Search results

1 – 10 of over 233000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Chris Edgelow

Changing the way organizations change has become the fourth and perhaps most pressing challenge every organization faces today. This insightful and practical paper aims to

3872

Abstract

Purpose

Changing the way organizations change has become the fourth and perhaps most pressing challenge every organization faces today. This insightful and practical paper aims to describe a holistic, integrated approach organizations can use to build the necessary leadership capacity required to ensure changes are both successful and sustainable over time.

Design/methodology/approach

Five decades of using change management as the standard approach to helping organizations change have left a legacy of many more failures than successes. Integrating the essential components of strategy, change, transition and communication, the paper outlines specific actions leaders at all levels must undertake to lead change successfully throughout their organization. Insights are gained from decades of work with hundreds of leaders in changing organizations around the world.

Findings

This integrated approach ensures the desired results are achieved within the given budgets and timelines, people come through the changes no worse off and the organization as a whole fulfills its strategic mandate. That is accomplished through the work of competent leadership continually dedicating time and effort at addressing the fourth challenge their organization faces – changing the way they change.

Originality/value

The most important competency every organization requires today is the ability to change and evolve to keep pace with the fluid, dynamic global environment. Old habits are no longer up to the task. This integrated approach to leading change builds the necessary leadership skills to help organizations learn how to sustain change successfully.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Bernard Burnes

Follows on from and develops the arguments presented in an earlier Management Decision article ‐ “No such thing as ... a ‘one best way’ to manage organizational change”…

7691

Abstract

Follows on from and develops the arguments presented in an earlier Management Decision article ‐ “No such thing as ... a ‘one best way’ to manage organizational change” (Burnes, 1996a). Begins by examining Burnes’ (1996b) Choice Management ‐ Change Management model which, in particular, draws attention to the influence on the choices an organization makes of the context in which it operates. Then moves on to discuss Miles and Snow′s (1978) classification of organizations into four strategic types. From this, argues that the choices an organization makes, regarding what to change and how to change it, will be significantly influenced by its strategic type. Concludes by maintaining that, on the one hand, organizations can create a virtuous circle whereby they can influence or control the circumstances in which they operate through the changes they make and how they make them. However, on the other hand, organizations can find themselves in a vicious spiral of decline and stagnation through an inability to control their own destiny and inconsistent and unsuccessful approaches to change.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Diana Whitney

Takes a social constructionist view of organizational change focusing on how to engage the multitude of internal and external stakeholders. Argues that current models of…

11387

Abstract

Takes a social constructionist view of organizational change focusing on how to engage the multitude of internal and external stakeholders. Argues that current models of change often leave people feeling demoralized and presents appreciative inquiry (AI) as an aproach to organization development that deliberately focuses attention on learning and dialogue about what gives life to an organization. Explains AI principles and the 4‐D model for positive change. Provides some examples of this.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Clinton O. Longenecker and Laurence S. Fink

This article reports the results of a study on management development practices in US service and manufacturing organizations. Data and statistical analyses from a sample…

4435

Abstract

This article reports the results of a study on management development practices in US service and manufacturing organizations. Data and statistical analyses from a sample of 433 middle and front‐line managers from 59 different US service and manufacturing organizations are reported which examined: What specific management development practices are most important from a manager’s perspective to improving their performance in rapidly changing organizations; and, are managers actually getting the development experiences they need to be effective in these organizations? Among the top ten important practices identified by managers as improving their performance, focus, feedback, and learning (e.g. problem solving, new communication and leadership) by experience are re‐occurring themes. The results also point to startling differences between the management development experiences they want and what they are actually getting from their organizations. Based on the data a series of lessons for improving the effectiveness of managers is provided.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

John W. Moran and Jeffrey M. Mead

Change is often brought about by an organization’s old ways being shown to be ineffective and inefficient in the currrent market environment. For most organizations this…

Abstract

Change is often brought about by an organization’s old ways being shown to be ineffective and inefficient in the currrent market environment. For most organizations this is usually found out too late in today’s rapid pace of Internet speed change. Organizations must approach change just as the most successful “techno‐individuals” have, by constantly reinventing and making minor changes, so they are always positioned for the next wave of change in the marketplace. Their workforces then view change as a phenomenon to embrace and not fear. It is normal to change if one is always doing it. Organizations must ask themselves “What do we need to change to be a fierce and flexible force in our marketplace?” “How have we changed this week? How must we change next week?”.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Chris Edgelow

The question of who is in charge of change is often met with confusing answers in changing organizations. That confusion is accompanied with a correspondingly poor ability

1186

Abstract

Purpose

The question of who is in charge of change is often met with confusing answers in changing organizations. That confusion is accompanied with a correspondingly poor ability to sustain change successfully. The purpose of this paper is to outline what is required to sustain constant, complex change and most importantly, who must be accountable.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on three decades of practical experience helping organizations change, it has become clear that unless a very small handful of groups inside a changing organization see themselves and are seen by everyone else as ultimately in charge of change, the organization will not be successful at sustaining constant change. The paper clarifies who those three groups are and what specific things they need to be accountable for to enable the organization to improve its ability to change successfully.

