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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Timothy Steffensmeier, Julia Fabris McBride and Peter Dove

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of the DeBoer fellowship, a citizen leadership development program in Myanmar. The challenge in Myanmar of catalyzing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of the DeBoer fellowship, a citizen leadership development program in Myanmar. The challenge in Myanmar of catalyzing transformative change facing government and civil society cannot be overstated. Autocratic, centralized, and a traits-based approach to leadership has been, until recently, the primary way to assess leaders in Myanmar. In this dynamic civic context, new ways of leading and learning are needed.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews of DeBoer fellowship alumni were analyzed using a single case study method. The project focuses on individual participants of the program as the primary unit of analysis. In addition, direct observation and contributions from DeBoer fellowship administration and faculty were used to describe this case study.

Findings

The DeBoer fellows understood their challenge as one of energize others, a concept of adaptive leadership. Moreover, individuals experienced deep degrees of transformational development. Civic agency was the least noticable concept that was studied.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could more explicitly measure and examine the degree to which civic agency is being nurtured in leadership development programs.

Practical implications

Civic leadership curriculum designers should be more conscious of adult development theory when choosing programming objectives and activities.

Social implications

Leadership development initatives in more authoritative systems can be effective developmental experiences for participants who are motivated to improve their organizations and communities.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first effort to analyze a citizen leadership program in Myanmar.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Peter Dove and Sally Brown

Explores some key issues in appraisal for staff in institutions ofhigher education. Considers the need to address specifically the issuesof equal opportunities in appraisal, and…

1126

Abstract

Explores some key issues in appraisal for staff in institutions of higher education. Considers the need to address specifically the issues of equal opportunities in appraisal, and makes a case for team appraisal. Examines the problems of unwilling appraisers chosen by post rather than person and proposes that there should be an Ombudsperson for dissatisfied appraisees. Discusses the ethics of appraisal, together with the varying appraisal agendas of different constituencies of staff. Consideration is given to the real purposes of appraisal and the policy of delegation to the lowest level. Deplores the proposals to link appraisal to performance‐related pay and argues for the retention of appraisal′s developmental focus.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1973

ERIC CAVE, ALAN DAY, WH SNAPE, JACK DOVE, KR TOMLINSON, PETER POCKLINGTON and PETER PLIMSOLL

THE RECENT DECLINE in issues has been noticed fairly generally over the country; many librarians have been considerably concerned about it, and your April comments in ‘Off the…

18

Abstract

THE RECENT DECLINE in issues has been noticed fairly generally over the country; many librarians have been considerably concerned about it, and your April comments in ‘Off the cuff’ are relevant. I have not felt concerned to a great degree, though previously I had enjoyed seeing constantly increased use of the city libraries service in my 20 years in Cambridge. The final figures for 1972/73 together with comparisons for the previous year are as follows:

Details

New Library World, vol. 74 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

William W. Crosbie

To review Peter Plantec's book Virtual Humans: A Build it Yourself Kit.

1038

Abstract

Purpose

To review Peter Plantec's book Virtual Humans: A Build it Yourself Kit.

Design/methodology/approach

This book is meant to be read by one willing to actively engage with the technologies that Plantec introduces. While the technology that enables virtual agents is stable, many agents are annoyingly non‐humanlike in their interactions. Plantec encourages his readers to enter the world of virtual humans by providing the resources and coaching necessary to create a digital agent. He challenges the reader to throw off the notion that she is creating a technical implementation, a piece of software, and instead persuades her to approach the task as a scriptwriter would in creating a character.

Findings

Only through the application of artifice can developers hope to create deeply engaging virtual humans with recognizable, engaging personalities. But once people start to believe in their virtual companions, where might it lead them as a society?

Originality/value

Provides information about virtual humans.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Tom Redman, Ed Snape and Gerard McElwee

Performance appraisal is a longstanding, widespread andwell‐developed practice in industry. Suggests that it possessesconsiderable potential to facilitate effective human…

1511

Abstract

Performance appraisal is a longstanding, widespread and well‐developed practice in industry. Suggests that it possesses considerable potential to facilitate effective human resource management. Also argues, however, that it is often not given the attention it deserves and is flawed in practice. Traces the origins and development of performance appraisal, reviews why and how organizations use it, and concludes by examining who conducts staff appraisal.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Xian Liu, Helena Maria Lischka and Peter Kenning

This research aims to systematically explore the cognitive and emotional effects of values-related and performance-related negative brand publicity and investigate how the…

2210

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to systematically explore the cognitive and emotional effects of values-related and performance-related negative brand publicity and investigate how the psychological effects translate into different behavioural outcomes. In addition, it examines the relative effectiveness of two major brand response strategies in mitigating negative publicity.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experimental studies were conducted to test the hypotheses. Study 1 examines the effects of values- and performance-related negative brand publicity, using a 3 (negative brand publicity: values-related vs performance-related vs control) × 2 (brand: Dove vs Axe) between-subjects experiment. Study 2 further compares the effects of two major brand response strategies on consumers’ post-crisis perceived trustworthiness and trust and responses towards a brand involved in negative publicity. A 2 (negative brand publicity: values-related vs performance-related) × 2 (brand response strategy: reduction-of-offensiveness vs corrective action) between-subjects design was used.

