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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Morton Beiser, Alasdair M. Goodwill, Patrizia Albanese, Kelly McShane and Parvathy Kanthasamy

Refugees integrate less successfully than other immigrants. Pre-migration stress, mental disorder and lack of human capital are the most popular explanations, but these…

Abstract

Purpose

Refugees integrate less successfully than other immigrants. Pre-migration stress, mental disorder and lack of human capital are the most popular explanations, but these propositions have received little empirical testing. The current study of Sri Lankan Tamils in Toronto, Canada, examines the respective contributions of pre-migration adversity, human capital, mental health and social resources in predicting integration. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants are a probability sample of 1,603 Sri Lankan Tamils living in Toronto, Canada. The team, with a community advisory council, developed structured interviews containing information about pre- and post-migration stressors, coping strategies, and family, community, and institutional support. The questionnaire included the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview module for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Interviews were translated, back-translated and administered by bilingual interviewers.

Findings

Two dimensions of integration emerged from a factor analysis of integration-related items: economic and psychosocial. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that PTSD militated against refugee economic integration, whereas pre-migration adversity (but not PTSD) compromised psychosocial integration. On both measures, increasing length of residence in Canada, and gender (male) were predictors of good integration, whereas age at arrival had an inverse relationship with integration. Religiosity had a positive effect on psychosocial integration but a negative effect on economic. Favourable perceptions of the health care system predicted economic integration and non-family support predicted psychosocial integration.

Originality/value

Results underline the importance of studying integration as a multifaceted phenomenon, help explain why refugees integrate less successfully than other immigrants, and highlight the importance of including mental health and mental health-related issues in integration discourse.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Miriam Stewart, Laura Simich, Morton Beiser, Knox Makumbe, Edward Makwarimba and Edward Shizha

The aim of this paper is to design and pilot test a culturally tailored intervention that meets the support needs and preferences of two refugee groups.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to design and pilot test a culturally tailored intervention that meets the support needs and preferences of two refugee groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a multi‐method participatory research design and was conducted in two urban centres in western and central Canada. Support was delivered to Sudanese and Somali refugees (n=58), by trained peer and professional helpers, in face‐to‐face groups matched by gender and ethnicity and in telephone dyads. Participants completed three quantitative measures before (pre‐test) and following (post‐test) the intervention. Group interviews with refugee participants and individual interviews with peer and professional helpers conducted at post‐test, elicited qualitative data on perceived impacts and factors influencing impacts of the intervention. Service providers and policy influencers (n=22) were interviewed in groups about the implications of this intervention study for services, programs and policies.

Findings

There were significant increases in perceived support and social integration and significant decreases in loneliness following the intervention. Participants reported that they learned how to seek services and supports and how to cope with challenges faced by refugees. Service providers and policy influencers were impressed by the success of the intervention.

Originality/value

No peer support intervention studies focused on the unique support needs of African refugees have been reported. This pilot intervention study demonstrates the supportive power of like‐ethnic peers and could guide subsequent community‐based intervention trials and the design of culturally appropriate health‐related programs.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 1997

Les Gulko

Abstract

Details

Applying Maximum Entropy to Econometric Problems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-187-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Morgan R. Clevenger and Cynthia J. MacGregor

Abstract

Details

Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

R.S. Adrain, I.A. Armour and J.H. Bach

How do engineers inspect the inside of a nuclear reactor? Laser scanning can turn it into a normal television picture.

Abstract

How do engineers inspect the inside of a nuclear reactor? Laser scanning can turn it into a normal television picture.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1985

After contracting with a communications carrier, such as Telenet or Tymenet, and a database service, such as BRS or Dialog, setting up the Hayes Smartcom II to aid in…

Abstract

After contracting with a communications carrier, such as Telenet or Tymenet, and a database service, such as BRS or Dialog, setting up the Hayes Smartcom II to aid in database searching with the M300 or any other IBM PC can be a frustrating experience, especially if you rely on the manual provided by the company. Though Smartcom II will do a lot more than covered in this introduction, following the steps outlined here will provide a practical way to begin using it.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 2 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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