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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Young-seok Kim and Louise Cooke

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a big data analysis of public library operations and services of two cities in two countries by using the Chernoff face method.

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1895

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a big data analysis of public library operations and services of two cities in two countries by using the Chernoff face method.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is designed to evaluate library services by analyzing the Chernoff face. Big data on public libraries in London and Seoul were collected, respectively, from Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy and the Korean government’s website for drawing a Chernoff face. The association of variables and human facial features was decided by survey. Although limited in its capacity to handle a large number of variables (eight were analyzed in this study) the Chernoff face method does readily allow for the comparison of a large number of instances of analysis. A total of 58 Chernoff faces were drawn from the formatted data by using the R programming language.

Findings

The study reveals that most of the local governments in London perform better than those of Seoul. This consequence is due to the fact that local governments in London operate more libraries, invest more budgets, allocate more staff and hold more collections than local governments in Seoul. This administration resulted in more use of libraries in London than Seoul. The study validates the benefit of using the Chernoff face method for big data analysis of library services.

Practical implications

The Chernoff face method for big data analysis offers a new evaluation technique for library services and provides insights that may not be as readily apparent and discernible using more traditional analytical methods.

Originality/value

This study is the first to use the Chernoff face method for big data analysis of library services in library and information research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Ernest F. Cooke, Louise W. Smith and Doris C. Van Doren

Defines the nature and use of specialty advertising. Looks at theperceived value of specialty advertising to industrial company marketersand shows the trends as determined…

Abstract

Defines the nature and use of specialty advertising. Looks at the perceived value of specialty advertising to industrial company marketers and shows the trends as determined by a nation‐wide (US) survey in actual use in specific categories of sales promotion media. Concludes that manufacturers should actively seek ′the right item′ for each of its target markets.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Louise Cooke and Hazel Hall

This paper aims to review the value of social network analysis (SNA) as a method appropriate to LIS research. SNA is used to investigate the effectiveness of a framework…

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1323

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the value of social network analysis (SNA) as a method appropriate to LIS research. SNA is used to investigate the effectiveness of a framework of methods adopted by the DREaM project to develop researcher-practitioner networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the literature on SNA, the paper reports longitudinal research from a whole population sample of the DREaM cadre of LIS researchers. Data were collected using a questionnaire at the start of the first DREaM project workshop, and at the final workshop. Data were analysed using Ucinet 6 software, and network diagrams were visualised using the Netdraw package.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that the combination of linked workshops and use of social media throughout the DREaM project was successful in increasing the density of the researcher networks, forging new connections among participants. SNA was found to be a useful technique in investigating network development.

Research limitations/implications

There is scope for further longitudinal research to investigate the sustainability and strength of the new network links forged.

Originality/value

The use of SNA in the context of the development of researcher networks is novel in LIS research. The findings from this project indicate the potential of the DREaM methodology as a replicable framework for developing further research networks in other contexts. This paper represents a unique contribution in demonstrating through the use of SNA the extent of the extension of research networks afforded by the DREaM methodology.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Louise Cooke

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385

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Louise Cooke and Helen Greenwood

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of research into the extent and impact of restricted access by specific groups of staff to ICT‐based communications in…

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1886

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of research into the extent and impact of restricted access by specific groups of staff to ICT‐based communications in UK further and higher education institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods. A questionnaire survey was distributed to all HEFCE‐funded institutions in the UK. Six institutions acted as case study sites for in‐depth qualitative investigation using documentary analysis and semi‐structured interviews.

Findings

Lack of hardware and network infrastructure posed less of a barrier than lack of ICT skills, lack of motivation either to use computers or to gain ICT skills, and line manager resistance to staff using computers or accessing ICT training in work time. Job function was the factor most associated with lack of access, with cleaning, catering and estates staff least likely to have access. However, there were also many examples of good practice to extend staff access, particularly with regard to ICT training. The research concludes that one of the main concerns for institutions is to “win the hearts and minds” of non‐desk staff and their managers. The development of an institutional communication strategy is identified as being of critical importance.

