of organizational change best practice are to be found in the literature.

Originality/value

The paper provides a snapshot of the current literature on organizational change best practice. Implications of the findings on organizational change best practice are discussed and further research suggested.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Lindsay Stoetzel and Sandra Taylor-Marshall

Across K–12 settings, instructional coaching continues to flourish as an approach to teacher professional development intended to address long-standing inequities in…

Abstract

Purpose

Across K–12 settings, instructional coaching continues to flourish as an approach to teacher professional development intended to address long-standing inequities in student achievement. Yet, coaching models differ in how to conceptualize change or transformation as a result of coaching efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study problematizes the concept of change within one practice-based coaching program, by positing the possibilities of striving for transformational change directed at addressing educational inequities.

Findings

Qualitative methods reveal how coaching belief statements guide the burgeoning identities of beginning coaches to align to (and at times extend beyond) coaching for change through the lens of teacher practice.

Practical implications

Implications describe ways that coaching programs might utilize reflection and analysis activities to foster more equity-oriented coaching identities, regardless of coaching model.

Originality/value

Designing and facilitating authentic learning opportunities for coaches to reflect, rehearse, connect, and apply knowledge to practice as they develop their own understanding of what it means to coach for change is crucial.

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Mark Addleson

Working to improve organizations is the mainstay of organization development (OD) practice and includes figuring out the sources of workplace disruptions and dysfunctions…

Abstract

Working to improve organizations is the mainstay of organization development (OD) practice and includes figuring out the sources of workplace disruptions and dysfunctions. Casting aside the focus of most change-management initiatives, the organization, organizing intelligence (OQ) relies on paying attention to what people actually do, making meaning of complex, messy human-social organizing activities, in the interests of fostering productive workplaces. Resting on dialog with and among participants “feeling their way” as they organize their work, OQ is an exercise in synthesis rather than analysis. A holistic understanding of organizing activities is helped by exploring the roles of a triad of closely interwoven factors – organizing structures, work-practices, and relationships – in how people get things done, while understanding how these are interconnected. This chapter examines why the capacity for OQ matters, why and how OQ differs from widely practiced, technically framed, organizational analysis, and what distinguishes people with OQ from those with a more conventional interest in organizational change. A case study of the Dutch home-nursing organization, Buurtzorg, illustrates OQ in practice. With small groups of nurses who self-organize, this is a structure that changes both the way people work and their relationships, to the benefit of nurses and the quality of life and care of their patients, while reducing costs; clearly an example of a more productive workplace.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2006

Evelyn Fenton and Andrew Pettigrew

This chapter examines the impact of adopting a global strategy upon leaders’ roles and identities in an engineering consultancy firm. Drawing upon process and social…

Abstract

This chapter examines the impact of adopting a global strategy upon leaders’ roles and identities in an engineering consultancy firm. Drawing upon process and social practice perspectives on leadership; our results explain leaders’ resistance to changing practices despite major process changes as due to the threats to their identity caused by the new role requirements to implement a global strategy. Our emerging process and social practice model of leadership highlights the complementary nature of process and practice change, creates a distinction between good and malign ambiguity in professional services firms and has implications for regulating the pace and timing of major changes which impact upon professional identities.

Details

Professional Service Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-302-0

Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

David Seidl, Tanja Ohlson and Richard Whittington

This paper develops the practice-driven institutionalist perspective by introducing the concept of “restless practices.” Drawing on the practice theory of Theodore…

Abstract

This paper develops the practice-driven institutionalist perspective by introducing the concept of “restless practices.” Drawing on the practice theory of Theodore Schatzki, the authors distinguish practices by their “teloi”: some practices are devoted to replication, others are restlessly aimed at change. These restless practices are themselves composed of constitutive practices orientated toward “collecting,” “selecting” and “directing.” The authors illustrate restless practices and their constitutive practices by drawing on examples from consulting and standard-setting, both repeatedly generators of purposive, field-level change. The authors conclude that practice-driven institutionalism can accommodate change originating both from local improvisatory activities on the ground and from the designs of restless practices oriented toward fields at large.

Details

On Practice and Institution: Theorizing the Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-413-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

Ruthanne Huising

Organizations that adopt new practices employ managers to make decisions about how to materialize these practices. I examine how these managers move between the meanings…

Abstract

Organizations that adopt new practices employ managers to make decisions about how to materialize these practices. I examine how these managers move between the meanings and resources found in extra-local and local realms. I find that managers’ practices shift over time from adapting BPR practices to inhabiting BPR as an idea. Managers’ approaches are shaped by each organization’s history of efforts to introduce extra-local ideas. Rather than adapting BPR practices, managers draw on change tools, techniques, and methods that have worked in the organization and integrate BPR work into ongoing interactions, activities, and language in the local context.

Details

The Structuring of Work in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-436-5

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Ulla-Maija Sutinen

The paper aims to elucidate the potential of a socio-cultural approach to social marketing. Drawing on a practice-theoretical understanding of change, the paper discusses…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to elucidate the potential of a socio-cultural approach to social marketing. Drawing on a practice-theoretical understanding of change, the paper discusses how a socio-cultural approach can inform social marketing and enhance the possibilities of the field to address complex, multifaceted issues that require changes beyond the individual.

Design/methodology/approach

While the paper is conceptual in nature, it uses an illustrative example of food waste as the basis for an investigation of what a socio-cultural approach, rooted in practice-theoretical understanding of change, means for social marketing.