Findings

Many organizations attempt to in source or out source the responsibility for change to “change management” experts which usually leads to dismal results. The three essential groups that actually must own change are the executives, project teams and first level supervisors. Every other group involved plays a support function to those three groups who must be in charge of change.

Originality/value

When executives, project teams and first level supervisors align their efforts using an integrated approach to leading change, an organization significantly increases its capacity for sustaining successful change over the long haul. When an organization relies on external consulting firms, internal support functions or some combination of the two without having accountability for change resting with the three key groups, the capacity for change is compromised significantly.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Mike Schraeder, Rachel S. Tears and Mark H. Jordan

To provide two possible approaches for enhancing organizational culture awareness and promote cultural change in public sector organization. These approaches include…

16514

Abstract

Purpose

To provide two possible approaches for enhancing organizational culture awareness and promote cultural change in public sector organization. These approaches include training and leading by example.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature outlining fundamental aspects of organizational culture is summarized, serving as a foundation for reviewing the potential value of training as a method for enhancing public managers' awareness of organizational culture. This is followed by an illustrated example of how the culture was changed in major department of a public organization through leading by example.

Findings

Training and leading by example can serve as effective methodologies for promoting culture awareness and brining about culture change in organizations.

Practical implications

The article highlights some interesting similarities and differences between cultures in public organizations and cultures in private sector organizations. The differences, in particular, reinforce the importance of training and leading by example to guide public sector employees through the complex dynamics often embodied within culture transformations in organizations.

Originality/value

While there are some important similarities between cultures of private sector and public sector organizations, the differences existing in public sector organization cultures create unique challenges for managers trying to evoke change. The article provides a unique perspective on applying training and leading by example to the context of public sector organizational culture.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2022

Joseph Roh, Morgan Swink and Jeremy Kovach

The purpose of this study is to investigate how managers' abilities to design and implement organizational change initiatives affects supply chain (SC) responsiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how managers' abilities to design and implement organizational change initiatives affects supply chain (SC) responsiveness. Extant research focuses on specific process and resource options to address responsiveness, with only limited reference to managers' capabilities in adapting to new organization designs that organize processes and resources. Consequently, organizational theory that characterizes the implications of developing and implementing various designs is ignored. The study directly leverages organization adaption, organization design and the dynamic managerial capabilities literature to address the question of how to improve SC responsiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data are used to identify specific dynamic managerial capability constructs, as well as the expected relationships depicted in our conceptual model. The authors test these relationships using quantitative survey data collected from 199 SC leaders.

Findings

The authors find that capabilities in organization design, functional leader negotiations and workforce communications foster SC responsiveness via improved structural adaptability (SA). The findings explain how and when organization design actions impact SA and responsiveness, and more importantly, why managers should invest in developing a workforce communication capability as the foundation for organizational adaptability.

Originality/value

By applying organization adaption, organization design and dynamic managerial capabilities concepts, the research expands the existing study of responsiveness in the SC organizational context.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Danielle A. Tucker and Stefano Cirella

In the context of organizational change, identifying, and organizing the various roles of change agents remains a challenge for practitioners and scholars alike. This…

Abstract

In the context of organizational change, identifying, and organizing the various roles of change agents remains a challenge for practitioners and scholars alike. This chapter examines how different agents can enable an effective change process. Empirical evidence from three hospitals illustrates the process of transformation and its underlying arrangements to identify agents and their roles. The findings underline the importance of designing a coherent system of agents, determining where they come from, their role during the process, and how this may change throughout the change process. Managerial choices in the cases are discussed, leading to implications for theory and practice.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Gervase R. Bushe and Robert J. Marshak

Extending the argument made in Bushe and Marshak (2009) of the emergence of a new species of Organization Development (OD) that we label Dialogic, to differentiate it from…

Abstract

Extending the argument made in Bushe and Marshak (2009) of the emergence of a new species of Organization Development (OD) that we label Dialogic, to differentiate it from the foundational Diagnostic form, we argue that how any OD method is used in practice will be depend on the mindset of the practitioner. Six variants of Dialogic OD practice are reviewed and compared to aid in identification of a Weberian ideal-type Dialogic Mindset, consisting of eight premises that distinguish it from the foundational Diagnostic Mindset. Three core change processes that underlie all successful Dialogic OD processes are proposed, and suggestions for future research offered.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

1 – 10 of over 233000