Research limitations/implications

Provides a “snapshot” of the prevailing situation at the point of data collection rather than a longitudinal insight into developments in access over time.

Originality/value

The first comprehensive analysis of staff access to ICT in UK further and higher education. In addition to highlighting examples of good practice for dissemination across the sector, the research provides information about gaps in provision to inform the targeting of future initiatives.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Adrienne Muir, Rachel Spacey, Louise Cooke and Claire Creaser

This paper aims to consider selected results from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded “Managing Access to the internet in Public Libraries” (MAIPLE…

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3935

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider selected results from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded “Managing Access to the internet in Public Libraries” (MAIPLE) project, from 2012-2014. MAIPLE has explored the ways in which public library services manage use of the internet connections that they provide for the public. This included the how public library services balance their legal obligations and the needs of their communities in a public space and the ethical dilemmas that arise.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used a mixed-method approach involving a review of the literature, legal analysis, a questionnaire survey and case studies in five public library authorities.

Findings

UK public library services use a range of methods to regulate internet access. The research also confirms previous findings that filtering software is an ubiquitous tool for controlling access to and protecting library users from “inappropriate”, illegal and harmful internet content. There is a general, if sometimes reluctant, acceptance of filtering software as a practical tool by library staff, which seems to contrast with professional codes of ethics and attitudes in other countries. The research indicates that public library internet access will be a valued service for some time to come, but that some aspects of how public library services regulate internet access is currently managed can have socially undesirable consequences, including blocking legitimate sites and preventing users from accessing government services. Education could play a greater part in helping the general population to exercise judgement in selection of materials to view and use. This does not preclude implementing stricter controls to protect children, whilst allowing public libraries to continue providing a social good to those who are unable to otherwise participate in the digital age.

Research limitations/implications

The response to the survey was 39 per cent meaning that findings may not apply across the whole of the UK. The findings of this study are compared with and supplemented by other quantitative sources, but a strength of this study is the depth of understanding afforded by the use of case studies.

Originality/value

This paper provides both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of how internet access is managed in UK public libraries, including how library services fulfil their legal obligations and the ethical implications of how they balance their role in facilitating access to information with their perceived role as a safe and trusted environment for all members of their communities. The findings add to the international discussion on this issue and stimulate debate and policy making in the UK.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Rachel Spacey, Louise Cooke, Adrienne Muir and Claire Creaser

The purpose of this paper is to review current knowledge, research and thinking about the difficulties facing public libraries offering internet access to their users in…

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7352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current knowledge, research and thinking about the difficulties facing public libraries offering internet access to their users in ensuring legally compliant and non-offensive use of this facility whilst still adhering to the professional value of freedom of access to information.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of recently published sources (1997-2013) relating to the technical and organisational measures used to manage public internet access primarily in public libraries in the UK with some limited international examples were reviewed and analysed. This work was undertaken as the underpinning research for an AHRC-funded project, MAIPLE (Managing Access to the internet in Public Libraries).

Findings

The provision of public internet access is a well-established component of the role of public libraries, but is seen as a potential problem due to the possibility of misuse, and it appears that simplistic technical solutions have disappointed. Legislation increases the need for more effective solutions that can provide a balance between the need for legal compliance, a welcoming environment for users, and the protection of key freedoms. A range of measures are being adopted worldwide in response to this dilemma.

Originality/value

Research exploring internet access in public libraries and its management in the UK is numerically small and much of it dates back to the start of the twenty-first century. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of the available literature and is of relevance to practitioners and academics in the fields of public librarianship.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

John Israilidis, Evangelia Siachou, Louise Cooke and Russell Lock

The purpose of this paper is to identify individual variables with an impact on knowledge sharing and explore the under-discussed construct of employees’ ignorance. This…

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2728

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify individual variables with an impact on knowledge sharing and explore the under-discussed construct of employees’ ignorance. This can enhance the knowledge-sharing process and facilitate the development of greater intellectual capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Eighty-four dependent variables affecting knowledge sharing are analyzed and classified into 11 categories. In addition, the direct effect of employees’ ignorance on knowledge sharing is introduced and empirically investigated in a case study of a multinational organization operating within the aerospace and defense industry.

