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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Lilith Arevshatian Whiley and Gina Grandy

The authors explore how service workers negotiate emotional laboring with “dirty” emotions while trying to meet the demands of neoliberal healthcare. In doing so, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore how service workers negotiate emotional laboring with “dirty” emotions while trying to meet the demands of neoliberal healthcare. In doing so, the authors theorize emotional labor in the context of healthcare as a type of embodied and emotional “dirty” work.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to their data collected from National Health Service (NHS) workers in the United Kingdom (UK).

Findings

The authors’ data show that healthcare service workers absorb, contain and quarantine emotional “dirt”, thereby protecting their organization at a cost to their own well-being. Workers also perform embodied practices to try to absolve themselves of their “dirty” labor.

Originality/value

The authors extend research on emotional “dirty” work and theorize that emotional labor can also be conceptualized as “dirty” work. Further, the authors show that emotionally laboring with “dirty” emotions is an embodied phenomenon, which involves workers absorbing and containing patients' emotional “dirt” to protect the institution (at the expense of their well-being).

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Eddie Blass and Pauline Weight

Building on part 1 of this series, this paper aims to look at alternative ways in which business schools can develop the future managers and leaders needed by organisations. It

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Abstract

Purpose

Building on part 1 of this series, this paper aims to look at alternative ways in which business schools can develop the future managers and leaders needed by organisations. It draws attention to an emerging gap in the marketplace and suggests one possible model for addressing it.

Design/methodology/approach

A year‐long future study was undertaken at Cranfield School of Management combining a range of traditional research methods and samples including literature review, surveys of alumni, academics and futurists, interviews with recruiters and human resource (HR) managers, a Delphi study with international participants, and interviews and a focus group with business leaders. The results were then analysed and combined to form the pictures developed in this article and its counterpart.

Findings

Following on from Part 1, this paper proposes a new “élite” qualification for senior managers and leaders to replace the Master of Business Administration (MBA) in the marketplace. This would allow the MBA to become the graduate conversion course in business necessary as an entry point into management. The Master's in Business Leadership (MBL) focuses on the individual rather than curriculum, and is a personal development journey rather than a functional knowledge‐based experience, as there is an assumption that this knowledge base is already there prior to the course being undertaken. This paper concludes with a comparative analysis of the MBA, the MBL and the International Master's in Practising Management which Mintzberg has proferred as his alternative to the MBA.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comparison of MBA offerings and potential substitutes. It also suggests a new curriculum for senior management education to prepare people for leadership in the future, while repositioning the MBA as a mass graduate conversion programme. By putting forward one possible way forward in the management education market, this paper hopes to open discussion for further development of the international management education sector.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Eddie Blass and Pauline Weight

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) is becoming increasingly publicly criticised by the likes of Mintzberg and other management writers. Much of their criticism is based

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Abstract

Purpose

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) is becoming increasingly publicly criticised by the likes of Mintzberg and other management writers. Much of their criticism is based on personal experience and opinion rather than any systematic research, and ready‐made solutions are proposed as alternatives. This paper (and its counterpart) are the result of a year of research into the future of the MBA. Its purpose is to question whether its current market decline is terminal or if indeed it can be resurrected.

Design/methodology/approach

A year‐long future study was undertaken at Cranfield School of Management combining a range of traditional research methods and samples including literature review, surveys of alumni, academics and futurists, interviews with recruiters and human resources (HR) managers, a Delphi study with international participants, and interviews and a focus group with business leaders. The results were then analysed and combined to form the pictures developed in this article and its counterpart.

Findings

The MBA is positioned here as a qualification that is plagued by market confusion as to what it actually represents and what its value is. A pre‐emptive post‐mortem is carried out into the future of the MBA and the future senior manager/leader, which highlights the gap between research and practice, league tables, e‐learning and attempts at internationalisation as some of the causes of the current malaise. The paper also looks at how some business schools are starting to address these issues in order to maintain the MBA as a valued qualification in the management marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comparison of MBA offerings and potential substitutes. It opens the arena of senior management education for debate by charting the future decline of the MBA, challenging business schools to make changes or witness the death of their cash‐cow.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Pervasive Punishment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-466-4

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

Abstract

Details

Pervasive Punishment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-466-4

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

John Pring

In 1994, a leaked council report revealed that, for more than ten years, Gordon Rowe, a former social worker, had been beating, raping and ill‐treating the adults with learning…

Abstract

In 1994, a leaked council report revealed that, for more than ten years, Gordon Rowe, a former social worker, had been beating, raping and ill‐treating the adults with learning difficulties who lived in the residential homes run by his company, Longcare. This paper describes the effect of this abuse on some of those residents.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Frank Koenig, Pauline Anne Found and Maneesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a recent study conducted with the objective of addressing the problem of failure of baggage carts in the high-speed baggage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a recent study conducted with the objective of addressing the problem of failure of baggage carts in the high-speed baggage tunnel at Heathrow Terminal 5 by the development of an innovative condition-based maintenance (CBM) system designed to meet the requirements of 21st century airport systems and Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical experimental approach to this action research was taken to install a vibration condition monitoring pilot test in the north tunnel at Terminal 5. Vibration data were collected over a 6-month period and analysed to find the threshold of good quality tyres and those with worn bearings that needed replacement. The results were compared with existing measures to demonstrate that vibration monitoring could be used as a predictive model for CBM.

Findings

The findings demonstrated a clear trend of increasing vibration velocity with age and use of the baggage cart wheels caused by wheel mass unbalanced inertia that was transmitted to the tracks as vibration. As a result, preventative maintenance is essential to ensure the smooth running of airport baggage. This research demonstrates that a healthy wheel produces vibration of under 60 mm/s whereas a damaged wheel measures up to 100 mm/s peak to peak velocity and this can be used in real-time condition monitoring to prevent baggage cart failure. It can also run as an autonomous system linked to AI and Industry 4.0 airport logic.

Originality/value

Whilst vibration monitoring has been used to measure movement in static structures such as bridges and used in rotating machinery such as railway wheels (Tondon and Choudhury, 1999); this is unique as it is the first time it has been applied on a stationary structure (tracks) carrying high-speed rotating machinery (baggage cart wheels). This technique has been patented and proven in the pilot study and is in the process of being rolled out to all Heathrow terminal connection tunnels. It has implications for all other airports worldwide and, with new economic sensors, to other applications that rely on moving conveyor belts.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2023

Brigitte Burgess, Gallayanee Yaoyuneyong, Wesley A. Pollitte and Pauline Sullivan

This paper combines prospect theory (PT) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) proposing that technology anxiety (TA), risk averseness (RA), concern and resistance to use…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper combines prospect theory (PT) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) proposing that technology anxiety (TA), risk averseness (RA), concern and resistance to use inhibit technology acceptance, while trust, social influence (SI) and compatibility are enablers to technology acceptance, particularly in the context of consumer adoption of retail technologies during crises.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of PT and TAM literature was conducted to develop a model which considers the impact of inhibitors and enablers on retail technology acceptance.

Findings

This investigation establishes a theoretical model of mid-crisis retail technology adoption behavior that can be tested quantitatively. Several propositions regarding relationships between proposed inhibitors, enablers and TAM are presented, as well as implications for future research.

Originality/value

This investigation further integrates PT and TAM, proposing that PT is an appropriate framework to investigate inhibitors and enablers of retail technology acceptance during crises.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 51 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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