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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Nicola Evans, Deborah Edwards and Phill Chick

The purpose of this mixed methods rapid study was to identify the barriers and facilitators to implement relational and environmental risk management approaches to manage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this mixed methods rapid study was to identify the barriers and facilitators to implement relational and environmental risk management approaches to manage suicidality in inpatient services.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this within a short timeframe, a rapid review approach was chosen. Both research (qualitative and quantitative studies) and non-research material (policies, guidance and reports) were retrieved. The review was conducted across five databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, EMCARE, PsycINFO and CINAHL for English language citations within the last ten years (2009 –2019).

Findings

A total of 17 primary research papers and a further 73 reviews and grey literature were included. There was evidence that the removal of anti-ligature equipment, by which regular checks of the environment to identify and remove ligature points and increased levels of observation are carried out well, reduces suicide in hospital.

Research limitations/implications

There is a gap in research investigating “engagement activities” eliciting exactly what they are and determining how they might be effective. There is a need for new innovative ways for managing risk of suicide in hospitals that bring together meaningful engagement and maintaining safety.

Originality/value

Keeping people safe during an inpatient stay in a mental health service is a core function of mental health practitioners. This paper brings together what is already known about risk management and highlights areas for further investigation.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Nicola Evans and Michelle Huws-Thomas

The aim of the review is to investigate the reasons for referral to this child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) service and determine whether these had been met by the service.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the review is to investigate the reasons for referral to this child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) service and determine whether these had been met by the service.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a retrospective case note analysis that was conducted of 66 referrals to CAMHS for children and young people serving a rural community of 132,000. Case notes were selected by the NHS CAMHS manager based on referrals during the pre-defined date set. Of the 66 referrals to CAMHS, 19 were not included in the analysis because they had not been accepted into the service. Data were analysed on the remaining 47 cases who were referred, accepted into the service and had been offered an assessment by the service.

Findings

General practitioners represented the most frequent health care practitioner to refer to the service (n = 33, 70.2%). Self harm, suicidal intent, thoughts or overdose represented the highest percentage of referrals to the CAMHS service (38.3%); depression, low mood and sadness represented the next highest figure (19%) and anxiety and depression (10.6%) broadly speaking 68% of referrals related to low mood. Out of the 44 cases that were examined, 14/44 (32%) were referred back to the GP and no specific intervention was provided. Interventions provided to five cases were unspecified.

Research limitations/implications

A number of opportunities for developing the service that allowed for a focus on the core business of helping children and young people with low mood were identified. One of the limitations of this retrospective review was the time frame selected because it had been identified as a particularly high period for referral into the service and may not have been representative of the usual trend.

Practical implications

This informed a training strategy and resource allocation and a redefinition of discrete roles within the service.

Originality/value

This study highlighted the evidence about where the demand was on this service and hence the requirement to focus on their core business. This evidence generated by the review prompted a redirection of resources within the service. Additional reflections and discussion informed the development of a new training strategy and a redefinition of discrete roles within the service.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2021

Nicola Evans, Rhiannon Lane, Gemma Stacey-Emile and Anthony Sefasi

The World Health Organisation found depression to be the fourth leading cause of disability in Malawi (Bowie, 2006) with the prevalence of mental health need in children and young…

Abstract

Purpose

The World Health Organisation found depression to be the fourth leading cause of disability in Malawi (Bowie, 2006) with the prevalence of mental health need in children and young people in Malawi estimated between 10 and 30% (Kutcher et al., 2019). One option to address this was to provide schoolteachers with skills and knowledge related to mental health so they can better support children. There is generally a lack of evidence of the utility or feasibility of school-based mental health literacy programmes in low to medium income countries (LMIC). This paper aims to report on a project to train schoolteachers in Malawi on aspects of mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of this project was to determine the acceptability and feasibility of delivering a training initiative in Malawi to teachers to better enable them to recognise and cope with school children who had been exposed to trauma and substance misuse.

Findings

Feedback was generated through the use of a specifically designed pre and post measure, focus groups, interviews and observations of the teaching delivery.

Practical implications

Teachers found the training built on their existing knowledge and they requested further opportunities for training and consultation about how to manage difficult presentations. It was evident that teachers did not know how to access mental health care or support for children whose needs could not be met by schoolteachers alone.

