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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Anna L. Green, Aretha Y. Hill, Earnest Friday and Shawnta S. Friday

To provide practitioners and researchers with a framework for using individuals' multiple intelligences (MI) to enhance team productivity.

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Abstract

Purpose

To provide practitioners and researchers with a framework for using individuals' multiple intelligences (MI) to enhance team productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a general review paper that examines how the theory of MI as espoused by Gardner may be used to enhance the productivity of teams. Based on its use in organizational training, it is suggested that MI theory can and should be applied in the context of organizational teams. This descriptive paper is divided into the following sections: literature reviews of team development, team building, MI, and the use of MI in organizational training; and the development of a framework for using MI to enhance team productivity.

Findings

Provides information about how individual team members' varying degrees of the eight MI espoused by Gardner may be used to enhance their contributions to the team. Suggests that the enhanced contributions from team members will lead to enhanced team productivity, and ultimately, enhanced organizational productivity.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical research is needed to test the MI and team productivity framework presented. Additionally, from a conceptual and empirical perspective, the relationship between team productivity and other contemporary dimensions of intelligence, such as cultural, emotional, and practical intelligences, need to be investigated.

Practical implications

A very useful framework for managers to use as a tool to enhance the productivity of their teams by encouraging members to use their complementary intelligences to successfully accomplish team goals.

Originality/value

No other paper offers managers a practical framework to encourage team members to use more than just their written and verbal intelligences to complete an assigned task.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Michael Feldstein

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Abstract

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Martin Weller

The purpose of this paper is to show that the online learning environment can be seen as the means by which higher education can explore the challenges and opportunities raised by

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that the online learning environment can be seen as the means by which higher education can explore the challenges and opportunities raised by online and digital society.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that the online learning environment can be seen as a metaphor for how universities respond to the requirements and challenges of the digital age. Current learning management systems (LMSs) are examined, and compared with the values found in web 2.0 and social media. Current thinking on pedagogy for online learning is then examined. The SocialLearn project at the Open University in the UK is then explained, which seeks to create a disaggregated, decentralised, social system for learners.

Findings

The conclusion from the analysis is that there is a conflict between the centralised learning management system (LMS) and the requirements of online pedagogy. The traditional LMS can be seen as embodying the wrong metaphor, that of the traditional classroom. The paper concludes by arguing that such learning environments will be more useful to higher education in coming to understand its response to many of the changes being seen in society, which are facilitated by the new technologies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a framework for considering LMSs and their relation to universities and pedagogy, and an argument for the promotion of more decentralised systems.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2023

Lan H. Phan and Peter T. Coleman

For decades, conflict resolution (CR) educators working cross-culturally have struggled with a fundamental dilemma – whether to offer western, evidence-based approaches through a…

Abstract

Purpose

For decades, conflict resolution (CR) educators working cross-culturally have struggled with a fundamental dilemma – whether to offer western, evidence-based approaches through a top-down (prescriptive) training process or to use a bottom-up (elicitive) strategy that builds on local cultural knowledge of effective in situ conflict management. This study aims to explore which conditions that prompted experienced CR instructors to use more prescriptive or elicitive approaches to such training in a foreign culture and the implications for training outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

There are two parts to this study. First, the authors conducted a literature review to identify basic conditions that might be conducive to conducting prescriptive or elicitive cross-cultural CR training. The authors then tested the identified conditions in a survey with experienced CR instructors to identify different conditions that afforded prescriptive or elicitive approaches. Exploratory factor analysis and regression were used to assess which conditions determined whether a prescriptive or elicitive approach produced better outcomes.

Findings

In general, although prescriptive methods were found to be more efficient, elicitive methods produced more effective, culturally appropriate, sustainable and culturally sensitive training. Results revealed a variety of instructor, participant and contextual factors that influenced whether a prescriptive or elicitive approach was applied and found to be more suitable.

Originality/value

This study used empirical survey data with practicing experts to provide insight and guidance into when to use different approaches to CC-CR training effectively.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Shirley Alexander

The focus of much e‐learning activity is upon the development of courses and their resources. Successful e‐learning takes place within a complex system involving the student…

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Abstract

The focus of much e‐learning activity is upon the development of courses and their resources. Successful e‐learning takes place within a complex system involving the student experience of learning, teachers’ strategies, teachers’ planning and thinking, and the teaching/learning context. Staff development for e‐learning focuses around the level of technological delivery strategies when other issues such as the teachers’ conception of learning has a major influence on the planning of courses, development of teaching strategies and what students learn. This article proposes a more comprehensive framework for the design, development and implementation of e‐learning systems in higher education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1922

Sixty‐two samples of medicines and drugs taken from supplies for the Colonies were examined as to conformity with the specification. Four samples of foods were also submitted as…

Abstract

Sixty‐two samples of medicines and drugs taken from supplies for the Colonies were examined as to conformity with the specification. Four samples of foods were also submitted as to their purity and suitability for export to hot climates.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Kelli Te Maihāroa

This chapter explores the realm of friendships and peer culture within a total immersion setting in Aotearoa New Zealand as reported by children and families. Based on the gifted…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the realm of friendships and peer culture within a total immersion setting in Aotearoa New Zealand as reported by children and families. Based on the gifted and talented model, this One Day School of Te Reo Māori Excellence named Ka Puananī o Te Reo Māori, caters for children in years 1–6 from across Dunedin city.

