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1 – 10 of 668
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Peter Blackburn and Barry Fryer

Describes the main features of a unique management development programme devised by Shepherd Construction Ltd and Leeds Metropolitan University, which features work‐based…

527

Abstract

Describes the main features of a unique management development programme devised by Shepherd Construction Ltd and Leeds Metropolitan University, which features work‐based learning, mentoring and accreditation of prior learning and has resulted in the first group of Shepherd managers recently receiving their postgraduate awards. Demonstrates that industry and higher education can get together and do new and exciting things.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Brian Thomas‐Peter and Jason Jones

The PCL‐R has been heralded as the ‘unparalleled’ (Salekin et al, 1996) risk assessment tool for assessing risk of violent and non‐violent recidivism. In the UK, the PCL‐R looks…

Abstract

The PCL‐R has been heralded as the ‘unparalleled’ (Salekin et al, 1996) risk assessment tool for assessing risk of violent and non‐violent recidivism. In the UK, the PCL‐R looks likely to become an industry standard assessment in psychological evaluation of individuals thought to have a dangerous and severe personality disorder. However, current knowledge about the PCL‐R is unsatisfactory, and a number of issues need to be addressed before clinicians can be confident in the use of this measure. This paper highlights these issues from the perspective of the practising clinician. Questions are raised about the theoretical, methodological and treatment implications of the use of the PCL‐R. Future research needs are established in this context of caution over the use of the measure in routine clinical and academic assessment.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Derek Utley

A description of the implementation of a language trainingprogramme in the UK subsidiary, Rowntree Mackintosh, of a largemultinational company, Nestle, is given.

Abstract

A description of the implementation of a language training programme in the UK subsidiary, Rowntree Mackintosh, of a large multinational company, Nestle, is given.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 90 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Brian J. Hurn

The hallmark of the new breed of European manager is cross‐cultural and linguistic fluency to achieve competitive edge in the European marketplace. There is a need to acquire and…

698

Abstract

The hallmark of the new breed of European manager is cross‐cultural and linguistic fluency to achieve competitive edge in the European marketplace. There is a need to acquire and develop certain key competencies in order to live harmoniously and work effectively in this international environment. These requirements are reflected in the recruitment and selection of European managers. The changing face of European management presents new training challenges and opportunities, with the emphasis on developing cross‐cultural awareness, the ability to work in multicultural teams and to communicate across cultures.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Yunping Liang and Baabak Ashuri

In classical perspective, projects under a certain size are not feasible for P3. However, there is an emerging trend on using P3 to deliver projects which are frequently at small…

Abstract

Purpose

In classical perspective, projects under a certain size are not feasible for P3. However, there is an emerging trend on using P3 to deliver projects which are frequently at small- to medium- size to meet ever-increasingly complex social needs, including enhancing lifecycle performance of existing facilities, designing and building for resilience and sustainability, ensuring cost effectiveness of public spending and fostering innovation. In contrast with the increasing implementation, small and medium P3s, especially those in the United States, receive little attention in existing studies. This study aims at answering the question: in the context of US, what features of those small- to medium- sized P3s with success records enable the selection of P3 as delivery method.

Design/methodology/approach

By critically reviewing the literature, this study synthesizes and discusses the challenges in classical perspective. The authors use a framework drawn from the transaction cost to propose two types of enabling features that could contribute to the success of small and medium P3s. The proposed enabling features are supported by case study of twelve identified small- to medium- sized P3s which have reached financial closure as of 2018 in the United States.

Findings

The results show how the identified enabling opportunities have been used in these cases to enhance the viability of the P3 model in the infrastructure market. The two types of features are high tolerance enabler explained by the expectations on indirect and non-monetary compensations, and cost reduction enablers including: (1) being in the sectors with well-established traditions on using private investments; (2) having developers with expertise on infrastructure finance; (3) being in the jurisdictions with favorable legislative environment and (4) having less-uncertain future project revenue.

