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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Siobhan Fox, Niamh O'Connor, Johnathan Drennan, Suzanne Guerin, W. George Kernohan, Aileen Murphy and Suzanne Timmons

The Model for Dementia Palliative Care Project will develop a service-delivery model for community-based dementia palliative care. Many countries provide dementia…

Abstract

Purpose

The Model for Dementia Palliative Care Project will develop a service-delivery model for community-based dementia palliative care. Many countries provide dementia palliative care services, albeit with considerable variability within these. However, little is known about what service providers consider to be the most important components of a dementia palliative care model. This study aimed to address this knowledge gap.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory design using a survey method was used as an initial phase of the wider project. A web-based survey was developed, piloted (n = 5), revised, and distributed within five healthcare jurisdictions: the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, Scotland, and Wales. The target population was health and social care professionals, policymakers, and academics interested in dementia and palliative care. Content analysis of open-ended questions identified common themes; descriptive statistics were applied to the closed-ended questions.

Findings

Overall, N = 112 complete surveys were received. Key care principles incorporated the philosophies of palliative care and dementia care; many described “holistic” and “person-centred care” as the core. Important individual service components were the support for carers, advanced care planning, information, education and training, activities for “meaningful living”, comprehensive disease management, coordinated case management, and linking with community health services and social activities. Barriers included poor availability and organisation of healthcare services, stigma, misconceptions around dementia prognosis, insufficiently advanced care planning, and dementia-related challenges to care. Facilitators included education, carer support, and therapeutic relationships.

Originality/value

This study, as part of the larger project, will directly inform the development of a novel service delivery Model of Dementia Palliative Care for Ireland. The results can also inform service planning and design in other countries.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Niamh O'Connor, Karim Farag and Richard Baines

Recently, food poverty has been subject to much academic, political and media attention following the recent reduction in consumer purchasing power as a result of food and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Recently, food poverty has been subject to much academic, political and media attention following the recent reduction in consumer purchasing power as a result of food and energy price volatility. Yet the lack of consensus related to food poverty terminology acts as an inhibitor in both identifying and addressing the issue in the UK, specifically as a separate problem to that of food insecurity. Misunderstanding of terminology is an impediment to identifying similarities and differentials with both developed and developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to address these issues and enhance political and academic discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory approach utilising secondary research was conducted to assemble sufficient information to ensure an extensive examination, consisting of several sources inclusive of academia, government and non-governmental organisations. The literature was screened for relevance following a broad search which primarily focused upon UK publications, with the exception of national data relevant to specified countries of USA, Canada, Yemen and United Republic of Tanzania (Tanzania).

Findings

Economic access, quality, quantity, duration and social dimensions were the common features identified in the majority of the literature. Based upon these elements the proposed concise definition was constructed as; food poverty is the insufficient economic access to an adequate quantity and quality of food to maintain a nutritionally satisfactory and socially acceptable diet.

Originality/value

This study provides a conceptual approach in defining food poverty. Comparative to the countries examined, the UK has significant gaps in understanding and providing strategies in relation to individuals experiencing food poverty, causes and symptoms, methods of alleviation and coping strategies. There is no peer reviewed paper clearly discussing the definition of food poverty, hence, this review paper is original in three areas: establishing a definition for food poverty; clarifying the relationship between food poverty and food security; and discuss food poverty in UK with international comparison.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Zheng Shen

This study aims to find how can fashion micro-influencers and their electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) messages increase consumer engagement on social media, focusing on…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to find how can fashion micro-influencers and their electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) messages increase consumer engagement on social media, focusing on micro-influencers’ influence, typology, eWOM content and consumer engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20,000 microblogs were collected from Irish fashion micro-influencers and analyzed through keyword classification and content analysis in NVivo. The determinants of eWOM persuasiveness for consumer engagement on social media were investigated based on Sussman and Siegal’s information adoption model.

Findings

The study finds that among the four types of micro-influencers, market mavens and their eWOM messages have the highest impact on consumer engagement on social media, and it presents a repetitive and persuasive eWOM model of market mavens to increase consumer participation. Also, the study discovers that micro-influencers’ occasion-related microblogs have an increasing impact on consumer interactions whereas microblogs with brands have a decreasing engagement with consumers on social media.

