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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Shih Yung Chou, Thuy Nguyen, Charles Ramser and Tree Chang

Integrating the social exchange perspective of helping behavior with self-determination theory (SDT), this study seeks to examine the impact of employees' psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating the social exchange perspective of helping behavior with self-determination theory (SDT), this study seeks to examine the impact of employees' psychological needs on perceived organizational justice and the impact of perceived organizational justice on employees' helping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional and cross-organizational data were obtained from 177 full-time employees employed in 12 small- and medium-sized oil and gas service companies. A partial least squares approach using SmartPLS was employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results illustrate that the psychological need for competence and need for autonomy are positively related to perceived distributive and procedural justice, respectively. Moreover, perceived distributive and procedural justice are related to helping behavior. Furthermore, perceived distributive justice fully mediates the relationship between the psychological need for competence and helping behavior, whereas perceived procedural justice partially mediates the relationship between the psychological need for autonomy and helping behavior.

Originality/value

From a theoretical standpoint, this study offers some theoretical explanations for how the basic psychological needs identified by SDT activate employees' perceived organizational justice. Practically, this study offers several managerial recommendations that help managers manage helping behavior in the organization effectively.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

A. Celil Cakici, Yilmaz Akgunduz and Oya Yildirim

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived price justice, satisfaction, revisit intention and loyalty among restaurant customers…

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2870

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived price justice, satisfaction, revisit intention and loyalty among restaurant customers, specially the mediating effect of revisit intention in the relationship between perceived price justice, satisfaction and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a questionnaire distributed to customer of restaurants in Turkey. A total of 304 restaurant customers participated.

Findings

Results from structural equation modeling show that price justice and satisfaction positively influence their revisit intention of restaurant customers, also revisit intention positively influences loyalty of restaurant customers. Also, the empirical results indicate that while revisit intention fully mediates the effect of price justice and loyalty, it partially mediates the effect of satisfaction and loyalty.

Originality/value

When the studies in the literature are examined, it is seen that there are various studies that deal with perceived price justice, customer satisfaction, revisit intention and loyalty variables from a different viewpoint. However, no study has been found on restaurants that investigate the relationship between these four variables and the mediating role of revisit intention. Furthermore, the authors’ study contributes to the hospitality and service management literature in two ways. First, the authors follow recent calls for studies on antecedents of revisit intention, with the aim of providing empirical support to uncover factor that shape customers’ revisit intentions. Second, the authors investigate the attitudinal mechanism that explains how customers’ perception of price justice and satisfaction in their loyalty by exploring the mediation effect of revisit intention. On the other hand, it is foreseen that the study will shed light on restaurant managers and provide healthy data for strategic planning. Additionally, that the results obtained are the practical purpose of the study is to contribute to the determination of product development and promotional strategies for restaurant managements.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Suna La and Beomjoon Choi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between perceived justice and perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the impact of perceived justice

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between perceived justice and perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the impact of perceived justice and CSR perceptions on customers’ behavioral responses, such as satisfaction and repatronage intention after service recovery. The authors also investigate the moderating role of service failure severity in the relationship between perceived justice and perceived CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using individually completed questionnaires. The proposed model was tested using structural equation modeling, and the moderation effects of failure severity in the relationship between perceived justice and perceived CSR were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression models.

Findings

The results suggest a path from satisfaction to CSR perceptions, which indicates that the link between CSR perceptions and satisfaction is reversed in the context of service recovery. The authors further reveal recovery satisfaction in two ways: It has a direct influence on repatronage intentions as well as an indirect influence via perceived CSR. Finally, the results demonstrate that the severity of a service failure intensifies the impact of distributive and procedural justice perceptions on perceived CSR, and perceived CSR serves as a partial mediator in the path from recovery satisfaction to repatronage intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The results demonstrate that perceived justice of service recovery affects perceived CSR after a service failure and that the severity of a service failure moderates the impact of justice perceptions on perceived CSR. However, the possibility of intercausal relationships among distributive, procedural and interactional justice may need to be further explored in future research.

Practical implications

Given that the impact of distributive and procedural justice on CSR perceptions has become more critical as the severity of service failure increases, companies should prioritize allocating a fair amount of monetary compensation in a timely manner, particularly for those who experience a severe service failure.

Originality/value

The authors propose a model of perceived justiceperceived CSR – repatronage intentions within the service recovery context in an attempt to deepen the understanding of the antecedents of repatronage intention and the relationship between repatronage intention and recovery satisfaction following service recovery encounters by introducing perceived justice and CSR. Moreover, the authors discover the moderating effect of service failure severity on the relationship between justice perceptions and perceived CSR.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Young Ran Joo, Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived overall justice and the moderating effect of self- and other-centered motives in the…

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2755

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived overall justice and the moderating effect of self- and other-centered motives in the relationship between organizational corporate social responsibility (CSR) and organizational attractiveness using a sample of job applicants.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested using a 2-by-2 experimental design and a sample of 376 South Korean University students.