Originality/value

This study, for the first time, critically examines the enabling features of the P3 model for delivering small and medium infrastructure projects in the United States. This research sheds light on the credibility and viability of small- to medium- sized P3 and increases the confidence in policy makers to promote this model.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Robert Blackburn, Peter Carey and George Tanewski

The purpose of this paper is to test a conceptual framework explaining the role of relationships and trust in enabling the purchase of business advice by small business…

1850

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a conceptual framework explaining the role of relationships and trust in enabling the purchase of business advice by small business owner–managers from their external accountants.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a semi-structured interview approach with 20 small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owners and accountants in London and Melbourne.

Findings

The interview data support the conceptual framework’s central proposition that relationships and trust, rather than being antecedents of demand for advice, are necessary conditions for enabling latent demand. SMEs with greater propensity to trust are more open to buying business advice but not necessarily from their accountant.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the fieldwork is that it is based on a non-random and limited sample of accountants and SMEs.

Practical implications

Accountants in public practice can no longer assume that the already established relationships with their clients, developed while providing compliance services, will automatically lead SME clients to purchase business advice.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the accounting literature by developing a conceptual model of relationships and trust that will assist the profession in better understanding the complex dynamics of the accountant–client relationship. The conceptual model distinguishes, for the first time, the antecedent factors of demand for business advice from the enabling roles of relationships and trust. Fieldwork interviews also yielded new insights into how SMEs’ decisions to purchase business advice are influenced by specific personality traits of SME owner–managers and additional antecedent demand factors not identified in the extant literature – economic conditions, environmental turbulence and business life-cycle.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Carl A. Rodrigues

Total Quality Management (TQM), this framework proposes, can be achieved only when the organization develops the ability to cater to customers' needs, monitor the internal and…

Abstract

Total Quality Management (TQM), this framework proposes, can be achieved only when the organization develops the ability to cater to customers' needs, monitor the internal and external environments on an ongoing basis to obtain and disseminate information needed by empowered group decision makers, establish and maintain an atmosphere where there is strong vertical and horizontal communication, collaboration, and cooperation among individuals in internal units, as well as among individuals in external units, develop and maintain a bond and a “sense of ownership” among employees; and develop and maintain ongoing training programs.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Dave Crick

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in the UK…

2765

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in the UK tourism industry. The first business had to be closed down despite the partners employing turnaround strategies to recover from a lack of planning, since an effective work/life balance was not achieved; the second has proved to be more successful due to entrepreneurial learning in overcoming earlier errors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved multiple in‐depth interviews with the key business owner and his partners in the two respective businesses together with supplementary interviews with staff and viewing documentation for triangulation purposes.

Findings

The findings based on a longitudinal case history suggest that some enterprising individuals may learn from certain past mistakes but could still need others to support particular business practices for them to succeed. The results also suggest that, even if a badly performing business can be turned around, owner/managers must be aware of the potential social costs that can be incurred in implementing strategies. As such, it demonstrates the need to learn from experiences and plan for social as well as work‐related issues to maintain a work/life balance, particularly in a “lifestyle” business.

Practical implications

The implications of the findings suggest that advisors (including university teaching) involved with assisting entrepreneurs make them aware of the need for effective planning. In particular, that the widely reported hard work and long hours involved in running a business can take a toll on personal lives and the work/life balance of enterprising individuals must be managed.

Originality/value

The main aspect of originality of the paper comes from the study of social costs of running an entrepreneurial venture, but the longitudinal nature of the study provides a further aspect of originality in this field of research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Sin‐Hoon Hum and Hoon‐Hong Sim

Competition, technological advancement and the sophistication of consumers’ needs have led to the evolution of competitive paradigms, in which, time‐based competition apparently…

4531

Abstract

Competition, technological advancement and the sophistication of consumers’ needs have led to the evolution of competitive paradigms, in which, time‐based competition apparently has emerged as the competitive paradigm of the 1990s. While much has been written about the paradigm since it was first highlighted in the late 1980s, no comprehensive literature review is currently available. Seeks to provide such a review of the literature. Categorizes the existing literature into four broad classes: descriptive literature, managerial implications, case studies and applications, and mathematical modelling. Presents the key ideas and the associated literature to the reader as a guide to the total topic of time‐based competition. Reviews also the theoretic time‐based modelling literature, and so highlights the current status and limitations of this literature. Provides the motivation for further research to be carried out within the realm of time‐based modelling.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 668