Search results

1 – 10 of 19
Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Katherine T. Baggaley and Phillip C. Shon

Published over 30 years ago, Seductions of Crime has transformed criminology as a discipline, the foreground factors that make criminal behavior a morally alluring endeavor deemed…

Abstract

Published over 30 years ago, Seductions of Crime has transformed criminology as a discipline, the foreground factors that make criminal behavior a morally alluring endeavor deemed an important point to consider in accounts of criminal action by those even in mainstream criminology. In this chapter, we provide an update and revision to Katz's theory of righteous slaughter in an institutional context. We argue that killing is an overcoming, a negotiated and contingent outcome that is accomplished through the emotional and behavioral management of the self, the killing a reflexive reaction, driven by fear and excitement of the situation, peppered with a heavy heaping of moral agonizing. We argue that the killings and refrained killings carried out by soldiers and police are negative character, lacking the sensuous and affirmative character of an ontological project that Katz described.

Details

Jack Katz
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-072-7

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Christine K. Lubaszka and Phillip C. Shon

Beginning with the understanding that healthcare serial killers differ from traditional serial killers in terms of victim selection, risk and offender behavior, this paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

Beginning with the understanding that healthcare serial killers differ from traditional serial killers in terms of victim selection, risk and offender behavior, this paper attempts to reconceptualize how the motivations of healthcare serial killers are understood within the scope of care‐giving environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the current literature surrounding serial homicide and serial killers, the paper argues that healthcare serial killers, by virtue of their profession, have an advantage in committing homicides that are less likely to be detected.

Findings

It is found that healthcare professionals work in an environment that is conducive to anti‐social behaviour like homicide. More specifically, recurring conditions within the work place (e.g. lack of a reporting system for problem employees, code of silence amongst employees) adds to the ease with which healthcare serial killers can evade capture.

Originality/value

Research examining healthcare professionals who kill their patients is limited. The current paper provisionally adds to the current understanding of serial homicide. While offering various explanations as to why healthcare serial killers are difficult to detect, this paper also explores some potential solutions for the monitoring of healthcare professionals and protecting the vulnerable patients in their care.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Jack Katz
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-072-7

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Phillip Chong Ho Shon and Shannon M. Barton‐Bellessa

Previous criminological research has examined the causes and correlates of violent juvenile offending, but failed to explore the developmental taxonomies of crime throughout…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous criminological research has examined the causes and correlates of violent juvenile offending, but failed to explore the developmental taxonomies of crime throughout history. Theoretically, developmental trajectories of offending (i.e. life‐course persistent and adolescence‐limited offenders) should be identifiable irrespective of time and place. This study aims to examine the pre‐offense characteristics of nineteenth‐century American parricide offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

Using archival records of two major newspapers (New York Times, Chicago Tribune), the study examines 220 offenders who committed attempted and completed parricides during the latter half of the nineteenth century (1852‐1999).

Findings

Results reveal that a small group of adult parricide offenders displayed antisocial tendencies at an early age that persisted into adulthood. These findings are consistent with the developmental literature, thus providing support for identification of pre‐offense characteristics of parricide offenders across historical periods.

Originality/value

The findings reported in this paper are of value to psychologists, historians, and criminologists, for they illuminate the similarities in predictors related to violent behaviors in a small subsection of adult offenders across two centuries.

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Roberta L. Coles

Unfortunately, I am not the first to attempt to map out the narrative terrain of Others. In 1985, R. S. Perinbanayagam presented various social theorists’ conceptions of the Other…

Abstract

Unfortunately, I am not the first to attempt to map out the narrative terrain of Others. In 1985, R. S. Perinbanayagam presented various social theorists’ conceptions of the Other in his book Signifying Acts: Structure and Meaning in Everyday Life. Basically, they comprise three Others: the Generalized Other, the Meiotic Other (my language), and the Significant Other. I will address three additional Others – the Unconscious Other, the Marginalized Other, and the Nonhuman Other – that I find in a broader and more recent literature. Although I group them into six main Others, the borders of these types are somewhat arbitrary, porous, and nondiscrete, as interaction and intersection exist among them. Two characteristics that distinguish one Other from another are whether the Other exists within or outside the Self and whether the Other is an individual or aggregate entity. The Unconscious Other and the Generalized Other both are constructed from symbolic material outside the individual but ultimately take up residence within the Self. The Meiotic Self is the self-divided; there may be multiple divisions but each Meiotic Self is usually presented as singly constituted. The Significant Other, an individual, and the Marginalized Other, often a status group or member of it, reside outside the Self but play supporting roles in relation to any particular Self, which may also be an individual or status group, such as men, Whites, and Americans. The Nonhuman Other may be individual, an aggregate of individuals, or the product of human behavior, all of which reside outside the Self.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-931-9

Abstract

Details

Public Morality and the Culture Wars: The Triple Divide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-722-8

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Pamela S. Tolbert and Shon R. Hiatt

