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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Katalin Fábián

The essays in this book are a study on how globalization, as one of the main driving forces in economics, international relations, and cultures, has affected politics in…

Abstract

The essays in this book are a study on how globalization, as one of the main driving forces in economics, international relations, and cultures, has affected politics in post-communist Central and Eastern Europe. With the contributors paying particular attention to the changing nature of the interactions between various types of domestic institutions and international structures, this book attempts to interpret the process of economic, political, and cultural change in post-Cold War Central and Eastern Europe as it transformed from a relatively isolated corner of the world into a globally interconnected community with a European identity, based on democratic values and liberal markets. While Central and Eastern Europe entered and engaged so clearly, deeply, and rapidly in the multiple channels of globalization, there is a lacunae of reflections on this notable change, and only a few, often very specialized scholarly texts provide an account of how this region fared during this profound and multidimensional transformation. The analyses in this volume bridge this gap in a methodologically novel manner by combining the time-tested area-studies focus of various case-study countries and policies with the cross-disciplinary interpretations of the new theories of globalization.

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Globalization: Perspectives from Central and Eastern Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1457-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Hans‐Christian Pfohl and Rudolf Large

Describes the country‐specific conditions and developments inCentral and Eastern Europe, the risks and opportunities of sourcing inthis region and the measures necessary…

Abstract

Describes the country‐specific conditions and developments in Central and Eastern Europe, the risks and opportunities of sourcing in this region and the measures necessary to implement supply systems including eastern suppliers. In order to use the future capabilities of eastern companies, it will be necessary to shape long‐running, cooperative relations. Four major tasks of implementing procurement systems involving suppliers from Central and Eastern Europe can be distinguished: the establishment of an appropriate internal organization to facilitate sourcing in Central and Eastern Europe; the identification, assessment, and selection of eastern suppliers; the development of suppliers′ capabilities and performance; and the implementation of logistical and legal relationships between the buyer and the supplier necessary for the operation of the procurement system. Therefore, not only the purchase prices have to be considered in procurement decisions, but also any other related costs. Higher logistics costs and higher transaction costs are the prices which have to be paid for realizing large arbitrages caused by lower labour costs. Accordingly, the efficiency of sourcing from Central and Eastern Europe crucially depends on the ability of the western procurement managers to recognize specific conditions and to shape appropriate procurement systems. Then logistics and transaction costs will be endurable.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Nicholas Ridley

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe, focusing on the interactive factors of anti‐money laundering…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe, focusing on the interactive factors of anti‐money laundering, transitional economies and the underground illicit economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a comparative analysis of the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe.

Findings

The transition economies of central and Southeastern Europe face, and have been confronted for over a generation by, the interlinked problems of the transition stage post‐1989, the alternative or illegal economy, and the vulnerability of banking systems to money laundering. In contrast, by the 1990s, Western European central banks have become established as an essential government organ in macro‐economic policies.

Originality/value

Suggests an interesting lesson that might be gained from the experiences of central and Southeastern Europe and anti‐money laundering since the late‐1990s, where a national bank or central bank has not been essential, indeed has been comparatively unimportant, compared to the developed banking system led by the individual banks.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Borisas Melnikas, Petras Baršauskas and Vaida Kvainauskaitė

The paper aims to evaluate the problems and theoretical characteristics of integral cultural space development in the context of transition processes in Central and Eastern Europe.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to evaluate the problems and theoretical characteristics of integral cultural space development in the context of transition processes in Central and Eastern Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has used the outcomes of the research conducted over recent several years, dedicated to the diagnostics of the problems of transformations as well as economic and social development in Central and Eastern Europe with a special reference to the development of the integral cultural space.

Findings

Major findings show that the creation and development of the integral cultural space in Europe is a very complex and controversial process, and in this course various problems and conflicts arise. Therefore, to encourage the creation of the integral cultural space in Europe appropriate cultural policies need to be implemented in Europe. These policies may embrace many priorities including the preservation of cultural diversity, adaptation and dissemination of integrated European dimensions and elimination of inappropriate factors within humanism and democracy of all European countries.

Practical implications

For implementation of key priorities of cultural policies the use of a number of pan‐European scale special programmes is suggested.