Originality/value

For a sustainable improvement for children’s mental health care in this context, further training becomes valuable when located as part of a network of joined up health and educational services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Norman Young, Nicola Evans and Elizabeth Bowring‐Lossock

The aim of this paper is to offer a framework that captures the clinical activity of mental health nursing academics.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to offer a framework that captures the clinical activity of mental health nursing academics.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an exploration of relevant literature and an examination of the practices of a team of mental health nursing academics, the key clinical activities that academics were engaged in were identified.

Findings

The Practice Engagement Framework offers a structure to identify the range and breadth of clinical engagement for nursing academics.

Originality/value

This framework might be useful for other mental health academics from other professional groups such as social work and occupational therapy.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Anne Cullen and Dennis McCornac

This paper aims to explore the two main viewpoints on Australia’s relationship with Asia; first, the highly visible informed pro-Asia protagonists, and second, pervasive public…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the two main viewpoints on Australia’s relationship with Asia; first, the highly visible informed pro-Asia protagonists, and second, pervasive public opinion as informed by history and the Australian self-image. The purpose is to present the polemic internal to Asian Studies and Business Schools currently. This paper postulates that only an (uncomfortable) whole-of-sector introspection would result in an authentic national narrative to drive mutual respect and business between Asia and Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The current dismembering of Asian Studies degrees and Asian Business specialisations at Australian universities indicates a waning national support to the production of Asian specialists able to link the Australian economy into the advancing Asian commercial dominance. But such an assessment would not be completely accurate. The authors argue that as an important component of Asian business and economics, understanding the current situation is vital to breathing life back into the Asian Studies and Asian Business Studies disciplines at Australian national universities.

Findings

This paper concludes that the responsibility for creating specialists should fall to the university sector but is currently defaulting to the business sector. This paper proposes that business schools need to be more active participants in Asian engagement strategies. Thus, Australian universities and disciplines such as Asian Studies and Asian Business must have the academic will and the business support to take up a major role in positive evolution of the Eurocentric elements that currently hold back meaningful engagement.

Originality/value

This is a current issue that needs to be addressed.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2009

M.E.O. Mamede, M.P.S. Miranda, R. Ritzinger, R.C.B. Godoy and E.S. Velozo

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the chemical, physical and sensory composition of three new varieties of acerola (Rubra, Cabocla and CMF 017).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the chemical, physical and sensory composition of three new varieties of acerola (Rubra, Cabocla and CMF 017).

Design/methodology/approach

The samples of ripe acerola were collected from the Active Germoplasm Bank of Embrapa Cassava and Tropical Fruits – Cruz das Almas/Bahia, from the species Malpighia emarginata DC and analyzed by using standard methods.

Findings

The findings were that the Rubra variety stood out among the others in terms of flavour and purchasing intention, probably due to its pH 3.60, total acid (0.83 percent malic acid) and Vitamin C (911.97 g ascorbic acid/100 g) which gave the variety a less acidic flavour. As regards size, the average acceptability of this variety was 6.01, statistically different from Cabocla (8.08). Total anthocyanins were also found to be the highest, 76.7 mg/100 g and therefore the antioxidant activity of the peel was greater (85 percent) compared with the other varieties, though not differing statistically from the CMF 017 variety. According to these results, the Rubra variety is the one which should be of most interest to producers.

Practical implications

The new variety often fails to exceed nutritional and organoleptic characteristics of existing varieties in the market with established acceptance levels. The paper evaluates the chemical and sensorial composition of new varieties of acerola fruit, which could be launched on to the market. It was observed that one particular variety had better sensorial and nutritive quality.

Originality/value

This kind of data is important both for consumers who want to buy the best quality fruit and producers who want to plant more of the better quality variety so that they can gain greater added‐value in the commercialization of the fruit.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2023

Martine Herzog-Evans

Following the ‘Sarkozy’ era (2007–2012), France has engaged in ‘zero-tolerance’ policies, which have brought an increasing number of people into the criminal justice system (CJS)…

Abstract

Following the ‘Sarkozy’ era (2007–2012), France has engaged in ‘zero-tolerance’ policies, which have brought an increasing number of people into the criminal justice system (CJS). In an already extremely impoverished CJS, these policies have led to serious financial problems and have made an already existing prison overcrowding problem worse. Consequently, the CJS has gradually opted for a McDonald (Ritzer, 2019; Robinson, 2019) type of offender processing, whether in prosecutor-led procedures (representing roughly half of all penal procedures: Ministry of Justice, 2019) or in the sentencing phase (Danet, 2013). A similar trend has been found in probation and in prisoner release (in French: ‘sentences’ management).

