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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2019

Yancy Vaillant and Esteban Lafuente

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of past entrepreneurial experience on the reported innovativeness of serial entrepreneurs’ subsequent ventures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of past entrepreneurial experience on the reported innovativeness of serial entrepreneurs’ subsequent ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on insights from the generative entrepreneurial learning process and from cognition theories, the authors propose that regardless of the type of entrepreneurial experience, positive or negative, such experience enriches the cognitive schemas of serial entrepreneurs leading them to greater reported innovativeness. The proposed hypotheses are tested on a unique sample drawn from a Catalan adult population survey.

Findings

Results reveal that practical experience is an essential prerequisite for entrepreneurial learning, and even negative entrepreneurial experience may induce generative entrepreneurial learning suitable for subsequent outperforming ventures for the psychologically strong who have managed to learn from their experience.

Practical implications

The importance of this study stretches beyond a purely academic discussion and has implications for policy making within the area of business and economic development. Appropriate policy depends on the likeliness for serial entrepreneurs to improve. Thus, if serial entrepreneurs learn from their venturing experiences and/or acquire valuable knowledge from them, they may perform better, on average, in subsequent ventures. If subsequent ventures do build upon prior entrepreneurial experiences, calls for policy to encourage re-entries by entrepreneurs may be warranted, even if those entrepreneurs performed poorly in their previous ventures.

Originality/value

The authors analyze the impact of past performance of serial entrepreneurs on the reported innovativeness of their subsequence ventures. The contributions of this study stand as: the inclusion of the re-entry decision together with the innovativeness decision of entrepreneurs within the same model; separation of the positive or negative nature of serial entrepreneurs’ past experiences; focus on the entrepreneur rather than the firm as a unit of analysis; the use of a unique primary data set specifically collected for the purpose of this study about the past entrepreneurial experience of the Catalan adult population.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Daniel Parker and Gina Grandy

This paper aims to explore how varsity football athletes and coaches negotiate meanings when faced with the unmet expectations of a new head coach brought into lead a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how varsity football athletes and coaches negotiate meanings when faced with the unmet expectations of a new head coach brought into lead a turnaround process. It also aims to pay particular attention to the role of history in this meaning making process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on semi‐structured interviews with players and coaches at two points in time. To preserve the richness of their experiences and illuminate the historical aspects of change, it focuses on the stories of three players and one supporting coach.

Findings

Numerous symbols of change emerge that have multiple and contradictory meanings. The meanings around success and failure are renegotiated over time as individuals struggle with the unmet expectations of change. Moreover, individuals are unable to shed the failures of the past and move forward.

Practical implications

Change is a complex and messy process of managing multiple meanings. Understanding change entails more than a snapshot picture of an organization. New leaders have no control over the past, yet they need to be aware of how individuals experienced the past in order to increase the likelihood of success in the present.

Originality/value

Success and failure are experienced as an ongoing process as athletes and coaches experience, reflect on and interact with others. In illuminating the role of history in how change is experienced in the present, the paper demonstrates that the past can serve as both an immobilizing force, as well as a comparative point enabling individuals to rationalize their emotions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Chien-Ta Ho and Chung-Lun Wei

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to examine experiences of an information technology/information systems (IS) outsourcing service supplier as a signal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to examine experiences of an information technology/information systems (IS) outsourcing service supplier as a signal of perceived service quality and to consider the moderating effects of information asymmetries and signal credibility.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on signaling theory, the paper integrates past experiences of an outsourcing service supplier, information asymmetries, signal credibility, perceived service quality, and purchase intention into a model. Questionnaires were collected in Taiwan, and partial least-squares technique was employed to test the model.

Findings

The results indicate that past experiences of an IS outsourcing supplier affect perceived service quality, which subsequently influences positively the intention to purchase IS outsourcing services. In addition, signal credibility moderates the relationship between the provider’s past experiences and perceived service quality, though information asymmetries do not have significant effect on the hypothesized moderating relationship.

Originality/value

This research enriches the extant literatures in signaling theory by demonstrating the few-mentioned IS outsourced suppliers’ experiences as a quality signal as well as in outsourcing contexts with signaling perspectives. The empirical findings validate the importance of dissemination and investment of past experiences for IS provider companies and give a cue of utilizing providers’ experiences to alleviate uncertainty when assessing IS service quality and purchasing outsourcing services for client companies.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Athinodoros Chronis

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' attraction to the past and the experiential benefits associated with past‐related consumption practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' attraction to the past and the experiential benefits associated with past‐related consumption practices.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive study was undertaken using a heritage exhibition in Greece as an appropriate context. A total of 49 interviews using the central premises of phenomenological research were conducted in which 82 individuals participated. Informants were asked to elaborate on their consumption experience. Verbal data were analyzed and interpreted using theoretical guidance by Lowenthal's pioneering work on people's attraction to the past.

Findings

Six experiential benefits are found that are prevalent among consumers in their contact with the past: the experience of knowledge, cultural identity, cultural values, escape in time, aesthetic appreciation, and narrative connection. These benefits are embedded on existing cultural narratives that are further enriched through consumption practices. Moreover, the beneficial consumption outcomes of the past are mediated by imagination that functions as a “linking glue” and a “creative force” in the construction of narrative vignettes.

