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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Frank Koenig, Pauline Anne Found and Maneesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a recent study conducted with the objective of addressing the problem of failure of baggage carts in the high-speed baggage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a recent study conducted with the objective of addressing the problem of failure of baggage carts in the high-speed baggage tunnel at Heathrow Terminal 5 by the development of an innovative condition-based maintenance (CBM) system designed to meet the requirements of 21st century airport systems and Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical experimental approach to this action research was taken to install a vibration condition monitoring pilot test in the north tunnel at Terminal 5. Vibration data were collected over a 6-month period and analysed to find the threshold of good quality tyres and those with worn bearings that needed replacement. The results were compared with existing measures to demonstrate that vibration monitoring could be used as a predictive model for CBM.

Findings

The findings demonstrated a clear trend of increasing vibration velocity with age and use of the baggage cart wheels caused by wheel mass unbalanced inertia that was transmitted to the tracks as vibration. As a result, preventative maintenance is essential to ensure the smooth running of airport baggage. This research demonstrates that a healthy wheel produces vibration of under 60 mm/s whereas a damaged wheel measures up to 100 mm/s peak to peak velocity and this can be used in real-time condition monitoring to prevent baggage cart failure. It can also run as an autonomous system linked to AI and Industry 4.0 airport logic.

Originality/value

Whilst vibration monitoring has been used to measure movement in static structures such as bridges and used in rotating machinery such as railway wheels (Tondon and Choudhury, 1999); this is unique as it is the first time it has been applied on a stationary structure (tracks) carrying high-speed rotating machinery (baggage cart wheels). This technique has been patented and proven in the pilot study and is in the process of being rolled out to all Heathrow terminal connection tunnels. It has implications for all other airports worldwide and, with new economic sensors, to other applications that rely on moving conveyor belts.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Birgitte Enslev Jensen, Pauline Anne Found, Sharon J. Williams and Paul Walley

Ward rounds in hospitals are crucial for decision-making in the context of patient treatment processes. However, these tasks are not systematically managed and are often extended…

Abstract

Purpose

Ward rounds in hospitals are crucial for decision-making in the context of patient treatment processes. However, these tasks are not systematically managed and are often extended due to missing information or equipment or staff unavailability. This research aims to assess whether ward rounds can be structured more efficiently and effectively from the perspective of patients and staff.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-method approach examines the ward rounds conducted in three units within a haematology department of a major Danish hospital. Baseline measures were collected to capture the value of the ward round described by patients and staff. The information on patient and equipment flows associated with a typical ward round was mapped with recommendations for improvement.

Findings

Staff aspired to deliver a good-quality ward round, but what this meant was never articulated and there were no established standards. The duration of the ward round was unpredictable and could take 6 hours to complete. Improvements identified by the team allow the ward rounds to be completed by mid-day with much more certainty.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides an insight as to how ward rounds are conducted within a Danish haematology department.

Practical implications

The research has implications for those involved in ward rounds to reduce the time taken whilst maintaining quality and safety of patient care.

Social implications

This research has implications for patients and their families who wish to spend time with consultants.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on the interactions between doctors and nurses. This research focuses on the operational process of the ward round and presents a structured approach to support multi-disciplinary teams with a focus on value from the patient’s perspective.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Alison Beard-Gunter, David Geraint Ellis and Pauline Anne Found

Voluntary participation, feedback loops, rules and goals are key elements of total quality management (TQM). The purpose of this paper is to determine if these four elements which…

Abstract

Purpose

Voluntary participation, feedback loops, rules and goals are key elements of total quality management (TQM). The purpose of this paper is to determine if these four elements which make TQM successful are the same elements that make computer games successful. If this is the case, what are the implications for developers of Human Computer Interfaces (HCI) in Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a systematic literature review of recent literature on engagement in games and user experiences and HCI design for industry followed by interpretation of the literature. The findings from the literature review are analysed and compared to TQM.

