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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Mariana Bayley and Rachel Hurcombe

This paper reports drinking patterns among minority ethnic groups from the UK literature over the past 15 years, and considers the evidence for service provision and support…

2603

Abstract

This paper reports drinking patterns among minority ethnic groups from the UK literature over the past 15 years, and considers the evidence for service provision and support. Findings show that drinking remains low among minority ethnic groups, though with evidence of increases in consumption, particularly among Indian women and Chinese men. South Asian men, particularly Sikh men, are over‐represented for liver cirrhosis, and some ethnic groups have higher than national average alcohol‐related deaths. People from black and minority ethnic backgrounds have similar rates of alcohol dependency as the white population; however services do not appear to be responsive enough to the needs of minority ethnic groups as they are under‐represented in seeking treatment and advice for drinking problems. Help‐seeking preferences vary for drinking problems between and within groups suggesting that drinking problems need to be addressed within both mainstream and specialist services. Greater understanding of cultural issues is needed in the development of alcohol services in mainstream and specialist settings.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Rachel Hurcombe, Mariana Bayley, Anthony Thickett and Betsy Thom

Travellers are consistently found to have poorer health outcomes and health status than other minority ethnic groups. Very few studies have examined alcohol use among Travellers…

213

Abstract

Purpose

Travellers are consistently found to have poorer health outcomes and health status than other minority ethnic groups. Very few studies have examined alcohol use among Travellers, but some indicate that their drinking patterns are changing. This study aims to explore alcohol use, health needs and health service access within an Irish Traveller population in England with a view to identifying themes for further study.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory pilot study was carried out using an oral life history approach. Ten individuals were interviewed along with two professionals working closely with the Traveller group.

Findings

While improvements in general health and access to healthcare were widely reported, many Travellers were concerned about the effects of leaving behind their nomadic lifestyle to living more “settled” lives. This change was felt to bring young male Travellers, in particular, into contact with the risky drinking behaviours of non‐Travellers and away from the monitoring and informal controls traditionally accompanying their former nomadic lifestyle.

Research limitations/implications

These findings may not generalise to other Traveller groups; they draw on a small sample of Travellers living in “settled” accommodation. The sample was limited to discussions with older Travellers and further research is needed among younger generations to explore how health related behaviours and alcohol use may be changing.

Originality/value

This study highlights potential pathways for young male Travellers to become “youth at risk” importantly through involvement in alcohol and drug use. It should be of value to health policy makers and health/support workers in contact with Traveller communities.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

David Sallah

210

Abstract

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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