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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Martin C. Euwema, Evert Van de Vliert and Arnold B. Bakker

In this observation study the theory of conglomerated conflict behavior is tested. The impact of seven conflict behaviors on substantive and relational conflict outcomes…

Abstract

In this observation study the theory of conglomerated conflict behavior is tested. The impact of seven conflict behaviors on substantive and relational conflict outcomes is examined through multiple independent observations of 103 Dutch nurse managers handling a standardized conflict. Results show that process controlling is most important for achieving substantive outcomes, whereas problem solving, confronting, and forcing are most important for relational outcomes. In addition, substantive and relational outcomes are positively related. Implications for managerial practice and training are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Lourdes Munduate, Juan Ganaza, José M. Peiró and Martin Euwema

Most studies of conflict handling styles in organizations analyze these styles separately. These studies assume that individuals are oriented towards the use of one of the…

Abstract

Most studies of conflict handling styles in organizations analyze these styles separately. These studies assume that individuals are oriented towards the use of one of the styles of conflict management. As a result, different styles are compared one by one as if they were independent. In contrast, from a more all‐embracing perspective people are seen as adopting configurations of styles. The interest in this alternative perspective lies in exploring the relations between these styles, how they combine and form patterns of conflict styles. This article presents an exploratory study that seeks to identify empirically the specific combinations of conflict handling styles that result in differentiated patterns within groups of managers. By using hierarchical and non‐hierarchical cluster analyses of a sample of managers, different patterns of conflict management were identified. The effectiveness of each of the resulting patterns was analyzed in terms of its influence on the parties' joint substantive outcomes and their mutual relationship. Results show that patterns using multiple conflict handling styles were more effective than patterns based on a single style.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Malgorzata W. Kozusznik, Hillie Aaldering and Martin C. Euwema

A strong relation between task and relationship conflict has toxic impact on teams and poses a high-risk factor in startup organizations. The purpose of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

A strong relation between task and relationship conflict has toxic impact on teams and poses a high-risk factor in startup organizations. The purpose of this study is to investigate the moderating role of conflict behavior and related coping strategies on the relationship between task and relationship conflict in startup teams.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted surveys among 100 Dutch and German startup members (Study 1) and 75 Belgium startup members (Study 2). In Study 3, 75 startup members completed weekly surveys in 11 consecutive weeks.

Findings

Both Study 1 and 2 show that the positive association between task and relationship conflict is buffered by problem-solving conflict behavior while this relationship is amplified by the use of avoiding strategies in startup teams. Similarly, the results of Study 3 show that individual and team-level problem-focused coping over a period of 11 weeks buffers the association between task and relationship conflict during this period, while individual disengagement coping potentiates it.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature on conflict management and entrepreneurship by studying conflict behavior as a moderator in the association between task and relationship conflict in startup teams. Moreover, it takes a comprehensive perspective by including coping strategies conceptually related to conflict behaviors at both individual and teamlevel, as moderators in this relationship. The results of this study provide practical recommendations for entrepreneurs on how to prevent conflict escalation via conflict-oriented behaviors and more general coping strategies.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Wouter Robijn, Martin C. Euwema, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jana Deprez

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic needs satisfaction between these relations is proposed based on self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was used with 133 employees who rated their leader, their team and their own basic need satisfaction and engagement to analyze the direct and indirect effects simultaneously.

Findings

The analysis confirmed that both engaging leadership and open conflict norms had an indirect effect on work engagement through basic needs satisfaction. Furthermore, engaging leadership was positively related with open conflict norms.

Research limitations/implications

The current study adds to the validation of engaging leadership as it confirms that engaging leaders strengthen work engagement through basic need satisfaction. Furthermore, it shows that not only the leader is important, but the team can impact their well-being through the creation of other social resources as open conflict norms.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence that not only leaders are important to increase work engagement through basic needs satisfaction but also other social resources, such as conflict management. This offers a brand new perspective and opportunities on how to increase work engagement using social resources as conflict management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

IJ. Hetty van Emmerik, Martin C. Euwema, Myrthe Geschiere and Marieke F.A.G. Schouten

The purpose of this study is to focus specifically on formal and informal networking and their relationship with career satisfaction. It was expected that men would engage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to focus specifically on formal and informal networking and their relationship with career satisfaction. It was expected that men would engage more in networking and that men are able to use networking effectively than women, which will be shown in the achievement of greater career satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested with hierarchical regression analyses, using a sample of 180 (69 percent) female and 80 (31 percent) male employees from a Dutch bank.

Findings

Results show that the female respondents engaged more in both formal and informal networking than male respondents. However, hierarchical regression analyses showed that the association between participating in network activities and career satisfaction is significantly stronger for men than for women.

Research limitations/implications

There is certainly a need for longitudinal data to resolve issues concerning differential dropout of women and the development of effective social networks.

Practical implications

The female employees profit less from networking in terms of career satisfaction. One possible solution may be to try to develop especially the networking competences of women.

Originality/value

Elaborating on the social network perspective this study of the participation in formal and informal networks examined gender differences in the association of networking with career satisfaction. Although the female employees in this study engage more in networking, they profit less from it in terms of career satisfaction.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

IJ. Hetty van Emmerik and Martin C. Euwema

This study aims to examine the relationships between personality and three types of OCBs (Organizational Citizenship Behaviors), and to test for the potential moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships between personality and three types of OCBs (Organizational Citizenship Behaviors), and to test for the potential moderating effects of team leader effectiveness on the relationship between personality and OCBs.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested with data from 268 teachers of secondary schools and were analyzed using Zellner's seemingly unrelated regression.