Foundational work on institutional theory as a framework for studying organizations underscored its relevance to analyses of entrepreneurship, but entrepreneurship research has…

Abstract

Foundational work on institutional theory as a framework for studying organizations underscored its relevance to analyses of entrepreneurship, but entrepreneurship research has often ignored the insights provided by this theoretic approach. In this chapter, we illustrate the utility of institutional theory as a central framework for explaining entrepreneurial phenomena by discussing three primary questions for entrepreneurship researchers: Under what conditions are individuals likely to found new organizations? What are key influences on the kinds of organizations they found? And what factors determine the likelihood of the survival of new organizations? We describe the kinds of answers that an institutional perspective provides to these questions, illustrate some of our arguments by drawing on a recent field of entrepreneurial endeavor, hedge funds, and discuss the implications of our analysis for further work by entrepreneurship researchers.

Details

Institutions and Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-240-2

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Sabine Bacouel-Jentjens and Inju Yang

The purpose of this paper is to paper investigates whether different perceptions exist with regard to diversity management within an organisation. Additionally, if such…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to paper investigates whether different perceptions exist with regard to diversity management within an organisation. Additionally, if such differences exist, what contextual factors influence these perceptions?

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this study is based on inductive and interpretative case research, which aims to compare diverse perceptions in two different organisational units of a company. For this purpose, 30 semi-structured interviews were conducted.

Findings

The findings in this paper highlight the importance of contexts in the study of diversity management. That is, contexts such as workforce composition and power (e.g. organisational status) in an organisation as well as the social environment’s impact on social identity processes, which results in discrepant focusses on and recognition of diversity management within the same organisation.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to research on a more nuanced approach to diversity by proposing an importance of contexts for the process of social identity and further perceptual discrepancy.

Practical implications

Qualitative research on and findings about perceptual discrepancy help to close the gap between the practice and rhetoric of diversity management.

Originality/value

Departing from extant empirical research on diversity at the workplace, which relies predominantly on quantitative methods, a qualitative design of this study allows a refinement of previous findings. Also, this paper provides deeper insight into the sense-making process, resulting in different diversity perceptions by different employees according to their work and social environments or contexts.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Noa Aharony

Although the mobile phone is a popular gadget, only a few studies have examined the relationships between personality characteristics and mobile phone use. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the mobile phone is a popular gadget, only a few studies have examined the relationships between personality characteristics and mobile phone use. This study aims to integrate and extend the literature by focusing on various personality characteristics and motivations to fully understand the influence of these variables on mobile phone use.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted in Israel during the first semester of the 2015 academic year and encompassed 181 library and information science students. Participants were asked to complete the following questionnaires: personal details, mobile usage, motivation, self-disclosure and personality characteristics (openness to experience and extroversion and loneliness).

Findings

The most common use of students’ mobile phones is for mobile voice communication. Further, results show that the major factors that influence individual mobile phone use are motivation and the time spent using the phone. In addition, results indicate that personality characteristics have a large impact on mobile phone use as well, and that the dominant ones are openness to experience and self-disclosure.

Originality/value

The current study expands the scope of research about mobile phone use by examining the different functions provided by mobile phones within the context of personality characteristics as well as motivation. Further, mobile phones now not only serve as a means of communication but also have become a central means in students’ lives to access their social network system of choice, search for information and enjoy online leisure activities.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2023

Abdul Wahid Khan and Abhishek Mishra

This study aims to conceptualize the relationship of perceived artificial intelligence (AI) credibility with consumer-AI experiences. With the widespread deployment of AI in…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to conceptualize the relationship of perceived artificial intelligence (AI) credibility with consumer-AI experiences. With the widespread deployment of AI in marketing and services, consumer-AI experiences are common and an emerging research area in marketing. Various factors affecting consumer-AI experiences have been studied, but one crucial factor – perceived AI credibility is relatively underexplored which the authors aim to envision and conceptualize.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a conceptual development approach to propose relationships among constructs, supported by 34 semi-structured consumer interviews.

Findings

This study defines AI credibility using source credibility theory (SCT). The conceptual framework of this study shows how perceived AI credibility positively affects four consumer-AI experiences: (1) data capture, (2) classification, (3) delegation, and (4) social interaction. Perceived justice is proposed to mediate this effect. Improved consumer-AI experiences can elicit favorable consumer outcomes toward AI-enabled offerings, such as the intention to share data, follow recommendations, delegate tasks, and interact more. Individual and contextual moderators limit the positive effect of perceived AI credibility on consumer-AI experiences.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the emerging research on AI credibility and consumer-AI experiences that may improve consumer-AI experiences. This study offers a comprehensive model with consequences, mechanism, and moderators to guide future research.

Practical implications

The authors guide marketers with ways to improve the four consumer-AI experiences by enhancing consumers' perceived AI credibility.

Originality/value

This study uses SCT to define AI credibility and takes a justice theory perspective to develop the conceptual framework.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

1 – 10 of 19