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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Paul Gentle and Louise Clifton

The purpose of this paper is to draw on empirical data to interrogate the correlation between participation in leadership development programmes by individual leaders and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on empirical data to interrogate the correlation between participation in leadership development programmes by individual leaders and the ability of higher education institutions to learn organisationally from such participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a multi-stakeholder perspective, this paper focuses on the experiences of both senior and entry-level university managers and how these are connected systematically to institutional climates and structures conducive to learning.

Findings

There is a tendency for vice chancellors, directors of human resources and other senior managers to identify participants to sponsor programmes without putting in place mechanisms and cultural processes to incorporate their individual learning into organisational improvement.

Originality/value

The paper raises questions as to how societal needs are served by the organisational behaviours of universities with respect to developing leaders, and what higher institutions might do differently to increase the impact of developing leaders on their organisations. Suggested approaches include facilitating constructive dialogue in an experimental, reflective environment and integrating action learning and mentoring into institutional practices.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Louise Clifton and Paul Gentle

The purpose of this paper is to examine the working practices and outcomes of an action research project in a specialist organisation engaged in the field of leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the working practices and outcomes of an action research project in a specialist organisation engaged in the field of leadership development. The intention of the project was to enable the company involved to become a stronger learning organisation at a time when it was developing a future strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach to describe and analyse a three-stage process involving the use of a focus group, organisational climate survey and voluntary action learning sets. Interviews with participants are analysed thematically in order to assess the impact of the action research project on the organisation’s culture.

Findings

Participation by the majority of the Leadership Foundation’s staff in action learning and related opportunities for feedback within the organisation helped move its culture towards wider participation in strategy development and a whole organisation approach to working. Other organisations wishing to build collaborative working cultures can learn from the implications of the project, particularly those concerning the need to attend to the intended outcomes of action learning and the role of skilled, critical facilitators in action learning processes.

Originality/value

The paper is innovative in that it explores practitioner-led action research work in a setting of leadership and organisational development. It will interest leaders and managers who seek to build learning organisations, as well as organisational developers with an interest in enhancing the impact of action learning.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2020

Emma Gentle, Paul Linsley and John Hurley

Remote and regional Australia have comparatively fewer mental health services than their urban counterparts, what is more, mental health remains profoundly stigmatised. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Remote and regional Australia have comparatively fewer mental health services than their urban counterparts, what is more, mental health remains profoundly stigmatised. This study aims to understand how, if at all, the process of group art-making then publicly displaying the artworks can contribute to stigma reduction for young people (YP) experiencing mental health challenges in regional Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with six young artists who use regional mental health services and 25 people who viewed their displayed art using a thematic analysis of the coded interview data.

Findings

Findings of this study demonstrated how art-making as a process increased self-esteem, social interaction and artistic expression; while the viewers experienced an emotional connection to the art. The viewer’s response enhanced YP’s confidence in their abilities.

Originality/value

Incorporating art-making and exhibiting the art in public spaces could be incorporated into YP’s mental health services to support well-being and inform the perception the general public hold of mental health, thus reducing stigma.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Margaret M. Kress

The situating of pimatisiwin as a framework for spatial justice and self-determination aids educators in strengthening their understandings of Indigenous knowledges to support an…

Abstract

The situating of pimatisiwin as a framework for spatial justice and self-determination aids educators in strengthening their understandings of Indigenous knowledges to support an authentic inclusion of Indigenous students with disabilities. Through the sharing of Canada’s colonial history, and by critically examining the principles of care within special education, the author exposes its relationship with ableism, normalcy, eugenics, and white privilege to show how Indigenous peoples continue to be marginalized in the twenty-first century. This justice work asks educators to shift their perspectives of inclusion and wellness through the insertion of an Indigenous lens, one to help them see and hear the faces and voices of disabled Aboriginal children and their kinships. The chapter discusses the social model of disability, the psychology of Gentle Teaching, Indigenous ethics, and principles of natural laws through the voices of Nehiyawak and other knowledge keepers, in order to suggest an agenda for educators to come to an understanding of an emancipatory and gentle education. Spatial justice and Indigenous epistemologies merge as synergistic, inclusive, and holistic entities, to support Aboriginal children and youth as both they and those who teach learn to celebrate disabled ontologies. The chapter concludes by presenting how Gentle Teaching and Indigenous ways of knowing should be honored in this quest of creating an equitable, caring, and inclusive society for all disabled Indigenous children and youth.

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2023

Vern Neufeld Redekop

The nonmaterial dimension of reality is contrasted with the material, observable and empirically verifiable dimension that rose to dominance with the Enlightenment. The…

Abstract

The nonmaterial dimension of reality is contrasted with the material, observable and empirically verifiable dimension that rose to dominance with the Enlightenment. The nonmaterial dimension includes orientation, memes, tacit knowledge and spirituality. The orientation of an individual, group, or institution can be towards violence – getting ahead at the expense of the other – or blessing – working in such a way that there is mutual benefit. Orientations can be expressed through memes, cultural or behavioural patterns that are mimetically transmitted broadly within a society and diachronically through generations. If they catch on within a group, they can determine the institutional or group culture. Spirituality can be a source of change of orientation from violence to blessing and of growth in creativity, resilience and empowerment. David Peat and David Bohm posit an implicate order in the universe, thought as a system (in the context of dialogue), and gentle action. Neil Douglas-Klotz points out that the Aramaic words malkuta d'bwashmaya (kingdom of heaven) used by Jesus constituted a nonmaterial reality containing vision, norms and empowerment that exists within and among us – like the implicate order – and is accessed by those who truly wish to ‘see’ it. The emerging spirituality coming out of this engagement has a capacity to replace memes like those of empire, self-interest and grandiose leaders with memes that channel passions and energy towards bio-interest, transnational interest, transpersonal interest, empathy and widespread empowerment. And this could make all the difference in effecting truly sustainable development.