Findings

The results showed that organizational CSR positively influenced job applicants’ perceived overall justice. Moreover, it was found that perceived overall justice mediated the influence of CSR on organizational attractiveness. However, contrary to the hypotheses, the indirect effect of CSR on organizational attractiveness through perceived overall justice was significant only for job applicants who attributed self-centered motives to CSR.

Practical implications

As it was found that job applicants who attributed other-centered motives to organizational CSR had high levels of perceived overall justice regarding organizations, independent of the actual level of engagement in CSR, it is crucial that organizations show sincerity in executing CSR. In addition, small- and medium-sized organizations may not have sufficient resources for CSR, but it is especially crucial for them to focus on CSR activities that are aligned with their business, implement CSR programs consistently, and focus on CSR itself rather than on advertising in order to facilitate, among job applicants, the attribution of other-centered motives to their CSR.

Originality/value

From the perspective of overall justice and attributed motives, this study intensively explores the internal mechanism by which organizational engagement in CSR influences organizational attractiveness among job applicants. In practical terms, this study shows that it is important for organizations to consistently invest in CSR with authenticity, even when CSR activities are insubstantial and doing so may be attributed to self-centered motives. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Gordon Liu, Lukman Aroean and Wai Wai Ko

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of supply chain (SC) justice practices in shared value-supplier delivery performance relationship and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of supply chain (SC) justice practices in shared value-supplier delivery performance relationship and the contingent role of trust in SC ecosystem operation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect and analyze dyadic survey data from a marina resort SC ecosystem in Indonesia.

Findings

The results suggest the differential moderating effects of two types of perceived SC justiceperceived procedural justice and perceived interactional justice – on the relationship between shared value and supplier delivery performance. More specifically, we find that perceived procedural justice strengthens the shared value-supplier delivery performance relationship, but that perceived interactional justice weakens such a relationship. Furthermore, the findings demonstrate a positive three-way interaction effect between shared value, perceived SC justice and trust on supplier delivery performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to introduce the role of SC justice practices in SC ecosystem operation. The authors examine how shared value interacts with perceived SC justice and trust in order to determine supplier delivery performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Shuqin Wei, Tyson Ang and Nwamaka A. Anaza

Drawing on the fairness theory, this paper aims to propose a conceptual framework that investigates how co-creation in the failed service delivery (coproduction intensity…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the fairness theory, this paper aims to propose a conceptual framework that investigates how co-creation in the failed service delivery (coproduction intensity) and co-creation in the service recovery affect customers’ evaluation of the firm’s competence, justice and ethicalness, and ultimately their willingness to co-create in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Tax services were chosen as the research context. A consumer panel consisting of individuals who live in the USA and have used tax preparation services within the past year was recruited. The first study explores what happens to customers’ ethical perceptions during a failed co-created service encounter. A secondary study investigates what happens to customers’ ethical perceptions in the event that the failed co-created service is recovered.

Findings

The findings show that customers’ perceptions of the firm’s abilities and ethics are impeded by coproduction intensity but favorably influenced by co-creation of recovery.

Practical implications

A sense of ethicalness and fairness is violated when co-created service failure occurs, but fortunately, practitioners can count on engaging customers in the service recovery process as co-creators of the solution to positively alter perceived ethicalness and fairness.

Originality/value

Failed co-created services represent an under-researched area in the marketing literature. Current investigations of co-created service failures have largely approached the notion of fairness from a perceived justice perspective without referencing ethical judgments. However, fairness is grounded in basic ethical assumptions of normative treatment. This research is among the first to highlight the importance of perceived ethicalness in the context of co-created service failure and recovery.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Dan Ni, Xin Liu and Xiaoming Zheng

This paper aims to examine how and when perceived narcissistic supervision influences subordinates' work engagement and counterproductive work behavior (CWB) based on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how and when perceived narcissistic supervision influences subordinates' work engagement and counterproductive work behavior (CWB) based on organizational justice theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Two-wave data were collected from 320 employees in a Chinese manufacturing company.

Findings

Subordinates' perceived interactional justice mediated the relationships between perceived narcissistic supervision and work engagement and CWB. Higher levels of subordinates' need for belonging strengthened the detrimental impacts of perceived narcissistic supervision on subordinates' outcomes.

Practical implications

Organizations should reduce the occurrence of narcissistic supervision, enhance subordinates' perception of interactional justice and pay more attention to subordinates' need for belonging in personnel and team arrangement.