Findings

The paper is conceptual in nature but highlights new opportunities for social marketing connected to a socio-cultural approach foregrounding practice changes. The paper introduces potential roles that social marketers can adopt to initiate and support practice changes in the context of food waste.

Practical implications

The paper emphasises the importance of focussing on the socio-culture and practices connected to the issue in question, both when scoping for insight and when developing the ways to address it.

Originality/value

By integrating a practice-theoretical understanding of change, social marketing and food waste literature, the paper offers novel insights about the potential of adopting a socio-cultural approach to social marketing. The paper discusses a socio-cultural approach to social marketing in context, emphasising the roles social marketers can play in practice changes.

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Carina Roemer, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele and Patricia David

Social marketing theories have habituated to a theoretical and methodological focus that is criticised for being myopic and stigmatising. Following recommendations to…

Abstract

Purpose

Social marketing theories have habituated to a theoretical and methodological focus that is criticised for being myopic and stigmatising. Following recommendations to redirect focus theoretically, the purpose of this paper is to apply an observational methodology to understanding how project stakeholders interact to examine whether consideration of stakeholders can identify factors facilitating or impeding farming practice change.

Design/methodology/approach

More than 48 events involving as many as 150 people including project stakeholder meetings, one-on-one consultations and annual events were observed over more than 100 h by between one and five researchers. Field notes were gathered, and thematic coding focussed on understanding how stakeholders facilitated or impeded practice change.

Findings

Observations identified limited provision of information about the project by on ground project stakeholders to targeted individuals (farmers). On the rare occasions where information sharing was observed, communication was delayed making it difficult for individuals to connect actions with outcomes observed. Participating stakeholders did not freely support delivery of activities needed for individual practice change.

Practical implications

This study indicates the value of wider process and outcome assessment encompassing stakeholders to identify factors impeding and facilitating farming practice change.

Social implications

Approaches that centre attention on individuals fail to acknowledge the inputs, activities and outputs delivered by project stakeholders within a system of change. By redirecting evaluation focus, shared responsibility is gained and stigmatisation of one stakeholder group can be avoided.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how observations can be used to redirect focus to consider actions and interactions occurring between on ground project stakeholders. A stakeholder evaluation approach extends monitoring and evaluation focus beyond individuals targeted for behaviour change. Implications, limitations and future research directions are outlined.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Age Rosenberg

This paper aims to discuss the role of communication in relieving tensions that can arise from organizational practices enacted during structural change. Practices

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the role of communication in relieving tensions that can arise from organizational practices enacted during structural change. Practices, according to Whittington (2006, p. 619), constitute shared routines of behaviour, including traditions, norms and procedures for thinking and acting.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees’ reflections regarding what, how and why certain circumstances occurred during the structural reform of an Estonian State Institution with approximately 300 employees, comprised the study data. Reflections were collected during 27 interviews conducted after recent change to the structure of this organization. After aggregating different actions, associations and emotions into practices, these practices were assigned to elements offered by Schatzki (2005), and tensions between the elements sought and analysed.

Findings

Analysis of the three practices extracted as forming part of the structural reform – management decision-making, recruitment and physical relocation – showed that in organizational settings, the constitutional role of communication within practices needs conscious attention at different levels of the practice. Tensions that arose between practice elements, e.g. rules or reasons for doing something not complying with ways of doing it, revealed the need for metacommunication regarding those elements.

Practical implications

Communication during organizational changes needs to be more than crafted messages via well-organized channels from the communications department; it needs to penetrate to all different levels before, during and after a change. All that to create as many opportunities for employees at all levels to collectively make sense of what is happening and for the management to make necessary changes based on that. It should be created consciously by for example inviting employees together in discussion circles during the planning phase of the change and outlining the key processes of the change in question with them involved.

Originality/value

The value of this study is in investigating what goes on in an organization by distancing oneself from the immediate behaviour of an individual to focus on patterns of action, which gives another understanding as to why even when people wish for the best, things often still do not turn out as hoped. This approach refers to the theory that there are tensions or mistakes coded into practices, thus allowing one to look at inter-personal communication as part of other actions, not as a separate line of actions.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Noora Jansson

The purpose of this paper is to challenge some taken-for-granted practices related to organizational change in order to understand how organizational change as practice is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge some taken-for-granted practices related to organizational change in order to understand how organizational change as practice is conditioned by mundane assumptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical analysis of the taken-for-granted assumptions revealed by a literature review was conducted utilizing practice theory approach in which human behavior and social context are intertwined. Hence, the analysis of this theoretical paper focuses on practices, praxis and practitioners in organizational change.

Findings

The results suggest that certain elements that are believed to be universal in organizational change are, in fact, particular within context. The key finding and message of this research is that organizational change in practice is a manifestation of particularity. The conclusion is that certain mundane assumptions condition organizational change practices by ignoring the importance of power, phronesis and paradox, which lie in human interaction within social context.

Research limitations/implications

The proposal that the dominating discourse on organizational change involves some taken-for-granted assumptions, challenges scholars to question the ways organizations are currently studied, and perhaps draws more attention to power, context and particularity in future research.

Practical implications

The analysis demonstrates that the social aspect of organizational realities is crucial in organizational change, and should not be underestimated by the practitioners in the process. This realism of practice complexity indicates that the pitfalls of organizational change are more context dependent and thus, more numerous than generally is assumed.

Originality/value

This research contributes to both theory and practice by offering a critical view on some of the taken-for-granted organizational change practices. This paper also demonstrates originality by introducing the concept of “organizational change as practice” in analogue of “strategy as practice” (SAP).

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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