Originality/value

The new non‐traditional ideas of possible economic and social development in Central and Eastern Europe are discussed.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2019

Ludmila Novacka, Kamil Pícha, Josef Navratil, Cafer Topaloglu and Roman Švec

This paper aims to assess how a hotel geographical location in different parts of Central and Eastern Europe influences the complexity of perception of pro-environmental behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess how a hotel geographical location in different parts of Central and Eastern Europe influences the complexity of perception of pro-environmental behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

To find out, whether hotel location in a specific country influences the complexity of environmental practices, this study used two closely connected multivariate statistical techniques analyzing gradients: principal components analysis and partial redundancy analysis. The research comprises data collection from seven countries in Central and Eastern Europe. In all, 25 randomly selected hotels (based on star rating) from various countries were approached to complete a questionnaire. Environmental practices were studied based on motivations, perception of barriers, perception of support from different levels of public sector, will of managers to promote pro-environmental measures based on sufficient funding, perception of legislation and perception of various other important factors.

Findings

The study reveals significant differences between hotels in Central Europe and Eastern Europe in the perception of the complexity in implementation of the environmental practices by hotel managers. The character of the present study, however, needs to address the identification of particular aspects that are relevant to the geographical differences among the studied countries.

Research limitations/implications

Research was limited to a selection of Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. There is still probability that managers in hotels from Poland and Croatia could possess different preferences. Other limitation of this study is that only special part of hotels were asked – hotels certified by star grading, out of our scope remained other hotels. It is also known that important factor is precise location of hotel within country – hotels in established tourism destination behave other way that those outside recreational areas. These factors deserve further study within this topic. There are many aspects of sustainability and environmental protection regarding hotel industry. As we have found in our principal correspondence analysis, different environmental measures were different location in biplot – some were affected by country, the other by star grading and affiliation to hotel chain. The complexity deserves to be studied in depth.

Practical implications

The importance lies first in the identification of the aspects that are governed by geographical differences among the countries studied. These aspects are the initiatives and support from the government and the local governments, which counteract the perception that there is a lack of financial resources and the return on investments is slow. So, based on the data, which included information from various types of hotels from seven CEE countries, the activities of national and local authorities were identified to be the main differentiating variable. The support of the environment-friendly conduct of business in the hotel industry is appreciated by hotel managers from Central Europe. On the other hand, hotel managers from Eastern Europe do not feel any significant support from either national or other public institutions. The second factor of differentiation is represented by the perception of the lack of funds. Hotel managers from Eastern Europe feel strongly about funds limitation. The coherence of both those factors is obvious in the results, as they show the same direction but opposite orientation. It has already been discussed above. When looking at the results, the authors find the perception of availability of funds to be a fundamental difference between hotel management in Central Europe and in Eastern Europe. The lack of funds is perceived more intensively in Eastern Europe than in Central Europe, particularly because of a stronger awareness of direct or indirect support for such activities by national and other public institutions in Central Europe.

Social implications

The differentiation of the aspects mentioned above comes from the social and culture policies, company policies and business cultures between these two sub-realms. Pro-environmental actions are apparently promoted less publicly in Eastern European countries than in Central European countries. The reaction to the trend for demand of greener hotels is stronger in the West, and its hotels are more likely to have legislation requirements and public support as an incentive to adopt pro-environmental measures in their business operations.

Originality/value

The study is based on data obtained from seven countries. The results revealed a problem of the macro-environmental influence on hotels’ potential to implement environmentally sustainable approaches and procedures throughout the industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Alastair Adair, Suzanne Allen, Jim Berry and Stanley McGreal

This paper seeks to assess issues of data and the extent to which property markets are becoming more transparent in Central and Eastern Europe, discussing stages in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess issues of data and the extent to which property markets are becoming more transparent in Central and Eastern Europe, discussing stages in the transformation and evolution of markets with reference to sources of real estate information.

Design/methodology/approach

Current perspectives on data sharing and drivers for change in Central and Eastern Europe draw on evidence from structured interviews with key market players in the region. This is supported by a consideration of secondary data sources.

Findings

The analysis indicates that information on stock characteristics, notably offices, has developed since the start of the 1990s but there remains an absence of performance benchmarking in the investment market. Conclusions highlight the significant process of change but identify the need for property investment markets to be more accurately measured and tracked.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations arise from data, in particular restricted time series data, lack of disclosure of data due to their intrinsic value, the perceived benefit of holding a competitive advantage and issues arising from the compatibility between various data sources.

