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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Yin Bai, Wei-ping Wu and Millissa F.Y. Cheung

This study aims to investigate the mediating role of shopping intention and the moderating roles of employee incompetence and consumer similarity in the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the mediating role of shopping intention and the moderating roles of employee incompetence and consumer similarity in the relationship between consumers’ personal traits and their shoplifting behaviors

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the authors develop and test a model that links personality traits to shoplifting intention and behavior. The results from a sample of 507 consumers.

Findings

The results from a sample of 507 consumers show that shoplifting intention mediates the effects of personality traits (materialism, alienation and sensation seeking) on shoplifting behavior. In addition, both employee incompetence and consumer similarity are found to moderate the relationship between shoplifting intention and behavior. The findings offer some useful theoretical and managerial implications.

Originality/value

Drawing on the TPB, the authors investigate how personality traits (i.e. materialism, sensation seeking and consumer alienation) influence shoplifting behavior via shoplifting intention. They find that the effects of materialism, sensation seeking and alienation on shoplifting behavior are mediated by shoplifting intention. More importantly, they also find strong support for the moderating roles of employee incompetence and consumer similarity on the relationship between shoplifting intention and behavior. While employee incompetence enhances the relationship between shoplifting intention and shoplifting behavior, consumer similarity negatively moderates the relationship between shoplifting intention and shoplifting behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Millissa F.Y. Cheung and W.M. To

This paper aims to explore the mediating role of effective employee involvement in the links between management commitment to service quality, employees' job satisfaction…

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6555

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the mediating role of effective employee involvement in the links between management commitment to service quality, employees' job satisfaction, and customer perceptions of service performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature on service management, the authors identified the role of effective employee involvement in the relationships between management commitment to service quality and employees' job satisfaction and between management commitment to service quality and customer perceptions of service performance. Using a random sampling method, the authors obtained 143 matched frontline employee‐customer dyads in the Macao Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China.

Findings

The results of the structural equations analysis show that effective employee involvement fully mediates the positive effects of management commitment to service quality on employees' job satisfaction and customer perceptions of service performance.

Practical implications

This study confirms that management commitment to service quality alone does not produce positive organizational outcomes, unless linked with effective employee involvement.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on service management by identifying the mediating role of effective employee involvement in the relationships between management commitment to service quality and organizational outcomes.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Millissa F.Y. Cheung

Our purpose is to examine whether and how perceived organizational support (POS) mediates the effects of informational and interpersonal justice on organizational…

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3516

Abstract

Purpose

Our purpose is to examine whether and how perceived organizational support (POS) mediates the effects of informational and interpersonal justice on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were randomly collected from 159 matched supervisor‐subordinate dyads of three engineering firms in Hong Kong in different sites and period of time.

Findings

Results of structural equation modeling indicated that POS fully mediated the effects of interpersonal and informational justice on citizenship behaviors that are directed at the organization (OCBO) and its members (OCBI).

Research limitations/implications

Cross‐sectional research design limits the reveal of causality in variables. The findings theoretically integrate justice with POS literature by distinguishing the unique effects of interpersonal and informational justice on OCBO and OCBI through the mediating role of POS.

Practical implications

The success of leaders lie in whether they are trained to comply with the informational and interpersonal rules as well as show respect and provide candid information to the employees on a daily encounter. Also, the leaders may help cultivating subordinates’ a favorable perception of POS by passing on clear messages to subordinates that organization cares about and accounted to them.

Originality/value

The use of POS as a mediator on distinguishing interpersonal and informational justice on OCB is unprecedented. Most justice research has been focussed on distributive and procedural justice or situational factors that moderate the justice‐OCB link. But, this study has strength of clarifying the links among interpersonal and informational justice, POS, and OCB on professional employees in a non‐North‐America context.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Millissa F.Y. Cheung and Chi‐Sum Wong

This study aims to examine the moderating role played by leaders' task and relations support in the relationship between transformational leadership and followers' level…

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30060

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the moderating role played by leaders' task and relations support in the relationship between transformational leadership and followers' level of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 182 supervisor‐subordinate dyads was randomly collected and returned from a restaurant, hotel, retail store, bank, and travel agent of Hong Kong.

Findings

Results indicated that the positive relationship between transformational leadership and followers' creativity is stronger when there is a high degree of leaders' task and relations support.

Research lismitations/implications

This study extends the leadership literature to better understand the effects of transformational leadership on employees' level of creativity are contingent on the nature of leaders' support. Sample size is a possible limitation.

Practical implications

Intensive training can be provided to supervisors or personality test can be used to screen for selected individuals who are high caliber for being a potential transformational leader.

Originality/value

An empirical examination of how leaders' task and relations support can strengthen the positive link between transformational leadership and employees' level of creativity that previously have been overlooked.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Jochen Wirtz, Robert Johnston and Christopher Khoe Sin Seow

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553

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Millissa Fung Yi Cheung and Wai Ming To

This study aims to use the framework of customer dominant logic to explore the mediating role of service co-creation on the relationships between customer involvement and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use the framework of customer dominant logic to explore the mediating role of service co-creation on the relationships between customer involvement and perceived service performance and between customer involvement and word-of-mouth (WOM). It also investigates the moderating role of customer relational-motivational orientation on the relationship between customer involvement and service co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect responses from 289 Hong Kong's customers in different service settings. Structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed research model.

Findings

The results of structural equation modeling showed that the freedom of co-creation and the degree of collaboration fully mediated the effect of customer involvement on perceived service performance and WOM. Additionally, relational-motivational orientation moderated the relationships between customer involvement and the freedom of co-creation and between customer involvement and the degree of collaboration.