The prison and probation services, which merged in 1999, have since then been in a position to benefit from the 1958 French Republic Constitution, which places the executive in a dominant position and notably allows it to draft the bills presented to a rather passive legislative power (Rousseau, 2007) and even to enjoy its own set of normative powers (‘autonomous decrees’ – Hamon & Troper, 2019). By way of law reforming (2009, 2014, and 2019 laws), the prison and probation services have thus embraced the McDonaldisation ethos. Their main obsession has been to early release as many prisoners as possible in order to free space and to accommodate more sentenced people. To do so, the prison services have created a series of so-called ‘simplified’ early release procedures, where prisoners are neither prepared for nor supported through release, where they are deprived of agency and where due process and attorney advice are removed. Behind a pretend rehabilitative discourse, the executive is only interested in efficiently flushing people out of prison; not about re-entry efficacy. As Ritzer (2019) points out, McDonaldisation often leads to counter-productive or absurd consequences. In the case of early release, the stubborn reality is that one cannot bypass actually doing the rehabilitative and re-entry work. I shall additionally argue that not everything truly qualifies as an early release measure (Ostermann, 2013). Only measures which respect prisoners’ agency prepare them for their release, which support them once they are in the community, which address their socio-psychological and criminogenic needs, and which are pronounced in the context of due process and defence rights truly qualify as such. As it is, French ‘simplified’ release procedures amount to McRe-entry and mass nothingness.

Details

Punishment, Probation and Parole: Mapping Out ‘Mass Supervision’ In International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-194-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Josie Evans, Karen Methven and Nicola Cunningham

As part of a pilot studyassessing the feasibility of record-linking health and social care data, the purpose of this paper is to examine patterns of non-delivery of home care…

Abstract

Purpose

As part of a pilot studyassessing the feasibility of record-linking health and social care data, the purpose of this paper is to examine patterns of non-delivery of home care among older clients (>65 years) of a social home care provider in Glasgow, Scotland. The paper also assesses whether non-delivery is associated with subsequent emergency hospital admission.

Design/methodology/approach

After obtaining appropriate permissions, the electronic records of all home care clients were linked to a hospital inpatient database and anonymised. Data on home care plans were collated for 4,815 older non-hospitalised clients, and non-delivered visits were examined. Using case-control methodology, those who had an emergency hospital admission in the next calendar month were identified (n=586), along with age and sex-matched controls, to determine whether non-delivery was a risk factor for hospital admission.

Findings

There were 4,170 instances of “No Access” non-delivery among 1,411 people, and 960 instances of “Service Refusal” non-delivery among 427 people. The median number of undelivered visits was two among the one-third of clients who did not receive all their planned care. There were independent associations between being male and living alone, and non-delivery, while increasing age was associated with a decreased likelihood of non-delivery. Having any undelivered home care was associated with an increased risk of emergency hospital admission, but this could be due to uncontrolled confounding.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates untapped potential for innovative research into the quality of social care and effects on health outcomes.

Originality/value

Non-delivery of planned home care, for whatever reason, is associated with emergency hospital admission; this could be a useful indicator of vulnerable clients needing increased surveillance.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Gregory Nicholas de Boer, Adam Johns, Nicolas Delbosc, Daniel Burdett, Morgan Tatchell-Evans, Jonathan Summers and Remi Baudot

This aim of this work is to investigate different modelling approaches for air-cooled data centres. The study employs three computational methods, which are based on finite…

Abstract

Purpose

This aim of this work is to investigate different modelling approaches for air-cooled data centres. The study employs three computational methods, which are based on finite element, finite volume and lattice Boltzmann methods and which are respectively implemented via commercial Multiphysics software, open-source computational fluid dynamics code and graphical processing unit-based code developed by the authors. The results focus on comparison of the three methods, all of which include models for turbulence, when applied to two rows of datacom racks with cool air supplied via an underfloor plenum.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies thermal airflows in a data centre by applying different numerical simulation techniques that are able to analyse the thermal airflow distribution for a simplified layout of datacom racks in the presence of a computer room air conditioner.

Findings

Good quantitative agreement between the three methods is seen in terms of the inlet temperatures to the datacom equipment. The computational methods are contrasted in terms of application to thermal management of data centres.

Originality/value

The work demonstrates how the different simulation techniques applied to thermal management of airflow in a data centre can provide valuable design and operational understanding. Basing the analysis on three very different computational approaches is new and would offer an informed understanding of their potential for a class of problems.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

1 – 10 of 344