Findings

The results indicate that extroverts and teachers open for experience engaged more in OCBs towards their school than introverts and teachers less open for experience do. Teachers that are more conscientious score higher on OCBs towards students. That fits with the idea that being conscientious is being careful and responsible. Teachers with introvert and neurotic personalities become more engaged in OCBs than extrovert and emotionally stable teachers do when they appreciate their team leader effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study provided only partial support for the expected relationships between personality and OCBs, the results are notable for personnel selection. Further, several instances of the moderating role of team leader effectiveness were found. This indicates that leaders can encourage the engagement in OCBs, even in the case of thwarting personality characteristics.

Originality/value

The results of this study show some interesting similarities and differences concerning the different OCBs. For instance, openness to experience was related to OCBs towards the school and to OCBs towards team members, and the moderating role of team leader effectiveness acted in the same way for openness to experience and OCBs towards the school and towards team members.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Hetty Van Emmerik, S. Gayle Baugh and Martin C. Euwema

This study investigates the influence of affective organizational commitment, career aspirations, and networking activities on propensity to mentor (serving as a mentor…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the influence of affective organizational commitment, career aspirations, and networking activities on propensity to mentor (serving as a mentor and desiring to become a mentor).

Design/methodology/approach

Data from websurveys of 262 managerial employees of a Dutch bank are analyzed using logistic regression.

Findings

Results indicate that affective organizational commitment is unrelated to propensity to mentor, whereas career aspirations are positively related, and networking activities are negatively related to serving as a mentor, but not desiring to be a mentor.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by its reliance on self‐report data and the Dutch culture may have influenced the results of the study to an unknown degree.

Practical implications

Results of this study suggest that employees volunteering to be a mentor are clearly ambitious in terms of their own career, but are not necessarily highly committed to their organization nor do they perform exemplary behaviors in terms of extra role behavior or networking.

Originality/value

Individuals are more likely to engage in mentoring activities and to desire to become a mentor if they have high career aspirations. This relationship may be the result of an instrumental perspective on the part of the mentor, who sees developing a cadre of loyal and supportive organizational members as having a positive effect on his or her own career advancement.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

I.J. Hetty Van Emmerik and Martin C. Euwema

This study seeks to examine the association of employee's evaluation of organizational restructuring with the destruction of old social capital, development of new social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the association of employee's evaluation of organizational restructuring with the destruction of old social capital, development of new social capital, and the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were used from 419 teachers of Dutch secondary schools using hierarchical regression analyses.

Findings

Results show that more positive employees' evaluation of the organizational restructuring are less likely to remain relying on old social capital resources, and score higher on development of new social capital. Moreover, POS mediated the association of employee's evaluation of the organizational restructuring with old and new social capital.

Research limitations/implications

Future research, utilizing longitudinal designs and experiments that better lend it to causal inferences, are needed to examine relationships between organizational restructuring, POS, and social capital.

Originality/value

The results of this study provide a first step toward outlining the importance of organizational restructuring for social capital theory and how employees cope with transition to different work units. In organizations, having a shared language and narratives may allow team members to more easily integrate knowledge and provide better support to one another. Moreover, a common perspective and understanding among team members may allow employees members to anticipate the behavior of other members, thus promoting organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

I.J. Hetty van Emmerik, Arnold B. Bakker and Martin C. Euwema

Departing from the Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model, the paper examined the relationship between job demands and resources on the one hand, and employees' evaluations of…

Abstract

Purpose

Departing from the Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model, the paper examined the relationship between job demands and resources on the one hand, and employees' evaluations of organizational change on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 818 faculty members within six faculties of a Dutch university. Data were analyzed using multilevel analyses with faculty as the grouping variable.

Findings

For the job demands, results show that emotional demands, but not workload, are negatively related to more favorable evaluations of organizational change. Regarding job resources, results show that support from the supervisor, job control, and opportunities for professional development is associated with more favorable evaluations of organizational change. Moreover, job control and support from the supervisor buffered the negative relationship between emotional demands and favorable evaluations of organizational change.

Research limitations/implications

One of the clear implications of this study is that organizations should try to provide their employees with adequate resources together with the ascertaining of jobs with low job demands such that people can fulfill their job without severe adverse working outcomes. If it is impossible to reduce or optimize specific demands, additional job resources should be provided.

Originality/value

The finding that job resources are important in shaping evaluations of organizational change perceptions is consistent with the idea that employees with enough resources will be motivated to do their job and to be motivated to participate in change processes. Employees, who perceive their work environment and their job as highly resourceful, are more likely to anticipate into a pending change effort.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

I.J. Hetty van Emmerik, Arnold B. Bakker and Martin C. Euwema

Departing from Hobfoll's conservation of resources theory, the paper aims to examine the relationship between resource losses (excessive job demands and unfavorable…

Abstract

Purpose

Departing from Hobfoll's conservation of resources theory, the paper aims to examine the relationship between resource losses (excessive job demands and unfavorable performance feedback) on the one hand, and negative job attitudes (dissatisfaction, reduced commitment, intention to leave) and burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal accomplishment) on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included surveys from 272 male constabulary officers who had participated in a developmental assessment center. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression.

Findings

The results showed direct associations between resource losses and negative outcomes. There were indications for the development of loss spirals for four out of six negative outcomes. Specifically, these relationships between job demands and negative outcomes were stronger for those officers receiving unfavorable feedback than for officers not receiving unfavorable feedback.

Practical implications

Employees confronted with excessive job demands and unfavorable developmental assessment center (DAC) feedback were most vulnerable to combined resource losses, and this experience was associated with negative outcomes (i.e. more dissatisfaction, less affective commitment, more emotional exhaustion, and more cynicism).

Originality/value

The unique contribution of this study is that, besides balancing the benefits of using DACs with the costs of implementation, it is emphasized that it is important to anticipate consequences of unfavorable feedback. Moreover, the disappointment and association with negative outcomes should be explicitly considered in the design of the DAC.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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