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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Matt Fossey, Lauren Godier-McBard, Elspeth A. Guthrie, Jenny Hewison, Peter Trigwell, Chris J. Smith and Allan O. House

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges that are experienced by staff responsible for commissioning liaison psychiatry services and to establish if these are shared…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges that are experienced by staff responsible for commissioning liaison psychiatry services and to establish if these are shared by other health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-methods design, the findings from a mental health commissioner workshop (n = 12) were used to construct a survey that was distributed to health care professionals using an opportunistic framework (n = 98).

Findings

Four key themes emerged from the workshop, which was tested using the survey. The importance of secure funding; a better understanding of health care systems and pathways; partnership working and co-production and; access to mental health clinical information in general hospitals. There was broad convergence between commissioners, mental health clinicians and managers, except in relation to gathering and sharing of data. This suggests that poor communication between professionals is of concern.

Research limitations/implications

There were a small number of survey respondents (n = 98). The sampling used an opportunistic framework that targeted commissioner and clinician forums. Using an opportunistic framework, the sample may not be representative. Additionally, multiple pairwise comparisons were conducted during the analysis of the survey responses, increasing the risk that significant results were found by chance.

Practical implications

A number of steps were identified that could be applied in practice. These mainly related to the importance of collecting and communicating data and co-production with commissioners in the design, development and monitoring of liaison psychiatry services.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has specifically considered the challenges associated with the commissioning of liaison psychiatry services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Graham Turpin, Roslyn Hope, Ruth Duffy, Matt Fossey and James Seward

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems, access to…

Abstract

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems, access to these services is still dramatically underdeveloped and uneven. Estimates of untreated problems such as depression and anxiety in primary care signal the extent of these problems and the scale of investment in new services, if these needs are to be adequately met in the future.The Department of Health's and the Care Services Improvement Partnership's (CSIP) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme sets out a framework and a series of co‐ordinated actions, including two national demonstration sites, to begin to address these issues in England.This paper examines the origins and policy drivers that have given rise to the IAPT programme, outlines the progress to date and specifically assesses the implications for the mental health workforce of this programme. Issues addressed include the workforce profiles of existing services, career frameworks for psychological therapists, the capacity of training providers to train new and existing staff in psychological therapies and the challenges implicit in devising a workforce delivery plan to support the IAPT programme.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2018

Ole Martin Nordaunet and Knut Tore Sælør

The purpose of this paper is to explore two research questions: how do people with concurrent substance abuse and mental health disorders (concurrent conditions) experience and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore two research questions: how do people with concurrent substance abuse and mental health disorders (concurrent conditions) experience and describe meaningful activities? And how do meaningful activities influence the recovery process?

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses an explorative and interpretive design in a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Transcribed interviews are analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method for researching lived experience. The study was submitted to the Norwegian Center for Research Data where it was approved (Case No. 54661).

Findings

Structural analysis resulted in three overarching themes: achieving a positive identity through actions and feeling worthwhile; physically outside but inside the norms of society, and idleness, isolation, and obstacles on the road to recovery. Meaningful activities, considered a cornerstone in the recovery process, vary widely and are primarily described in social contexts, thereby confirming the significance of social aspects of recovery in addition to recovery as an individual journey. The findings also show that experiencing meaningful activities contributes to recovery capital and the development of recovery-promotive identities.

Research limitations/implications

The study consisted of a small sample size, recruited at one location which served as a primary research limitation.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights for health care practitioners and health care decision makers regarding the importance of meaningful activities viewed through a recovery perspective.

Originality/value

Few studies to date have used a comprehensive approach to describe the influence of experiencing meaningful activities on the recovery process.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Mr Geoffrey Vickerman, Head of BOCM Silcock's Seed Crushing Business, retires on March 29th after 43 years with the company. Mr Vickerman, who has been working from the company's…

Abstract

Mr Geoffrey Vickerman, Head of BOCM Silcock's Seed Crushing Business, retires on March 29th after 43 years with the company. Mr Vickerman, who has been working from the company's office at Hull, is succeeded by Mr A. N. S. Henderson, who will be operating mainly from the Company's Head Office at Basingstoke, Hants.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Subhash C. Kundu, Sandeep Kumar and Kusum Lata

The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of perceived role clarity on innovative work behavior (IWB) through the mediation of intrinsic motivation and job involvement.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of perceived role clarity on innovative work behavior (IWB) through the mediation of intrinsic motivation and job involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered from 613 employees belonging to 196 organizations operating in India. Data were analyzed using statistical tools such as exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, multiple regressions and bootstrapping via PROCESS.

Findings

Initially, the results of correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that the perceived role clarity has positive relation with intrinsic motivation, job involvement and IWB. Further, bootstrap analysis revealed that intrinsic motivation and job involvement individually and serially mediate the effect of perceived role clarity on IWB.

Research limitations/implications

The study highlights the importance of the perceived role clarity in developing positive work attitudes and innovative behavior among employees. Self-reported survey and cross-sectional design are the limitations of the current study.

Practical implications

The study suggests that organizations should strive constantly to enhance perceptions of role clarity among employees so that they remain motivated and involved in their jobs and exhibit innovative behavior at work.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the only study to test the impact of perceived role clarity on IWB with the serial mediation of intrinsic motivation and job involvement.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Beatrice Godwin

Government guidelines promote service user consultation without providing extensive advice on people in later dementia. “Seen as too difficult to involve, they are effectively…

Abstract

Purpose

Government guidelines promote service user consultation without providing extensive advice on people in later dementia. “Seen as too difficult to involve, they are effectively excluded from […] influenc(ing) service provision”, especially institutional care residents (Clare and Cox, 2003, p. 936). This hard-to-reach group presents methodological challenges. The purpose of this paper is to explore innovative approaches, offering even those with fragmented or lost speech the opportunity to contribute to decisions about their care.

Design/methodology/approach

This specialist dementia home consultation included staff and every resident, irrespective of the level of their communication impairment. Consultation on potential colour schemes took the form of a ballot. Staff helped develop an unpatronising, person-centred approach. Visual aids supported communication, de-emphasising the spoken word and promoting inclusion.

Findings

The majority of residents appeared to express an opinion on the potential decor. Others chose a colour while not necessarily grasping the context. The approach engaged all except four.

Research limitations/implications

Even people with moderate/advanced dementia may be enabled to participate in consultation. Further research needs to refine methodology to include everyone and clarify the interpretation of results.

Practical implications

Service providers may widen their expectations of inclusivity in consultation exercises.

Originality/value

This consultation is important to researchers and practitioners because it explores ways of communicating, which avoid privileging the spoken word, revealing seldom-recognised abilities in people with moderate/advanced dementia.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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