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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Neena Gopalan, Nicholas J. Beutell and Wendy Middlemiss

This study aims to investigate international students’ cultural adjustment, academic satisfaction and turnover intentions using ecological systems perspective and explores…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate international students’ cultural adjustment, academic satisfaction and turnover intentions using ecological systems perspective and explores factors that affect academic success and turnover by exploring three stages: arrival, adjustment and adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 208 international students enrolled at a mid-Western university in the USA. Confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling and mediational analyses were used to test hypotheses.

Findings

Findings indicate that self-efficacy, as a pre-sojourn characteristic, affects adjustment variables inclusive of cultural adjustment, affecting academic satisfaction and turnover intentions. Adjustment variables (coping, cultural adjustment and organizational support) mediated relationships between self-efficacy and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model moves the research forward by examining an ecological systems framework describing how individual, social, academic, cultural and institutional factors function in supporting international students’ transitions. Results may be generalizable to other large US universities with varying dynamics and resources available (or not) for international students.

Originality/value

Given the challenges international students face in the USA in adapting to both new culture and academic setting, it is imperative to identify what elements of their transition and academic environment predict academic success. This is one of the first studies testing the propositions derived from Schartner and Young’s (2016) model.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Neena Gopalan, Murugan Pattusamy and Kamala Gollakota

Numerous studies on Western samples exist on work–family conflict (WFC) and work–family enrichment (WFE). Generalizing such results to other cultures may lead to erroneous…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies on Western samples exist on work–family conflict (WFC) and work–family enrichment (WFE). Generalizing such results to other cultures may lead to erroneous interpretations of results. The present study emphasizes the role of different types of support on both work–family conflict and enrichment among university faculty in India.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to university faculty in India. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results based on a sample of 199 university faculty in India indicated that supervisor and coworker support did not significantly reduce work–family conflict but increased work–family enrichment. The type of family support (instrumental versus emotional) had an impact, particularly on work-family enrichment.

Originality/value

Research on work–family dynamics in India is still in its nascent stage. This study attempted to address this gap by studying both conflict and enrichment dynamics in the family and work lives of university faculty in India.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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