Originality/value

This study advances prior studies on the relationship between influencers’ eWOM messages and consumer participation on social media by the development of a persuasive eWOM model of micro-influencers to increase consumer engagement and fill in the lack of relevant literature. Also, findings provide actionable insights for marketing communication practitioners to persuade consumers to participate in eWOM communications and establish strong consumer-brand relationships on social media.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Meadhbh Campbell and Charlotte Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore mental health service users’ experiences of involvement in a clinical psychology course.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore mental health service users’ experiences of involvement in a clinical psychology course.

Design/methodology/approach

Five participants were recruited from a service user and carer group aligned to a university professional clinical psychology course. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Four superordinate themes, group processes, advocating, transforming and power, were drawn from the data, with ten subthemes emerging capturing experiences on the personal, professional and group levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study is not generalisable and has a small number of participants. However, many of the themes have resonance with existing literature.

Practical implications

Service user initiatives need to consider the personal and contextual issues that service users may have experienced prior to their involvement. The needs of service user initiatives may change over time. Such initiatives must evolve in conjunction with the personal and political journeys of participants.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored the experiences of mental health service users in clinical psychology training using a robust methodology. The current study suggests that eliciting these experiences highlights factors that facilitate involvement as well as the barriers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Niamh M. Brennan and Maureen A. Flynn

This paper seeks to review prior definitions of the umbrella term “clinical governance”. The research question is: do clinical governance definitions adequately…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review prior definitions of the umbrella term “clinical governance”. The research question is: do clinical governance definitions adequately distinguish between governance, management and practice functions? Three definitions are introduced to replace that umbrella term.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is applied to analyse 29 definitions of clinical governance from the perspective of the roles and responsibilities of those charged with governance, management and practice.

Findings

The analysis indicates that definitions of the umbrella term “clinical governance” comprise a mixture of activities relating to governance, management and practice which is confusing for those expected to execute those roles.

Practical implications

Consistent with concepts from corporate governance, the paper distinguishes between governance, management and practice. For effective governance, it is important that there be division of duties between governance roles and management and practice roles. These distinctions will help to clarify roles and responsibilities in the execution of clinical activities.

Originality/value

Drawing on insights from corporate governance, in particular, the importance of a division of functions between governance roles, and management and practice roles, the paper proposes three new definitions to replace the umbrella term “clinical governance”.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Maureen Alice Flynn and Niamh M. Brennan

The paper examines interviewee insights into accountability for clinical governance in high-consequence, life-and-death hospital settings. The analysis draws on the…

1010

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines interviewee insights into accountability for clinical governance in high-consequence, life-and-death hospital settings. The analysis draws on the distinction between formal “imposed accountability” and front-line “felt accountability”. From these insights, the paper introduces an emergent concept, “grounded accountability”.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews are conducted with 41 clinicians, managers and governors in two large academic hospitals. The authors ask interviewees to recall a critical clinical incident as a focus for elucidating their experiences of and observation on the practice of accountability.

Findings

Accountability emerges from the front-line, on-the-ground. Together, clinicians, managers and governors co-construct accountability. Less attention is paid to cost, blame, legal processes or personal reputation. Money and other accountability assumptions in business do not always apply in a hospital setting.

Originality/value

The authors propose the concept of co-constructed “grounded accountability” comprising interrelationships between the concept’s three constituent themes of front-line staff’s felt accountability, along with grounded engagement by managers/governors, supported by a culture of openness.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Prem Sikka

To stimulate debates about the creation of corporate governance mechanisms and processes which would help to secure an equitable distribution of income and wealth for workers.

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Abstract

Purpose

To stimulate debates about the creation of corporate governance mechanisms and processes which would help to secure an equitable distribution of income and wealth for workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on a political economy of income and wealth inequalities. It argues that corporate governance mechanisms and processes are rooted in particular politics and histories. The state is a key actor. It provides a brief history of the UK corporate governance debates relating to income distribution, industrial democracy and disclosures. It provides social data about the extent of income inequalities.