Originality/value

The paper considers the relationship between the availability of market data and the development of properly functioning markets in Central and Eastern Europe; the attributes that have encouraged the development, availability and effective use of property market data; and the impacts of data availability on patterns of property market development in Central and Eastern Europe.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Eric Frank and Roger Bennett

This monograph is devoted to the countries of Eastern Europe, whichare experiencing the dramatic changes following on from the fundamentaldevelopments of the last few…

Abstract

This monograph is devoted to the countries of Eastern Europe, which are experiencing the dramatic changes following on from the fundamental developments of the last few years. These countries, Albania, Bulgaria, Czecho‐slovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, the USSR and Yugoslavia, are likely to become members of a greater Europe in the future. Their economic and educational systems are examined and the structures of their management training systems are described.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Nikolay Popov and Teodora Genova

The authors of this chapter focus on the development of comparative education in 10 countries of Eastern and Central Europe. A historical approach is applied to the study…

Abstract

The authors of this chapter focus on the development of comparative education in 10 countries of Eastern and Central Europe. A historical approach is applied to the study of the main characteristics of comparative education. The first part of the chapter is devoted to the origin of comparative education studies in this region from the fifteenth to seventeenth centuries till the end of the nineteenth century. The second part of the chapter examines the process of establishment of comparative education as a science and the appearance of the first lecture courses on comparative education in some countries of this region from the beginning of the twentieth century till the end of World War II. The third part presents the state of comparative education during the years of socialism – from the end of World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall. The fourth part surveys the modern development of comparative education in Eastern and Central Europe from the beginning of democratic changes in 1989 to the present day. While presenting comparative education in each historical period, the authors first show the most prominent comparativists, then emphasize on comparative education as a university discipline, and finally synthesize the main characteristics of the development of comparative education during the period of view. The chapter concludes with some generalizations on the four periods.

Details

Comparative and International Education: Survey of an Infinite Field
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-392-2

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2017

Gabriela Carmen Pascariu and Ramona Ţigănaşu

The unequal distribution of economic activities, transposed in economic, social and territorial disparities is the general characteristic of the European economy. Gaps…

Abstract

The unequal distribution of economic activities, transposed in economic, social and territorial disparities is the general characteristic of the European economy. Gaps increased in the context of European Union (EU) enlargement towards Eastern and Central Europe and of the economic crisis, thus bringing new differentiations among member states’ economies. The main aim of the chapter is to emphasise the centre-periphery differentiations in the European economy, by using a composite index of peripherality, in order to better understand the determinants of growth and convergence in Central and Eastern European countries and to reach normative conclusions for increasing Cohesion Policy (CP) effectiveness. The first part of the chapter provides a short overview of the main theories and models of the peripherality analysis and the relationships between the centre and the periphery, in order to find out how this analysis relates to the research in the field. The second part provides a comparative analysis of the evolution of European economies during 2003–2014, in order to find out whether the EU enlargement process stabilised the EU core-periphery pattern or, on the contrary, the process of core-periphery structural convergence occurred. The third part includes the suggested model of analysis (methodology, data, and main results) from a multidisciplinary perspective, underlining the centre-periphery differentiations on the two axes, North–South and West–East. The results have been interpreted in conclusions, with a focus on their relevance for the European CP challenges.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Katalin Fábián

The international women's movement has always focused on discrimination against women, but only in the past few decades have activists been focusing on violence against…

Abstract

The international women's movement has always focused on discrimination against women, but only in the past few decades have activists been focusing on violence against women, and within this framework, domestic violence. Global feminist activism found common ground in protecting women from physical, sexual, and emotional abuse. This framework traveled to Eastern Europe with the advent of regime changes there. In post-communist Europe, it took only a decade and a half for the Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, and Slovene governments to react to domestic and global pressures and establish new definitions and policies regarding domestic violence. However, the feminist NGOs’ definitions and policy recommendations met with limited success. Feminist-inspired norms, such as specific domestic violence courts and distancing ordinances, diffused to a mediocre level of half-hearted official responses in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). This middle-of-the-road approach attempted to de-gender and thus to de-politicize feminists’ fundamental gender-sensitive claims. A norm diffusion to reach the middle ground took place through a complex set of interactions that involved various types of political actors ranging from international governmental organizations, such as the UN and the EU, governments, international and local NGOs. Analyzing the process of these multiple-level and manifold interactions sheds light on the partially deterritorialized nature of globalization. The development of norms and their difffnousion regarding domestic violence policy also inform us about how democratic processes, efforts to achieve gender equality, and the global context interact in CEE.

Details

Globalization: Perspectives from Central and Eastern Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1457-7

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