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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

József Poór, Allen D. Engle, Ildikó Éva Kovács, Michael J. Morley, Kinga Kerekes, Agnes Slavic, Nemanja Berber, Timea Juhász, Monica Zaharie, Katerina Legnerova, Zuzana Dvorakova, Marzena Stor, Adam Suchodolski, Zoltán Buzády and Ainur Abdrazakova

We explore the effects of three organizational variables (country of origin of the multinational company (MNC), the timing of entry into the European Union and the mode of…

Abstract

Purpose

We explore the effects of three organizational variables (country of origin of the multinational company (MNC), the timing of entry into the European Union and the mode of establishment of the MNC subsidiary unit) on the human resource management (HRM) practices being pursued by subsidiaries of large MNCs operating in selected countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the Former Soviet Union. Furthermore, we examine whether the degree of autonomy afforded to the subsidiary over its preferred HR recipes is related to overall local unit performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We profile the HRM practices of 379 foreign owned subsidiaries located in Bulgaria, Croatia, The Czech Republic, Kazakhstan, Poland, Hungary, Russia, Romania, Serbia and Slovakia. Using descriptive statistics, we present the general characteristics of the sample and we then use bivariate statistical analysis to test our hypotheses relating to the impact of different organizational factors on the HR practice mix implemented in the MNC subsidiaries covered in our survey.

Findings

We find a significant correlation between the annual training budget, the importance of knowledge flow from headquarters (HQs) to the subsidiary and the perceived criticality of training and development and whether the subsidiary is a greenfield site or an acquisition. A correlation was also found between the national timing of EU membership (older members, newer and then candidate countries and non-EU members) and three HR practice variables: the use of expatriates, external service providers and employee relations practices.

Research limitations/implications

Our research calls attention to the issue of balancing the efficiencies of standardization with the local preferences and traditions of customization which results in more successful MNC control and ultimately higher levels of performance. It also calls attention to the challenges in pursuing research of this nature over time in the CEE region, especially given the dynamic nature of the MNC mix in each of the countries.

Practical implications

Our findings serve to reduce the information gap on foreign-owned companies in CEE and the Former Soviet Union.

Originality/value

Despite some 30 years of transition, there remains a paucity of empirical research on the HR practices of MNCs across a number of countries in the CEE region. For a decade and a half, the CEEIRT group[1] has been systematically gathering empirical evidence. The combination of the breadth (10 countries) and depth (numerous items related to MNC subsidiary relationships with corporate HQs and patterns of HR practices and roles) characterizing the ongoing research effort of the CEEIRT collaboration serves as a mechanism for augmenting the empirical base on HRM in the region.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Michael J. Morley

The purpose of the paper is to introduce the special issue that brings together six papers exploring aspects of person‐organization fit.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to introduce the special issue that brings together six papers exploring aspects of person‐organization fit.

Design/methodology/approach

This overarching paper contextualizes the theme and introduces the selected papers.

Findings

The findings in this paper vary according to the core theme of each of the six contributions.

Originality/value

Combined the papers explore new avenues of enquiry in the person‐organization (P‐O) fit domain and showcase international theoretical and empirical work on the P‐O fit construct.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Michael J. Morley and Mary Flynn

Borrowing from earlier contributions in the cross‐cultural management and international human resource management literatures, firstly we conceptualise expatriate…

Abstract

Borrowing from earlier contributions in the cross‐cultural management and international human resource management literatures, firstly we conceptualise expatriate adjustment as a multifaceted construct encompassing work, general, interaction and overall adjustment and then we examine the impact of work‐role characteristics in the form of role novelty, role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload on these different domains of adjustment. With respect to adjustment, while our data, drawn from a postal survey of US and Canadian expatriates on assignment in Ireland, show some variations in work, general, interaction and overall adjustment, the composite measure of overall adjustment reveals that, on the whole, respondents are well adjusted to working and living in Ireland. Turning to the impact of work‐role characteristics on adjustment domains, role novelty is positively correlated with work adjustment. Both role ambiguity and role conflict are negatively correlated with work adjustment. Multiple regression results reveal that, combined, role novelty, role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload account for 31.1 per cent of the variance in work adjustment, 13.4 per cent of the variance in general adjustment, 17.2 per cent in the case of interaction adjustment and 17.5 per cent of the variance in overall adjustment.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/13620439710173652. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/13620439710173652. When citing the article, please cite: Thomas N. Garavan, Michael Morley, (1997), “Graduate assessment centres: an empirical investigation of effectiveness”, Career Development International, Vol. 2 Iss: 4, pp. 160 - 172.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Chris Brewster, Michael Morley and Ilona Bučiūnienė

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and contextualize this special issue of the Baltic Journal of Management and provide a route map for the reader through the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and contextualize this special issue of the Baltic Journal of Management and provide a route map for the reader through the various contributions.