Findings

The findings suggest that employees’ ignorance may negatively affect their intention to share knowledge, thus leading to poor decision-making and communication in organizations. Employees’ ignorance could also limit the organizational ability to repel external threats, implement innovation and manage future risks.

Originality/value

A classification scheme based on different categories of employees’ ignorance is developed, providing tailor-made recommendations for practitioners facing different types of ill-informed organizational scenarios. Further, the need to shift the emphasis away from the management of knowledge to the management of ignorance is also an important contribution of this paper.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Rachael Lindsay, Thomas W. Jackson and Louise Cooke

In light of a growing trend towards mobile information management and a UK governmental drive for police forces to implement mobile technologies and realise significant…

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3518

Abstract

Purpose

In light of a growing trend towards mobile information management and a UK governmental drive for police forces to implement mobile technologies and realise significant benefits, it is important to examine the factors affecting officer acceptance. There appears to be little understanding of the key factors, yet this is critical to the success of the initiative. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the main factors that influence the usage of mobile technologies amongst police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, partially ethnographic design was followed to allow an in‐depth exploration of this issue. The study was based on a mixed‐methods longitudinal evaluation study of the implementation of mobile technologies within a UK police force over a nine‐month period. The technology acceptance model (TAM) and the subsequent TAM2 and TAM3, were then reengineered to provide a suitable theoretical model for a mobile policing context.

Findings

In total, four main categories of officer acceptance factors were identified: officer performance, security/reliability, management style and cognitive acceptance. Evidence from the study showed a key shortfall in all three versions of the TAM in that they focus on the user perspective and did not confirm the broader organisational factors within the implementation and social contexts of mobile policing.

Originality/value

Consequently, an adapted mobile‐TAM (m‐TAM) was produced that incorporated these factors into the existing TAM elements. The high‐level nature of the adapted model for mobile policing means it could be applied by other police forces and potentially other organisations, regardless of the type of mobile device implemented, to address the barriers to acceptance. The m‐TAM addresses the need for a more relevant and robust model to the mobile policing paradigm, which goes beyond the static technology environment in which the TAM2 and TAM3 were built.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Camilla Haw, Jane Radley and Louise Cooke

The purpose of this paper is to describe the characteristics of adult male autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients admitted to low secure services and to compare them…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the characteristics of adult male autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients admitted to low secure services and to compare them with non‐ASD patients.

Design/methodology/approach

Case‐control study of admissions to two ASD units and one non‐ASD unit at a tertiary referral centre. Subjects were compared on demographic, personal, clinical and offending behaviour variables.

Findings

In total, 51 ASD and 43 controls were studied. Median age at diagnosis of ASD was 21 years (range 6‐56). The ASD group were younger (median age 27 vs 33 years) and more likely to be single than controls. Their age at first contact with psychiatric services was lower and proportionally more were admitted from prison and courts. Almost three‐quarters had psychiatric comorbidity, most commonly schizophrenia, but unlike controls, personality disorder and drug and alcohol disorders were uncommon. Lifetime sexually inappropriate behaviour and physical violence were less common, as was non‐compliance with medication. However, 78 per cent had a lifetime history of physical violence and a third had a conviction for GBH or homicide. Offending behaviour was sometimes atypical in nature and some had convictions for unusual offences such as harassment and stalking.

Research limitations/implications

The age difference between cases and controls is likely to have confounded the results. Findings cannot be generalised to the NHS.

Originality/value

This group of ASD patients in low security differed in several important respects from their non‐ASD counterparts, which highlights their differing treatment needs, strengths and weaknesses.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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