Originality/value

Although research has documented the detrimental effects of perceived narcissistic supervision, little effort has been made to investigate how such effects occur and which factors might amplify such effects. This study identified the mechanism underlying the link between perceived narcissistic supervision and subordinates' outcomes and unpacked the moderating role of subordinates' need for belonging.

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Mingzheng Wu, Xiaoling Sun, Delin Zhang and Ci Wang

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB…

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1034

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB) of Chinese public servants. In this model, the authors assumed that job burnout mediates the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB and that moral identity moderates the relationship between job burnout and CWB.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 210 public servants in China participated in this study, and their characteristics were measured by self-report tools. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to test the moderated mediation model.

Findings

Analysis of the data demonstrated that perceived organizational justice, job burnout and moral identity influenced CWB. Moral identity moderated the relationship between job burnout and CWB, such that individuals with low moral identity are more likely to engage in CWB. Moreover, job burnout mediated the effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB, and the mediating effect of job burnout was moderated by moral identity. The indirect effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB through job burnout was significant among individuals with low moral identity but not among individuals with high moral identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the self-regulatory function of moral identity in preventing CWB.

Practical implications

The study offers several significant suggestions to reduce CWB in Chinese public sector administration, such as by improving organizational justice perception, recruiting and selecting individuals with reference to their moral identity and monitoring employees’ job burnout regularly.

Originality/value

The authors developed and verified a moderated mediated model on the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB. The study revealed that job burnout has a mediating effect on the perceived organizational justice–CWB relation, providing important insights into the processes through which perceived organizational justice affects CWB.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Mohamed A. Nassar and Michel Zaitouni

This paper aims to examine the relationships between perceptions of organisational justice, perceived competence of supervisor and perceived supervisory support (PSS) in…

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1027

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships between perceptions of organisational justice, perceived competence of supervisor and perceived supervisory support (PSS) in hotel employees in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees who worked in chain hotels in two cities completed questionnaires on each dimension. Principal component analysis and hierarchical regression analysis were used to evaluate relationships among the dimensions to test the hypothesis that PSS mediates the relationship between perceived organisational justice and perceived competence of supervisor.

Findings

Measures of organisational justice, perceived competence of supervisor and PSS were all positively related to one another. PSS partially mediated the relationship between organisational justice and perceived competence of supervisor.

Research limitations/implications

Results indicate that employees who perceive their managers to be supportive and their organisations to be fair and just also believe that their supervisors are more competent. However, these results are only a cross-sectional snapshot, and future studies could examine how employee attitudes change over time and what factors contribute most to establishing perceptions of managerial competence and trust in the organisation.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that organisations should develop policies that allow managers to foster supportive and transparent relationships with employees to establish confidence between employee and both manager and organisation.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to evaluate the mediating effects of PSS on organisational justice and perceived competence of supervisor in Egypt and in the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Jaime Ortiz, Tao-Sheng Chiu, Chih Wen-Hai and Che-Wei Hsu

The research framework of this study is based on tri-component attitude model (cognition-affect-conation) which explores consumers’ positive or negative emotions, as well…

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1529

Abstract

Purpose

The research framework of this study is based on tri-component attitude model (cognition-affect-conation) which explores consumers’ positive or negative emotions, as well as various types of thoughts and actions, triggered by their perceived justice in the context of service failure. This study aims to probe the possible mediating and moderating effects caused by the process where consumers form their thoughts and actions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducts a survey to consumers after restaurant dining. This study collects data from 262 respondents and analyzes the data with the structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived justice has significant effect on empathy, anger, positive word-of-mouth, repurchase intention and revenge. Empathy has a significant and positive effect on positive word-of-mouth. Anger has significant and positive effects on revenge and avoidance. Empathy is a mediator between perceived justice and positive word-of-mouth. Blame attribution and service failure severity are the moderators in the relationship between perceived justice and empathy/anger.

Research limitations/implications

Consumers might have experienced the scenarios described in the questionnaire and their responses might be based on recall of their previous dining experiences in other restaurants, thereby resulting in a time lapse problem and affecting the conclusions of this study.

Practical implications

It is not adequate to gain consumers’ choices just demonstrate favorable customer perceived justice and empathy in today’s industrial highly competitiveness because blame attribution and perception of service failure severity result in different positive and negative emotions and behavioral intentions. Therefore, food and beverage industry must have a various recovery approaches to recover service failure and create a more appealing relationship with consumers.

Originality/value

This study investigates the relationships among perceived justice, emotions and behavioral intentions which are seldom discussed in the past studies. In addition, this study investigates the mediating effect of empathy in the relationship between perceived justice and positive word-of-mouth. The results of this study indicate that blame attribution and service failure severity are the moderators between perceived justice and emotions (empathy/anger). The mediator of empathy and the moderators of blame attribution and service failure severity can enhance the research gap in the context of service recovery for the tri-component attitude model.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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