Practical implications

This research provides implications to managers on how to facilitate an environment that stimulates customer co-creation. Customer-contact employees must be trained with the necessary interpersonal skills to serve customers with different levels of relational-motivational orientation.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to identify customer involvement as a key antecedent of service co-creation attributes and the moderating role of relational-motivational orientation on the relationships between customer involvement and service co-creation attributes.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Fung Yi Millissa Cheung and Wai Ming To

Service recovery is a challenge to organizations because customers will respond to recovery processes and outcomes differently. Yet, there are few studies that examine the…

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3339

Abstract

Purpose

Service recovery is a challenge to organizations because customers will respond to recovery processes and outcomes differently. Yet, there are few studies that examine the antecedents of customer co-recovery. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to adopt a customer-dominant logic to explore the antecedents of customer co-creation of service recovery (CCSR) and its effects on perceived justice and satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the service management literature and proposed a theoretical model that links customer involvement with service failure (CISF), customer CCSR, perceived justice, to customer satisfaction with service recovery (CSSR). The sample included 594 customers who had recent experience of service failure and service recovery in Hong Kong. The research model was tested using structural equations modeling.

Findings

The results of structural equation modeling showed that CISF had an effect on customer CCSR in the form of information sharing and co-production, and this effect influenced customers’ justice perceptions, which in turn affected CSSR.

Practical implications

The findings supported the notion that service management should be viewed from customer-dominant logic and effective facilitation shall be deployed to engage and support customers in service recovery processes.

Originality/value

The study contributes to service management by identifying the salient role and form of customer co-creation in making customers feel satisfied with service recovery.

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2018

Fung Yi Millissa Cheung, Kelly Peng and Chi-Sum Wong

The argument in this study is that employees differ in their motives in helping their organizations when they know that they may not be paid back for their efforts. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The argument in this study is that employees differ in their motives in helping their organizations when they know that they may not be paid back for their efforts. This paper aims to examine whether these motives will lead to greater extra-role contribution in an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of 124 pairs of employee in China have been used to develop and test the measurement of an “altruistic helping of organization” (AHO) in a pilot sample. In addition, AHO had been then tested as a motive for organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) using data collected from 245 pairs of employees in China.

Findings

Data from 124 pairs of employees in China have been used to develop and test the measurement of “altruistic helping of organization” in a pilot sample. The authors have proposed and validated whether procedural justice and conscientiousness predict for a new OCB motive – AHO, which explains for an incremental predictive power over the existing motives of OCB, namely, instrumentality, social exchange with the organization, organizational concern, prosocial values and impression management, on a data collected from 245 pairs of employees in China.

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross-sectional study. In addition, the authors have only taken in samples in China, which may not be generalizable to other context.

Practical implications

Practitioners can devote resources to encourage employees to help without any consideration of returns. In addition, the fairness perception of organizational practices – procedural justice and individual characteristics – are necessary to induce AHO and other OCB motives.

Social implications

This research provides that the social implication of arousing the basic underpinning of driving OCB is altruistic motive and not egoistic. This finding helps to stimulate individuals to have more helping behaviors towards the organization.

Originality/value

This study provides solid evidence for the suggestion by the original proponents of OCB that the distinction between rewarded and unrewarded criterion is blurred in OCB literature. Our findings suggest that altruistic helping does exist and that this explains for a significant proportion of extra-role behavior.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Fung Yi Millissa Cheung and Wai Ming To

The purpose of this paper is to explore how task- and relation-oriented customers co-create high quality services with frontline employees from the perspective of…

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1923

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how task- and relation-oriented customers co-create high quality services with frontline employees from the perspective of customer-dominant (C-D) logic.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the service management literature and identified a number of critical components that help service providers understand the psychology and behaviour of their customers, and how their customers perceive service encounters. The authors tested the theoretical model using a random survey sample of 707 consumers in Hong Kong.

Findings

The authors found that information sharing fully mediated the interactive effects of customer involvement and customer motivational orientation on customer perceived service quality and customer satisfaction. These findings support the C-D logic that customers as co-creators of value play a dominant role in service encounters.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contribute to the existing management literature by identifying the importance of the C-D logic for service delivery and management. In particular, the involvement of customers with different motivational orientations through information sharing significantly affects customers’ perceived service quality and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper enhances the understanding of customer’s logic by exploring the conditions and process between customer involvement and service delivery. Further directions for theoretical and empirical research are suggested.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Millissa Cheung, Kelly Z. Peng and Chi-Sum Wong

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the agreement between supervisors and subordinates concerning the motives of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and how…

Downloads
1582

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the agreement between supervisors and subordinates concerning the motives of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and how the supervisors’ attributions affect their OCB ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

With the permission of seven large organizations in Macau, the authors conducted a survey of 500 employee-supervisor-co-worker triads. The final sample stood at 176 such triads with three hypotheses tested.

Findings

First, supervisors are more accurate when judging altruistic motives of subordinates’ OCB than with egoistic motives. Second, supervisor attribution of subordinates’ altruistic motives positively affects the supervisors’ OCB ratings. Third, employees who are motivated by altruistic motives perform more OCB actions those egoistically motivated.

Originality/value

The study adds to knowledge of how supervisor attribution of subordinates’ OCB motives affects their evaluation of the subordinates. It also provides evidence about the effect of OCB motives on the actual engagement in OCB. Findings of this study support the work of Organ et al. regarding the motives behind OCB and strengthen the role of attribution theory in studying OCB.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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