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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Melissa Goertzen and Nisa Bakkalbasi

In two previous papers, the authors discussed a text analysis method utilized to explore e-book usage across disciplines at Columbia University. To verify the method, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

In two previous papers, the authors discussed a text analysis method utilized to explore e-book usage across disciplines at Columbia University. To verify the method, the authors conducted focus group and interviews sessions with faculty members and graduate students to understand when and why e-books are used in conjunction with scholarly activities. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants answered eight pre-determined questions during one-on-one interviews and dual moderator focus group sessions. They were also invited to complete a questionnaire regarding e-book discovery, access, and use. All sessions were transcribed and the data were analyzed using grounded theory approach to examine emerging themes.

Findings

The findings suggest that faculty and graduate students use e-books for discontinuous reading and quick reference purposes. They value the ability to customize learning environments to suit immediate circumstances and needs. Frustration occurs when availability and accessibility are hindered by limitations imposed by platforms or licenses. Participants believe the library can advocate for users and work with vendors to develop business models that promote greater convenience and flexibility online.

Originality/value

The study complements and extends existing findings reported in earlier research utilizing a text analysis method. The results indicate that text analysis is a reliable assessment method in the examination of usage trends across e-book collections. Also, the study brings a human sentiment to the discussion of e-book discovery, access, and use. It provides the user community with a voice and left the authors with a deeper understanding of existing information needs on campus.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Nisa Bakkalbasi and Melissa Goertzen

Over the past decade, as the electronic book (e-book) collection continues to grow, Columbia University Libraries has been gathering information to develop policies related to…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past decade, as the electronic book (e-book) collection continues to grow, Columbia University Libraries has been gathering information to develop policies related to e-book acquisition, discovery, and access. The purpose of this paper is to investigate users’ e-book search behavior and information needs across different disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method utilizes text data from two sources: users’ e-book search queries that were entered into the libraries discovery tool called CLIO and e-book title words provided by the Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources (COUNTER) usage reports. The analysis involves identifying and quantifying certain words from users’ search queries with the purpose of examining the contexts within which these words were used.

Findings

The prominence of topical words such as “history,” “social,” and “politics” in the list was an interesting reflection on the kinds of works users were looking for, as were the terms “handbook,” “guide,” and “manual.” The high frequency of these words imply that users were searching for broad topics, reference works, or other collections of instructions, all of which are intended to provide ready reference.

Originality/value

Running search queries and e-book title words through a text analysis tool revealed new ideas related to what types of materials users search for and use. Text analysis of search terms and title words provided insight into the nature of e-book use, including broad topic (e.g. history), academic level of use (e.g. introductory), and genre/type (e.g. reference). While it is challenging to deduce reader intent from word frequency analysis, as text data remain widely open for interpretation, the methodology has significant strengths that drive us to continue to use in future studies.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Nisa Bakkalbasi, Damon Jaggars and Barbara Rockenbach

The purpose of this paper is to describe an assessment design for the Developing Librarian training program. The Developing Librarian training program created by and for…

1875

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an assessment design for the Developing Librarian training program. The Developing Librarian training program created by and for librarians and professional staff in the Humanities and History division is a two-year training program to acquire new skills and methodologies to support the digital humanities. The program is based on the assumption that learning must happen in context; therefore the training is project based with all participants engaged in building a digital humanities research site as a team. This approach enables participants to learn about new tools in a sustained manner that parallels the way humanities researchers are likely to use them.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to measure the success of achieving this goal, program designers defined three objectives: learn tools and methods that support the emerging research needs and trends in the humanities; create a more interesting and engaging work environment for librarians and professional staff; and engage effectively with the humanities research community across the University. Three methods/instruments were: Explicit Self-Reflections to assess what participants learned in each training unit; the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to measure how participants feel about their work before and after the training program; and the Skill Set, Knowledge and Attitude Assessment to be administered at completion to measure the effectiveness of the training program as a whole.

Findings

At the time of writing, the Developing Librarian Project is mid-way to completion, and implementation of the assessment plan is ongoing. Based on these self-reports, there is evidence that the training program has been effective, and participants have been successful in meeting most of the learning objectives identified in the units completed. While self-assessment of knowledge and skills may have its limitations, this technique is proving adequate and efficient for achieving the program’s goals. This method encourages experimentation and establishes failure as an important aspect of the learning process.

Research limitations/implications

An assessment approach such as this does not measure the impact of training and development on digital humanities research, but initiates a valuable process, highlighting skills gaps at the individual, and organizational levels. These data are important for identifying and implementing appropriate training opportunities for librarians supporting emergent research activities and for understanding what skills and professional preparation are needed for new staff recruited into the organization.

Originality/value

A successful training program should be benchmarked, evaluated in a substantive and systematic way, and improved continuously. A formal assessment plan, directly tied to clearly articulated objectives, helps assure that such a program is effectively evaluated, iteratively developed, and successfully implemented. The Developing Librarian Project provides a useful model of how an academic library can leverage assessment and evaluation processes to identify skills gaps and training needs and generate actionable data for improving staff learning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

G.E. Gorman

This issue aims to look into the subject of citation counts and whether they have an impact on the articles being cited.

805

Abstract

Purpose

This issue aims to look into the subject of citation counts and whether they have an impact on the articles being cited.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses Selgens list of citations that have been counted within such areas as: review articles, long articles, short publications and research fields as an example.

Findings

Finds that citation counts and impact factors can be easily manipulated.

Originality/value

Gives a strong view to a controversial subject.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Joan Stein

250

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Joan Stein

216

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Bernardo Bátiz‐Lazo and Thomas Krichel

Applications of information technology have been directly responsible for the increase in productivity of business, government and academic activities. Business and management…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications of information technology have been directly responsible for the increase in productivity of business, government and academic activities. Business and management historians have yet to contribute to better understanding such processes. This paper aims to address this shortcoming through the internal and organisational history of a system for speedy, online distribution of recent additions to the broad literatures on economics and related areas called NEP: New Economic Papers.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a first person account (partly autobiographical) which also includes interviews and the use of archived e‐mail correspondence.

Findings

The advent of the internet promised a revolutionary change by democratising the social institutions related to the creation and dissemination of academic knowledge. Instead, this story tells how participants slowly but steadily tended to replicate established institutions.

Social implications

This paper provides a story of the NEP project and shows how one person's drive could generate a broader community of volunteers (constituted by a large number of academics and practitioners who provide critical support for its functioning). The paper provides details of the social and technological challenges for the construction of the technological platform as well as the evolution of its governance.

Originality/value

There is no historiography in business and management history on how to deal with changes in archived material resulting from the application of information and telecommunication technologies. Given the rate of change for events in the third industrial revolution, this paper shows it is possible and indeed relevant to document events in the recent past.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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