Research limitations/implications

Although this discovery‐oriented study provides insight into the consumption of the past, its exploratory nature does not guarantee generalizability beyond the convenience sample employed and the specific context. Further research should also investigate the extent to which the specific consumer benefits are prevalent in other consumption experiences.

Practical implications

This research provides orientation for the management of experiential products. Marketers can facilitate consumer experiences through the appropriate staging of the servicescape in both substantive and communicating ways. Specific direction can be taken by paying attention to each of the identified experiential benefits.

Originality/value

As experiential consumption rises in consumer research, it is of paramount importance to elucidate what drives consumers in participating and enjoying various consumption experiences. This study provides theoretical guidance to researchers in the area of experiential consumption by elaborating on the benefits associated with the consumption of the past. It also offers suggestions to practitioners for the appropriate management of an experiential servicescape.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Daniel Arturo Cernas Ortiz and Mark A. Davis

This paper aims to examine the influence of future and past negative time perspectives on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. The effect of national culture…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of future and past negative time perspectives on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. The effect of national culture (Mexico versus the USA) as a moderator of the above baseline relationships is also analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model is tested using survey data drawn from a sample of 287 Mexican and 274 US MBA students (N = 561). Regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Future time perspective has a positive relationship with job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Past negative time perspective has a negative association with both job attitudes. The effect of future time perspective on job satisfaction was significantly stronger in Mexico than in the USA. No other significant differences between the countries were found in terms of the time perspective and job attitudes association.

Practical implications

The results have implications for managing dispositions that affect work-related attitudes and behaviors with consequences for organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that time perspective affects job attitudes. Further, they also suggest that the interplay between future time perspective and culture influences job satisfaction.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Brittney Amber, Tuyen K. Dinh, Arielle N. Lewis, Leidy D. Trujillo and Margaret S. Stockdale

The purpose of this paper is to explore a possible effect of #MeToo media on individuals’ personal recall and reinterpretation of sex harassment (SH) experiences. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a possible effect of #MeToo media on individuals’ personal recall and reinterpretation of sex harassment (SH) experiences. The authors experimentally examine how exposure to high-profile stories of sexual misconduct triggers memories and reinterpretation of one’s own past SH experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 393 US adults, participants were randomly assigned to read one of four media passages, two of which were news stories or transcripts of high-profile cases of sexual harassment or misconduct (e.g., the Trump Access Hollywood transcript), then completed the Sexual Experiences Questionnaire (SEQ) and follow-up questions about how the media impacted their memory of their prior SH experiences.

Findings

Sexual misconduct media stories, compared to control conditions, indirectly predicted self-report of past SH (SEQ) through both remembering and reinterpreting one’s past experiences. Gender and political ideology moderated the indirect effects such that the effects of the media stories were stronger for women and for those higher on progressive political ideology.

Practical implications

This study experimentally demonstrated what has publicly been assumed to be a driving force behind the upswing of SH reports and the seriousness by which they have been regarded during the #MeToo era: publicized stories of high-profile sexual misconduct triggers personal recall of having been sexually harassed in the past and reinterpretation of SH experiences. The #MeToo movement may be acting as a driver of social change, facilitating changes in social norms. As these social norms change, organizations should be prepared to effectively respond to a possible increase in reporting SH experiences due changes in norms around reporting SH.

Originality/value

This study uses an experimental design to investigate the role of high-profile media stories about SH as a driving force behind the #MeToo movement.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Enzo Peruffo, Lucia Marchegiani and Francesca Vicentini

This paper aims to analyse the idea that experience acts as an antecedent in divestiture and triggers an organisational learning process that enables the divesting firm to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the idea that experience acts as an antecedent in divestiture and triggers an organisational learning process that enables the divesting firm to convert experience into knowledge, increasing the probability that a firm will undertake subsequent divestitures.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is quantitative. The research project used a case–control design, with a sample consisting of 274 divesting and non-divesting firms. Given the dichotomous nature of the dependent variable, the relations of the research model are tested using logistic regression.

Findings

The likelihood of a divestiture increases when firms have already had past experience of divestitures. Firm performance and firm size act as moderating variables, that is, the learning effects are weaker in firms with better past performance and also in larger firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the literature on organisational learning and divestiture. In particular, the knowledge obtained from previous divestitures is positively related to subsequent ones. The results on firm size and performance as contingency factors make it possible to distinguish between the different learning mechanisms in proactive and reactive divestitures, as well as in larger and smaller firms. Accordingly, a two-level framework of experience and knowledge is proposed.

Practical implications

The results are of interest for practitioners who need a better understanding of the antecedents of their strategic actions in terms of past experience and knowledge. The study also offers insights into the knowledge management practices that fit into the proposed two-level framework of knowledge accumulation.