Design/methodology/approach

This overarching paper contextualizes the theme and introduces the selected papers.

Findings

The findings call attention to the unique practice and research environment that is Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and highlight the varying trajectories of these economies during the post‐socialist transition.

Research limitations/implications

The evidence points to a dearth of research on contemporary management practice in CEE and suggests this research context to be an important test bed for the spread and institutionalisation of international practice.

Originality/value

Combined the papers explore aspects of the landscape of human resource management in contemporary CEE and showcase international theoretical and empirical work focused on this region.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Michael Morley

In addition to facing a number of special management challenges, the family company, defined as a business owned and operated by a family that employs several family…

Abstract

In addition to facing a number of special management challenges, the family company, defined as a business owned and operated by a family that employs several family members, must pay special attention to communicating with its stakeholders. Family companies share many stakeholder groups with all other companies. These include the communities in which they are based or maintain a significant presence as an employer; law makers and regulators who are influential in those communities or in the sectors of industry or commerce of importance; suppliers of raw materials, goods and services essential to the activities of the company; partners of various kinds in distribution, production or joint ventures; customers and consumers; employees and potential employees; and non‐family members of management. In addition, the family company has to ensure it maintains communications with certain specific groups. These are the family executives working in the company; family shareholders who are not employed by the company; and banks and financial institutions whose confidence in the company is essential as a source of capital. With all stakeholders in the first group, the company must seek to develop a positioning and communications programme that stresses the advantages of its status as family‐owned while countering any possible negative perceptions stemming from the same heritage. For the larger, longer‐established family companies which now have a large group of related shareholders and members of different branches of the founding family at work in the firm, systematic and effective family communications are of the highest importance.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Noreen Heraty, Michael J. Morley and Jeanette N. Cleveland

The purpose of this brief paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Journal of Managerial Psychology, focused on “Complexities and challenges in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this brief paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Journal of Managerial Psychology, focused on “Complexities and challenges in the work‐family interface”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first introduces the theme of the special issue, and a brief outline of each paper contained in it is given.

Findings

There is concern that progress in the work‐family research area has been somewhat restricted and may have failed to take sufficient account of the complexity of work‐family issues.

Originality/value

The literature on the work‐family interface is complex, and theory in the field is uncertain and under‐developed. The papers in this special issue should further understanding of the challenges and complexities underscoring the work‐family interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Michael J. Morley and Jean‐Luc Cerdin

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue which brings together six papers exploring aspects of intercultural competence in the international business arena.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue which brings together six papers exploring aspects of intercultural competence in the international business arena.

Design/methodology/approach

This overarching paper contextualizes the theme and introduces the selected papers which offer both theoretical and empirical insights.

Findings

The findings in this paper vary according to the core theme of each of the six contributions.

Practical implications

The papers in the special issue call attention to competences required for operating in the intercultural arena and offer a potential platform for developmental interventions.

Originality/value

The paper highlights how, combined, the papers explore new avenues of enquiry in the intercultural competence domain and showcase cross national theoretical and empirical work.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Michael J. Morley, Patrick Gunnigle, Michelle O'Sullivan and David G. Collings

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue, which brings together five papers exploring the changing anatomy of HRM at organisational level.

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue, which brings together five papers exploring the changing anatomy of HRM at organisational level. Design/methodology/approach – This overarching paper briefly contextualises the theme and introduces the five selected empirical papers. Findings – The findings in this paper vary according to the core theme of each of the five contributions. The first paper highlights whether the mix of distributed HR activities between the HR department and internal/external agents may be understood to be less a product of contextual influences and more a matter of corporate choice. The second paper establishes that role dissonance is a very real issue for middle managers with HR responsibilities. The third paper unearths the complexities and challenges involved in changing existing HRM procedures and practices in a post‐merger scenario. The fourth paper provides an understanding of the management of human resource supply chains and outlines five, empirically derived, generic models of HR outsourcing. The final paper finds that human resource IT diffusion and take‐up is primarily fuelled by interpersonal communication and network interactions among potential adopters. Originality/value – Combined, the papers offer insights on the changing anatomy of the HRM function against the backdrop of a dynamic contemporary organisational landscape and showcase cross‐national research on the theme.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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