Findings

The paper shows that the UK lacks institutional structures and processes and mechanisms to enable workers to secure a higher share of the firm's income.

Research limitations/implications

The study primarily focuses on some aspects of the corporate governance structures, practices and income/wealth inequalities in the UK. Its implications could also be relevant to market‐oriented liberal states with “consensus” or “majoritarian” electoral systems.

Practical implications

To encourage debates, the paper puts forward a number of suggestions for changing electoral and corporate governance practices together with disclosures that could give visibility to income and wealth inequalities.

Originality/value

The paper links corporate governance debates to broader political choices.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Majid Khan and Rahizah Binti Sulaiman

Research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting highlights an increasing lack of transparency in the information reported along with concerns surrounding…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting highlights an increasing lack of transparency in the information reported along with concerns surrounding overall reporting practices. One area that needs exploration is how chief executive officers (CEOs) convey messages in relation to CSR. This paper aims to investigate the linkage between CEO’s statements (words and images) in relation to CSR and the performativity of such communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analysed CEOs statements from five Malaysian companies contained in 2016, 2017 and 2018 standalone sustainability and annual reports. The texts and visuals are analysed by using discourse analysis.

Findings

The findings uncover three main discourses (economic, environmental and social) along with other discourses (achievements and recognition and challenges). The texts and images are found to be lacking in clarity and consistency and in many ways leave the stakeholders to make their own conclusions about the reported information.

Originality/value

The research indicates that while the leaders can be more direct to their stakeholders, however, the opportunity is not always capitalised. Overall, the analysis suggests an increasing scientism in CEOs messaging in relation to CSR as a tool to enhance perceived accountability of the business. The study also suggests avenues for improvement. This paper contributes to the emergence of different types of discourses that are being upheld by CEOs in their statements on CSR in Malaysian context. The discourses identified provide interesting insights into how CSR is perceived by the leaders.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Jennifer Creese, John-Paul Byrne, Anne Matthews, Aoife M. McDermott, Edel Conway and Niamh Humphries

Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes…

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Abstract

Purpose

Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes and safety and human resources in healthcare organisations. This study aims to examine factors that influence workplace silence among hospital doctors in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A national, cross-sectional, online survey of hospital doctors in Ireland was conducted in October–November 2019; 1,070 hospital doctors responded. This paper focuses on responses to the question “If you had concerns about your working conditions, would you raise them?”. In total, 227 hospital doctor respondents (25%) stated that they would not raise concerns about their working conditions. Qualitative thematic analysis was carried out on free-text responses to explore why these doctors choose to opt for silence regarding their working conditions.

Findings

Reputational risk, lack of energy and time, a perceived inability to effect change and cultural norms all discourage doctors from raising concerns about working conditions. Apathy arose as change to working conditions was perceived as highly unlikely. In turn, this had scope to lead to neglect and exit. Voice was seen as risky for some respondents, who feared that complaining could damage their career prospects and workplace relationships.

Originality/value

This study highlights the systemic, cultural and practical issues that pressure hospital doctors in Ireland to opt for silence around working conditions. It adds to the literature on workplace silence and voice within the medical profession and provides a framework for comparative analysis of doctors' silence and voice in other settings.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Lauren Clark

The aim of this paper is to examine the role of children in an emergent Irish consumer culture and advertising from 1848-1921. In particular, the significance of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the role of children in an emergent Irish consumer culture and advertising from 1848-1921. In particular, the significance of children's gender and reading materials in the process of consumption will be evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of primary sources, literature and secondary sources substantiates this research.

Findings

By evaluating advertisements, magazines, school textbooks and children's literature from the 1848-1921 period, this article argues that Irish children were encouraged to engage with an emergent consumer culture through reading. This article also evaluates the importance of gender in considering children as consumers and it focuses upon a number of critically neglected Victorian, Irish, female authors who discussed the interface between advertising, consumption and the Irish child.

Originality/value

This article is an original contribution to new areas of research about Irish consumerism and advertising history. Substantial archival research has been carried out which appraises the historical significance of advertisements, ephemera and critically neglected children's fiction.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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