Findings

Good game design and TQM share four key components: goals, rules, a feedback system (including rewards) and voluntary participation. There is an opportunity for HCI developers to use a user experience lens inherent in games evolution and to expand on the design and motivational elements that have made games and TQM successful at motivating and engaging. Kuutti’s (1995) proposal of activity theory puts forward a promising framework for making systems engaging. There are positive implications merging good games design and TQM in socio-technic systems which could improve engagement and quality in companies implementing in Industy 4.0.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of achieving increased engagement in HCI systems similar to those seen in companies that have successfully implemented TQM could lead to greater productivity in companies operating in the highly technical environments of Industry 4.0.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is threefold: first, a description of the origins in industry of voluntary participation, feedback loops, rules and goals and their relationship to TQM; second, a systematic literature review of the same elements in computer games design; and third, the implications for developers of HCI systems in Industry 4.0.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Frank Koenig, Pauline Anne Found and Maneesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a recent study conducted with the objective of addressing the problem of failure of baggage carts in the high-speed baggage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a recent study conducted with the objective of addressing the problem of failure of baggage carts in the high-speed baggage tunnel at Heathrow Terminal 5 by the development of an innovative condition-based maintenance system designed to meet the requirements of twenty-first century airport systems and Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical experimental approach to this action research was taken to install a vibration condition monitoring pilot test in the north tunnel at Terminal 5. Vibration data were collected over a 6-month period and analysed to find the threshold of good quality tires and those with worn bearings that needed replacement. The results were compared with existing measures to demonstrate that vibration monitoring could be used as a predictive model for condition-based maintenance.

Findings

The findings demonstrated a clear trend of increasing vibration velocity with age and use of the baggage cart wheels caused by wheel mass unbalanced inertia that was transmitted to the tracks as vibration. As a result, preventative maintenance is essential to ensure the smooth running of airport baggage. This research demonstrates that a healthy wheel produces vibration of under 60 mm/s whereas a damaged wheel measures up to 100 mm/s peak-to-peak velocity and this can be used in real-time condition monitoring to prevent baggage cart failure. It can also run as an autonomous system linked to AI and Industry 4.0 airport logic.

Originality/value

Whilst vibration monitoring has been used to measure movement in static structures such as bridges and used in rotating machinery such as railway wheels (Tondon and Choudhury, 1999) this is unique as it is the first time it has been applied on a stationary structure (tracks) carrying high-speed rotating machinery (baggage cart wheels). This technique has been patented and proven in the pilot study and is in the process of being rolled out to all Heathrow terminal connection tunnels. It has implications for all other airports world-wide and, with new economic sensors, to other applications that rely on moving conveyor belts.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2024

Pauline Anne Found, Dnyaneshwar Mogale, Ziran Xu and Jianhao Yang

Corona Virus Disease (Covid-19) is a global pandemic that emerged at the end of 2019 and caused disruptions in global supply chains, particularly in the food supply chains that…

Abstract

Purpose

Corona Virus Disease (Covid-19) is a global pandemic that emerged at the end of 2019 and caused disruptions in global supply chains, particularly in the food supply chains that exposed the vulnerability of today’s food supply chain in a major disruption which provided a unique research opportunity. This review explores the current research direction for food supply chain resilience and identifies gaps for future research in preparing for future major global pandemics.

Design/methodology/approach

This article presents a review of food supply chain resilience followed a systematic literature review of the business and management-based studies related to the food supply chain in Covid-19 published between December 2019 and December 2021 to identify the immediate issues and responses that need to be addressed in the event of future disruptions in food supply chains due to new global health threats.

Findings

The study revealed the need for more literature on food supply chain resilience, particularly resilience to a major global pandemic. The study also uncovered the sequence of events in a major pandemic and identified some strategies for building resilience to potential future risks of such an event.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study are apparent. Firstly, the selection of databases is not comprehensive. Due to time limitations, authoritative publishers such as Springer, Emerald, Wiley and Taylor & Francis were not selected. Secondly, a single author completed the literature quality testing and text analysis, possibly reducing the credibility of the results due to subjective bias. Thirdly, the selected literature are the studies published during the immediate event of Covid-19, and before January 2022, other research studies may have been completed but were still in the state of auditing at this time.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study that provides a detailed classification of the immediate challenges to the food supply chain faced in both upstream and downstream nodes during a major global disruption. For researchers, this clearly shows the immediate difficulties faced at each node of the food supply chain, which provides research topics for future studies.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Frank Koenig, Pauline Anne Found, Maneesh Kumar and Nicholas Rich

The aim of this paper is to develop a contribution to knowledge that adds to the empirical evidence of predictive condition-based maintenance by demonstrating how the availability…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop a contribution to knowledge that adds to the empirical evidence of predictive condition-based maintenance by demonstrating how the availability and reliability of current assets can be improved without costly capital investment, resulting in overall system performance improvements

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical, experimental approach, technical action research (TAR), was designed to study a major Middle Eastern airport baggage handling operation. A predictive condition-based maintenance prototype station was installed to monitor the condition of a highly complex system of static and moving assets.