Methodology/approach

There were two points of data collection, at the start and end of the first year, undertaken via in-depth semi-structured interviews with six children, three teenagers and 11 family members. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, with the raw data sorted into thematic categories, including highlighted quotes and important text.

Findings

Three themes were identified: engagement, cultural identity and whanaungatanga relationships. The children and families clearly maintained friendships within this immersion school of excellence, but also recognized that many of these relationships permeated beyond the classroom walls, subsequently growing a community of te reo Māori speakers. The findings from this study align with international research on ethnic schools, highlighting a deeper level of friendship and kinship, expressed through a curricula based on inclusive and traditional family values.

Originality/value

This chapter concentrates on the findings of whanaungatanga relationships; the necessity to establish friendships and develop a strong sense of belonging. The research explored the successes and challenges from the perspective of the participants, of the initial year of this unique bilingual pilot programme. This chapter attempts to addresses the gap in international research on children’s reported experiences within an Indigenous total immersion programme.

Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Helle Holmgren

Studies have identified low levels of social support as one of several risk factors for poor psychological outcome following bereavement. Despite this fact, little is known about

Abstract

Studies have identified low levels of social support as one of several risk factors for poor psychological outcome following bereavement. Despite this fact, little is known about how bereaved individuals interpret and define social support or which behaviors they perceive as helpful (Cacciatore, Thieleman, Fretts, & Jackson, 2021). The present study seeks to understand the experiences of the support received by Danish families who have lost a parent to death. Individuals recruited from a mutual bereavement support group (N = 87, 25–59 years old) responded to an online survey, which yielded both quantitative and qualitative data, the latter from open-ended questions and comment boxes. The results demonstrated a variety of sources of support. However, some of the bereaved individuals also reported a decided lack of help for both adults and children post-loss. As most respondents were women (93%), future research might shed more light on possible gender differences in the expectations, needs, and experiences of social support in bereavement. The study participants provided elaborate suggestions for the improvement of bereavement support, such as, practical help, access to bereavement support groups, more knowledge on bereavement and grief in the Danish society, and easier access to peer support. The chapter revealed an apparent lack of coordination of the support for parentally bereaved families. Additionally, some groups of bereaved children seemed to be particularly vulnerable and overlooked, namely the very young children, children in late adolescence/young adulthood, and children with special needs.

Details

Facing Death: Familial Responses to Illness and Death
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-264-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Anja Gibson

Recently, the public and academic discussion on elite education and the selection of top performers in Germany has led to a renewed controversy about social exclusion and…

Abstract

Recently, the public and academic discussion on elite education and the selection of top performers in Germany has led to a renewed controversy about social exclusion and inequality. Consequently, the use of terms such as ‘elite’, ‘excellence’ and ‘intellectual giftedness’ have provoked a debate about the necessity, opportunities, and rejection of educational distinctions. This chapter takes a comparative perspective to examine a private boarding school with a rich tradition, and a relatively new state-run public boarding school, examining their status as exclusive educational institutions, including their selection processes, elite aspirations and educational philosophies. The analysis focusses on how the schools construe themselves as elite and how exclusive membership is created and negotiated within the boarding school context. Using a multilevel qualitative approach and empirical data, this chapter offers findings on mechanisms of elite formation in boarding schools between two poles: the reproduction of an existing elite status and the production of elites from scratch. The analyses show the establishment of a distinct composition of students – either selected by milieu affiliation or by cognitive abilities – resulting in specific processes of coherence and distinction within the school communities. Thus, this chapter makes a contribution to a differentiated observation of new educational hierarchies in Germany.

Details

Elites and People: Challenges to Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-915-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Sarah K. Harkness, Amy Kroska and Bernice A. Pescosolido

We argue that self-stigma places patients on a path of marginalization throughout their life course leading to a negative cycle of opportunity and advancement. Mental health…

Abstract

Purpose

We argue that self-stigma places patients on a path of marginalization throughout their life course leading to a negative cycle of opportunity and advancement. Mental health patients with higher levels of self-stigma tend to have much lower self-esteem, efficacy, and personal agency; therefore, they will be more inclined to adopt role-identities at the periphery of major social institutions, like those of work, family, and academia. Similarly, the emotions felt when enacting such roles may be similarly dampened.

Methodology/approach

Utilizing principles from affect control theory (ACT) and the affect control theory of selves (ACTS), we generate predictions related to self-stigmatized patients’ role-identity adoption and emotions. We use the Indianapolis Mental Health Study and Interact, a computerized version of ACT and ACTS, to generate empirically based simulation results for patients with an affective disorder (e.g., major depression and bipolar disorder) with comparably high or low levels of self-stigmatization.

Findings

Self-stigma among affective patients reduces the tendency to adopt major life course identities. Self-stigma also affects patients’ emotional expression by compelling patients to seek out interactions that make them feel anxious or affectively neutral.

Originality/value

This piece has implications for the self-stigma and stigma literatures. It is also one of the first pieces to utilize ACTS, thereby offering a new framework for understanding the self-stigma process. We offer new hypotheses for future research to test with non-simulation-based data and suggest some policy implications.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

Keywords

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