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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Yasir Abbasi, Mark Broadhurst, Allan Johnston and Sathya Vishwanath

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an adult liaison psychiatry service was established at a hospital introducing the special interest service provision model, which is a…

133

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an adult liaison psychiatry service was established at a hospital introducing the special interest service provision model, which is a cost‐effective method of developing new services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a step‐by‐step process of setting up a new service. Nearly, 20 months after its introduction, the new service was evaluated using a retrospective survey design that involved reviewing the patient referral forms. The authors looked at the demographical data, reasons for referral and the outcome of assessment for patient assessed by this service.

Findings

Results revealed that the majority of the referrals (51 per cent, n=136) were from the medical ward, 56 per cent of the psychiatric assessments were done within 24 hours of the referral, 37 per cent of the assessed patients were provisionally diagnosed with a depressive episode and 24 per cent with substance misuse.

Originality/value

The paper describes a new model of service provision. From the above findings it can be extrapolated that this model of service provision is generalisable and can be replicated anywhere in the UK. This paper would interest clinicians and individuals interested in service development and improving patient care.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
49

Abstract

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Content available
44

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Di Bailey

331

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Ariane Critchley

This chapter considers the mobilities of families subject to child protection involvement at the threshold of the birth of a new baby. The author presents data arising from an…

Abstract

This chapter considers the mobilities of families subject to child protection involvement at the threshold of the birth of a new baby. The author presents data arising from an ethnographic study of child protection social work with unborn babies. This study aimed to draw near to social work practice within the Scottish context through mobile research methods and included non-participant observations of a range of child protection meetings with expectant families. Research interviews were sought with expectant mothers and fathers, social workers and the chair persons of Pre-birth Child Protection Case Conferences. Case conferences are formal administrative meetings designed to consider the risks to children, including unborn children. This chapter focusses on the experiences of expectant parents of navigating the child protection involvement with their as yet unborn infant. The strategies that parents adopted to steer a course through the multiple possibilities in relation to the future care of their infant are explored here. Three major strategies: resistance, defeatism and holding on are considered. These emerged as means by which expectant parents responded to social work involvement and which enabled their continued forwards motion towards an uncertain future.

Details

Families in Motion: Ebbing and Flowing through Space and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-416-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Michele Lloyd

Media power plays a role in determining which news is told, who is listened to and how subject matter is treated, resulting in some stories being reported in depth while others…

Abstract

Media power plays a role in determining which news is told, who is listened to and how subject matter is treated, resulting in some stories being reported in depth while others remain cursory and opaque. This chapter examines how domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is reported in mainstream and social media encompassing newspapers, television and digital platforms. In the United Kingdom, newspapers have freedom to convey particular views on subjects such as DVA as, unlike radio and television broadcasting, they are not required to be impartial (Reeves, 2015).

The gendered way DVA is represented in the UK media has been a long-standing concern. Previous research into newspaper representations of DVA, including our own (Lloyd & Ramon, 2017), found evidence of victim blaming and sexualising violence against women. This current study assesses whether there is continuity with earlier research regarding how victims of DVA, predominantly women, are portrayed as provoking their own abuse and, in cases of femicide, their characters denigrated by some in the media with impunity (Soothill & Walby, 1991). The chapter examines how certain narratives on DVA are constructed and privileged in sections of the media while others are marginalised or silenced. With the rise in digital media, the chapter analyses the changing patterns of news media consumption in the UK and how social media users are responding to DVA cases reported in the news. Through discourse analysis of language and images, the potential messages projected to media consumers are considered, together with consumer dialogue and interaction articulated via online and social media platforms.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Dominic Broadhurst

This paper aims to highlight the value of a library led e-textbook programme at a the UK university.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the value of a library led e-textbook programme at a the UK university.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the results were obtained from two surveys of students. First, from an online survey of 575 students who received an individual copy of an e-textbook from The University of Manchester Library. Second, from a face to face survey of 146 students, based on a random sample of students entering the Alan Gilbert Learning Commons at the University. In addition, a series of one-to-one interviews were conducted with 40 members of academic faculty, who were teaching the course modules, on which the students received their own e-textbook.

Findings

This research highlights the significant benefits a library led e-textbook service can offer to students, academic faculty, the wider University and to the profile of the library. Provision of the e-textbooks leads to higher engagement of learning from students, their increased satisfaction with the University and Library, plus addresses issue of reducing their direct costs. It also leads to enhanced pedagogy from the perspective of academic faculty.