Details

Applied Spirituality and Sustainable Development Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-381-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Melissa Blackie

The front page of the Toronto Sun displayed an image of Karla Homolka bruised and battered and read, ‘Bernardo Did This to Karla: Crown’. In 1993, Karla Homolka entered into a…

Abstract

The front page of the Toronto Sun displayed an image of Karla Homolka bruised and battered and read, ‘Bernardo Did This to Karla: Crown’. In 1993, Karla Homolka entered into a plea deal in exchange for the testimony against her then-husband Paul Bernardo. Though Homolka pled guilty to two counts of manslaughter, Canadian media outlets painted Homolka as a subservient and battered woman fearful of the abusive Bernardo's reprisal. Then, during Bernardo's trial, rumoured videotapes finally surfaced that exposed Homolka's seemingly wilful role in the gruesome murders of the young girls Kristen French, Leslie Mahaffy, and her sister Tammy Homolka. Although Tammy Homolka's death had been deemed accidental, her body was exhumed, and autopsy reports found lethal traces of sedative drugs in her system. While sedated, both Bernardo and Homolka raped her as she choked and died on her own vomit. After these videotapes surfaced, media representations shifted drastically – referring to Homolka's plea deal as ‘the deal with the devil’.

This chapter outlines the crimes committed by Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka – also known as the Barbie and Ken Killers. Furthermore, it employs a qualitative literature review to document the evolution in the media representations of Homolka and exposes the media's role in the creation of this ‘monstrous’ woman in Canadian history. As this chapter outlines the representational shift of Homolka in the media, it deconstructs the hegemonic notions of proper femininity that often characterise women as deviant. Moreover, from a social constructivist lens, the brutality of Homolka's crimes are considered and examined in the context of the normative ideologies surrounding ideal womanhood and sexuality. I will argue that by dismantling these socially constructed ideologies, the significance of Homolka's whiteness also becomes apparent. As Homolka seems to deviate from her whiteness, media depictions illustrate an incitement of hysteria. Thus, this article questions the validity of the media representations that once depicted Homolka as ‘the girl next door’ – who was acting in accordance with her whiteness – but also inevitably paint her as the ‘devil’.

Details

Interdisciplinary Essays on Monsters and the Monstrous
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-027-7

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Lynn Revell and Hazel Bryan

Abstract

Details

Fundamental British Values in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-507-8

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2022

Hannah Mead Kling, Julia R. Norgaard and Nikolai G. Wenzel

This paper aims to study Catholic Social Theory (CST) and its implications for economic development. From the early days of CST through the papacy of Benedict XVI, the Church has…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study Catholic Social Theory (CST) and its implications for economic development. From the early days of CST through the papacy of Benedict XVI, the Church has been consistent about the promise and limits of markets. Markets offer the necessary foundation for human flourishing – but they must be ordered toward the common good and they carry the potential for spiritual loss. Pope Francis has changed course from over a century of CST, with a markedly different view of business, labor and free markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper summarizes 130 years of CST regarding the economy and describes the turn Pope Francis takes from this tradition. This paper discusses economic theory and analyzes the importance of markets for economic development and assesses Pope Francis’ economics in light of this theory.

Findings

This paper discusses the findings that – despite what we assume to be good intentions – the economics of Pope Francis would condemn billions to poverty. Others (Whaples, 2017a) have discussed the economics of Pope Francis.

Originality/value

Others (Whaples, 2017a) have discussed the economics of Pope Francis. This paper finds, however, that most of the critiques are too gentle, and do not recognize the full deleterious impact of the application of the new teachings.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

According to the report submitted by Mr Fernando Sanchez on the above event held from 21–23 September in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, bright sun and gentle green waves striking the…

Abstract

According to the report submitted by Mr Fernando Sanchez on the above event held from 21–23 September in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, bright sun and gentle green waves striking the beach and rocks could be seen a mere 100 feet away from the window of the Perstorp booth (one of the major sponsors) in the exhibition lobby.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1963

HARRY C. BAUER

When Mr. Dombey entrusted his little son, Paul, to Doctor Blimber for tutelage, the benevolent pedagogue tactfully inquired, “Shall we make a man of him?” Mr. Dombey brightened…

Abstract

When Mr. Dombey entrusted his little son, Paul, to Doctor Blimber for tutelage, the benevolent pedagogue tactfully inquired, “Shall we make a man of him?” Mr. Dombey brightened over the prospect, but his six‐year‐old offspring manifested utmost disdain. When the question was repeated for his benefit, the little man replied, “I had rather be a child”. Alas, the childish wish came true; before the year was out, little Paul Dombey languished and ultimately died of inanition.

Details

Library Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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