Findings

The results suggest that values-related negative brand publicity is perceived as being more diagnostic and elicits a stronger emotion of contempt, but a weaker emotion of pity than performance-related negative brand publicity. Moreover, values-related negative brand publicity has a stronger negative impact on consumer responses than performance-related negative brand publicity. Interestingly, compared to perceived diagnosticity of information and the emotion of pity, the emotion of contempt is more likely to cause differences in consumer responses to these two types of negative brand publicity. Regarding brand response strategy, corrective action is more effective than reduction-of-offensiveness for both types of negative brand publicity, but the advantage of corrective action is greater for the performance-related case.

Originality/value

This research enriches the negative publicity and brand perception literature, showing the asymmetric cognitive, emotional and behavioural effects of values- and performance-related negative brand publicity. It also identifies the psychological mechanisms underlying consumer responses to negative brand publicity, and it provides empirical evidence for the relative effectiveness of two major brand response strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

David Austen-Smith, Adam Galinsky, Katherine H. Chung and Christy LaVanway

Dove and Axe were two highly successful brands owned by Unilever, a portfolio company. Dove was a female-oriented beauty product brand that exhorted “real beauty” and not the…

Abstract

Dove and Axe were two highly successful brands owned by Unilever, a portfolio company. Dove was a female-oriented beauty product brand that exhorted “real beauty” and not the unachievable standards that the media portrayed. In contrast, Axe was a brand that purportedly “gives men the edge in the mating game.”□ Their risqué commercials always portrayed the supermodel-type beauty ideal that Dove was trying to change. Unilever had always been a company of brands where the consumer knew the brands but not the company, but recently there had been the idea to unify the company with an umbrella mission for all of its brands. This would turn Unilever into a company with brands, potentially increasing consumer awareness and encourage cross-purchases between the different brands. However, this raised questions about the conflicting messages between the brands' marketing campaigns, most notably between Unilever's two powerhouse brands, Dove and Axe. The case begins with COO Alan Jope anticipating an upcoming press meeting in New York City to discuss Unilever's current (i.e., 2005) performance and announce Unilever's decision to create an umbrella mission statement for the company. This case focuses on the central question of whether or not consistency between brand messages is necessary or inherently problematic.

The Unilever's Mission for Vitality case was created to help students and managers develop an appreciation for how the values underlying a marketing campaign can affect and alter an organization's culture. The case focuses on how two products and marketing campaigns that express conflicting underlying values (as reflected in the Dove Real Beauty and the Axe Effect campaigns) within the same corporation can give rise to a number of unintended organizational and marketing complications.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2014

Tatyana Kleyn and Jan Valle

In an effort to better prepare pre-service candidates to work with all students and to respond to the current collaborative team teaching trend within New York City public…

Abstract

In an effort to better prepare pre-service candidates to work with all students and to respond to the current collaborative team teaching trend within New York City public schools, the authors who are professors of bilingual education and inclusive education/disability studies, respectively, combined their student teaching seminars in bilingual education and childhood education, in order to: (1) provide a model of co-teaching as well as an experience and perspective of being a student in a classroom with two teachers; (2) provide pre-service candidates with ongoing access to the expertise of two professors during their student teaching experience; (3) engage pre-service teachers in critical conversations about identifying and resisting deficit constructions of both emergent bilingual students and students with disabilities; (4) engage in a self-study of teaching practice within this collaborative context; (5) consider how well our respective programs currently prepare pre-service teachers. The Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices approach gleaned data from the co-instructors’ weekly reflective journals and student evaluations to reveal multiple benefits of a collaborative classroom context for pre-service teachers as well as the professors. These benefits included a rethinking of academic structures, spaces for interconnectedness across fields, and increased professor and student learning. The findings challenge teacher educators to consider whether or not a traditional approach to teacher preparation truly offers pre-service teachers the tools to serve diverse students. The authors call on schools of education to transgress traditional academic boundaries to adequately prepare pre-service teachers for the 21st century classroom.

Details

Research on Preparing Preservice Teachers to Work Effectively with Emergent Bilinguals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-265-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 February 2023

Cheryl Green

Abstract

Details

Social Justice Case Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-747-1

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1982

The first Alfa‐Laval ultrafiltration plant to be installed for an electro‐phoretic paint application in the UK is now in use at a new plant opened by the Thetford based finishing…

Abstract

The first Alfa‐Laval ultrafiltration plant to be installed for an electro‐phoretic paint application in the UK is now in use at a new plant opened by the Thetford based finishing specialists, Dove Anodising.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 11 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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