Findings

The research provides evidence that the performance frontier for airport baggage handling systems can be improved using automated dynamic monitoring of the vibration and digital image data on baggage trays as they pass a service station. The introduction of low-end innovation, which combines advanced technology and low-cost hardware, reduced asset failures in this complex, high-speed operating environment.

Originality/value

The originality derives from the application of existing hardware with the combination of edge and cloud computing software through architectural innovation, resulting in adaptations to an existing baggage handling system within the context of a time-critical logistics system.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Jason Canning and Pauline Anne Found

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contributing factors that lead to resistance to change, and to ascertain the relationship between organizational culture and…

4121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contributing factors that lead to resistance to change, and to ascertain the relationship between organizational culture and employee resistance in organizational change programmes, such as lean.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this research is in three main parts. Firstly, a systematic review of the literature pertaining to resistance to change is, secondly, followed by a case study involving an anonymous survey and semi-structured interviews to test the assumptions drawn from the literature. Finally, the literature research and case study results are drawn together to present a new model of resistance.

Findings

The finding of the literature, along with the finding of the case study confirm that lack of communication and participant involvement during change are highlighted as significant contributing factors to resistance and that these are related to organizational culture.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the secondary sources of information provide a significant weight of evidence to support the results from the case study, the results of the research are based on a single case study; therefore, caution should be applied before making generalizations from the data.

Practical implications

The findings can provide organizations, and change practitioners, with an insight into a number of the issues that should be considered in relation to an organizations culture before attempting large-scale change programmes.

Originality/value

The research findings provide a new model, the “resistance model” that identifies the interconnected issues that affect employees’ attitude to, and thus acceptance of, organizational change.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Harry Boer, Henrike E.E. Boer and Atanu Chaudhuri

111

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Pauline Lambell, Anne Cooper, Sam Hoyles, Sally‐Ann Pygall and Alicia O’Cathain

Three written scenarios, based on paediatric fever, with expected outcomes of self‐care (scenario 1), GP routine care (scenario 2) and urgent care (scenario 3), were presented to…

431

Abstract

Three written scenarios, based on paediatric fever, with expected outcomes of self‐care (scenario 1), GP routine care (scenario 2) and urgent care (scenario 3), were presented to 100 nurse advisors working in NHS Direct, the 24‐hour nurse‐led telephone helpline. Nurse advisors used one of three types of computerised decision support software to determine an outcome for each scenario, and in addition offered self‐care advice. There was variation between nurses in the outcomes for each scenario: 80 per cent of nurse advisors recommended self‐care only for scenario 1, 51 per cent recommended GP routine care for scenario 2, and 88 per cent recommended urgent care for scenario 3. Similar variations were found for the self‐care advice.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2021

Deirdre Anne Ryan and Pauline Boland

Diagnosis of substance use disorders and addictive behaviours are growing worldwide. It is timely to examine and collate literature on the nature of occupational therapy…

15123

Abstract

Purpose

Diagnosis of substance use disorders and addictive behaviours are growing worldwide. It is timely to examine and collate literature on the nature of occupational therapy intervention in this field, to increase understanding of current practice and inform future directions. The purpose of this paper is to source and synthesise literature on occupational therapy interventions used in the treatment of people experiencing addiction.

Design/methodology/approach

Four databases were searched in August 2019. A total of 597 titles were screened, and 18 studies with varying methods met inclusion criteria. A narrative synthesis of the included literature was arranged into themes to summarise key findings.

Findings

Findings were grouped into three themes about occupational therapy provision to people experiencing addiction: single occupation focused intervention; skills training (including sub-themes on daily living skills and vocational skills); and establishing a community-based sober routine.

Research limitations/implications

Further research on this topic should focus on efficacy of treatments and build on current findings to develop more rigorous research with appropriate sample sizes to support evidence-based practice.

Originality/value

This study presents a synthesis of how occupational therapy interventions have been used to treat people experiencing addiction issues. Findings indicate occupational therapy appears to fit well within addiction treatment and assert that occupational therapy is most supportive when interventions go beyond the teaching of skills alone to prioritise occupational engagement and client centred practice.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

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