Practical implications

The paper addresses issues of inequality of provision for individual students and contributes to enhanced learning for all students.

Originality/value

Library led initiatives are very new in this field and this project is one of the first to both undertake this provision and to undertake extensive research to assess the value of the project.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Bernal Osborne

TO MARK what in their new celebration brochure is colourfully and correctly described as ‘a century of progress’, Millers Oils promoted a series of open day hospitality events…

Abstract

TO MARK what in their new celebration brochure is colourfully and correctly described as ‘a century of progress’, Millers Oils promoted a series of open day hospitality events over the period 20–22 May, with twice‐daily sessions at the Brighouse, West Yorkshire plant.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2022

Fiona Mackenzie

In 2020, the Westminster Government proposed statutory provision prohibiting the use of ‘consent to serious harm for sexual gratification’ as a defence to criminal charges of…

Abstract

In 2020, the Westminster Government proposed statutory provision prohibiting the use of ‘consent to serious harm for sexual gratification’ as a defence to criminal charges of violence. This addition to the Domestic Abuse bill was made in response to the 18 month campaign by We Can’t Consent To This and a cross party group of MPs, after rising numbers of homicides of women where the perpetrators claimed the woman asked for the violence, in ‘rough sex’, ‘gone wrong’.

This research is based on new data and detailed analysis on 67 non-fatal violent assaults and 24 homicides where the accused claimed that this violence was consensual, focussing on criminal cases in England and Wales over the 10 years from 2010. Some earlier cases are included for historical context and particularly where they became influential in later Criminal Justice System (CJS) outcomes. It addresses a shortage of data on the use of ‘consent’ claims in defence to charges of fatal and non-fatal violence, using keyword searches on historic news and legal archives and submissions from victims in criminal cases to establish the extent of these claims, the nature of the assaults claimed consensual, and to assess the CJS’s response to the claims.

This research – part of the evidence from We Can’t Consent To This which was considered by Government – set out the case for new law on consent defences to violence, despite there being existing common law in England and Wales. This research finds that the so-called ‘rough sex’ defences have been successful in deflecting prosecution for violence against women for decades, identifying failings at every stage of the CJS, in fatal and non-fatal violent assaults. Notably the women injured in these criminal cases do not agree that they consented to the violence, where they are able to take part in criminal proceedings. But still the claims that they did appear to have succeeded.

This research proposes that change in attitudes and outcomes is needed at every stage of the CJS, and, with the UK Government proposing to keep the criminal law on this ‘under review’, identifying where further provision in law or in practice may be needed.

Details

‘Rough Sex’ and the Criminal Law: Global Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-928-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2022

Alexandra Fanghanel

Using original transcripts of cases in which ‘sex games’ have ‘gone wrong’, this chapter examines how the practice of bondage and sado-masochism (BDSM) is figured in legal…

Abstract

Using original transcripts of cases in which ‘sex games’ have ‘gone wrong’, this chapter examines how the practice of bondage and sado-masochism (BDSM) is figured in legal discourses and the implications this understanding of it has for debates about consent and sexual violence. The premise that consent to sexual violence might act as a defence or mitigating factor in cases which go to trial suggests that something understood as BDSM is recognized as a legitimate sexual practice by the courts. Recognizing the legitimacy of marginalized sexual practices can be understood as a progressive way to recognize individuals’ autonomy and freedom, within the contemporary neoliberal framework in which these cases play out. Campaigners against the judgement of the foundational Brown case make this clear (The Spanner Trust, n.d.). Yet, BDSM practice has also been mobilized to justify or diminish the significance of sexualized violence against women (Harman & Garnier, 2019, July 19).

This chapter navigates the line between these two priorities to interrogate the ways in which courts themselves interpret and understand BDSM. Gaining insight into how courts might be said to ‘operationalise’ BDSM, we can gain some insight into the role that consent plays in understanding sexual violence, including the work that consent has to do to turn an act of sexual violence into one of BDSM.

In order to do this work, I have acquired nine transcripts of crown court cases from 2010 to 2020 in which a ‘rough sex’ defence was used. Conducting a discourse analysis of how BDSM is imagined in these cases, in dialogue with previous I have conducted on consent and BDSM communities (Fanghanel, 2019, 2020), this chapter traces how knowledge about BDSM in created, and how this becomes used to affect justice outcomes.

Details

‘Rough Sex’ and the Criminal Law: Global Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-928-7

Keywords

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