Originality/value

The originality of the study consists in the strong evidence of learning effects in divestitures that it finds. This study augments a promising line of research on the effect of experience in rare strategic decisions, enriching our understanding of the learning mechanisms associated with complex experiences.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Leila Khoshghadam, Elika Kordrostami and Yuping Liu-Thompkins

This paper aims to examine the role of life satisfaction in consumers’ reaction to nostalgic music in an advertisement in terms of attitude toward the brand and purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of life satisfaction in consumers’ reaction to nostalgic music in an advertisement in terms of attitude toward the brand and purchase intention. It suggests that life satisfaction forms the lens through which individuals interpret and reconstruct past emotional experiences evoked by nostalgia. It further investigates the role of product category involvement in the interplay between life satisfaction and nostalgic music.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted. The first study featured a 2 (nostalgic vs non-nostalgic music) × 2 (high vs low involvement) between-subjects design and tested the research hypotheses with 208 consumers. The second study featured two involvement conditions (high vs low) and explored the underlying process behind the hypotheses. Linear regression was used to analyze the data in both studies.

Findings

For the low involvement product category, nostalgic music was more effective than non-nostalgic music for consumers with high life satisfaction, whereas non-nostalgic music was more effective for consumers with low life satisfaction levels. For the high involvement product category, life satisfaction did not moderate consumers’ reaction to nostalgic music.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that past experiences evoked through nostalgic music are not static but are subject to bias and interpretation depending on an individual’s current mindset. Hence, the eventual effect of nostalgia is determined by how past events are reconstrued based on the individual’s current state.

Practical implications

This paper warns against the blind use of nostalgic appeals in advertising, points to the need to consider the audience’s state of mind, and suggests an opportunity to leverage life satisfaction influencers in designing effective advertising campaigns.

Social implications

The findings have strong implications for public policymakers. The results are crucial as policymakers often use public service announcement (PSA) to change the attitude of the public toward some phenomena. Knowing the current state of life satisfaction in society, they can increase the efficiency of public service announcements by including a nostalgic song in them.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first one in the marketing literature that looks at the efficiency of nostalgic songs in advertisements. The authors tested the conceptual framework by using two studies and offered novel implications to both marketers and scholars.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Jiang Wu, Minne Zeng and Karen L. Xie

Although room-sharing platforms such as Airbnb have become globally prevalent business phenomena, no cross-cultural research has been conducted to examine how travelers…

Abstract

Purpose

Although room-sharing platforms such as Airbnb have become globally prevalent business phenomena, no cross-cultural research has been conducted to examine how travelers outside the “Western Bubble” perceive and respond to this sharing economy. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that affect Chinese travelers’ behavioral intentions toward room-sharing platforms in the sharing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on theories of motivation, the influences on travelers of utilitarian and hedonic motivation, perceived trust and past experience were investigated. Considering the characteristics of room-sharing, utilitarian motivation is measured by service experience, information acquisition, cost saving and resource efficiency. Hedonic motivation is measured by adventure, gratification, sharing and friend-seeking. Data were collected in online survey from 445 valid samples and analyzed by partial least squares (PLS) regression approach using SmartPLS 3.0.

Findings

The findings indicate that although intensity varies, utilitarian motivation, hedonic motivation and perceived trust do have positive effects on tourists’ behavioral intentions. Past experience with room-sharing moderates these effects.

Originality/value

There is scant research about consumers’ behaviors toward a sharing economy in Western countries and no empirical research in this field with analyses of Chinese consumers, although China is an emerging market in the hospitality industry. None of the previous research was based on theories of motivation and trust, especially without a consideration of the moderating effect of past experience. Therefore, this study aims to narrow these gaps and to combine, organize and extend previous studies to improve the analysis of behavioral intention in the sharing economy. The value of this study lies in the research model and analysis with the backdrop of China.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Yi‐Chun Huang, Yen‐Chun Jim Wu, Yu‐Chun Wang and Nolan Christopher Boulanger

The aim of this study was to draw on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and attempt to identify the factors influencing the customer decision to purchase via online…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to draw on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and attempt to identify the factors influencing the customer decision to purchase via online auctions, focusing on how managers selling via online auctions can modify product positioning and promotion decisions in order to make their offerings more congruent with these factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a survey instrument to collect data from Yahoo!Kimo website consumers in Taiwan, obtaining 450 samples which were analyzed with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Attitude toward online auctions, perceived behavioral control and past related experiences significantly and positively influence the intention to purchase on online auctions, whereas subjective norm does not have such influence. Additionally, past related experiences have a positive effect on perceived behavioral control.

Research limitations/implications

There has been a relative dearth of work on online auction customer behavior. By applying the TPB to online auction research, it was empirically supported that behavioral intention to purchase via online auctions is determined by attitude and perceived behavior control. Past related experiences were further integrated, discovering that they can strengthen perceived behavioral control.

Practical implications

Recommendations are put forward in order to help better align product positioning and promotion decisions in online auctions with customer attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and past related experiences. These constructs may also be capable of explaining employee actions in general managerial contexts, thus extending the contribution of the paper beyond the limited world of online auctions.

Originality/value

This study integrated online auctions, the theory of planned behavior and consumer decision‐making philosophies in order to develop and empirically test a theoretical framework of consumer decision making in online auctions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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