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1 – 10 of 72
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Kenneth Andrew Searle, Liz Ellis, Marianthi Kourti, Andrea MacLeod, Caroline Lear, Callum Duckworth, Davide Irvine, Harry Jones, Michaela King, Jessica Ling and John Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs) the opportunity to design and undertake a project researching the experiences of autistic university students.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory approach was implemented, engaging autistic university students as research assistants. All the research team except project co-ordinators were autistic. Undergraduate autistic students developed and conducted a set of semi-structured interviews, with two autistic alumni responsible for data analysis and both scheduling and moderating focus groups. Participation in dissemination of the findings was open to all.

Findings

The results included in this paper reflect a portion of the overall findings, specifically regarding the participatory approach. The findings of the study indicate the perceptions of respondents being interviewed by autistic researchers in relation to their shared understanding, facilitating positive feelings and a sense of rapport in the interview process. The PAs were able to improve their research skills through the project, which contributed constructively to their CV and allowed them to feel more positive about being autistic, and specifically about being an autistic researcher.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to discuss the challenges and benefits of including autistic participant researchers at all stages of the research project, including research design, data collection, analysis and dissemination, being co-written by both project co-ordinators and autistic project researchers.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2023

Kevin Magill and Liz Harrelson Magill

The purpose of the study was to explore and articulate how Socratic seminar might be considered more completely as part of justice-focused social studies classroom disciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to explore and articulate how Socratic seminar might be considered more completely as part of justice-focused social studies classroom disciplinary practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the literature on Socratic seminar and developed a model for its practical use. The authors used the model to demonstrate its use in teaching civil rights history, as an example for implementation.

Findings

Socratic seminar is an instructional method that layers several disciplinary literacy skills within social studies that have the combined potential to create a transformative dialogue within the classroom and communities, especially when leveraged in more complex multi-text ways. Through the seminars, students can better understand what the authors name horizontal historical analysis, the perspective on concurrent social justice movements and vertical curricular analysis or how social justice movements experience continuity and change over time.

Practical implications

The authors provided an accessible model for teachers and students to use Socratic seminars as part of transformational social studies practices.

Social implications

The authors demonstrate how the Socratic seminar model can provide students with the intellectual foundation for considering social action as more critically informed civic agents.

Originality/value

The authors examine and offer a model of how Socratic seminar can engage students in vertical and/or horizontal historical analysis for transformational purposes. Further, the authors identify how Socratic seminar can build the skills and dispositions of social studies, provide space for knowledge creation through critical historical inquiry and help reframe how teachers and students understand learning and human relationships by shifting the classroom power and promoting student agency through dialogue.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Ron Coleman, Liz Ellis and Mike Smith

This paper is a discussion of how an organisation providing community support developed its employment strategy to focus on gainful employment, valued employment roles…

Abstract

This paper is a discussion of how an organisation providing community support developed its employment strategy to focus on gainful employment, valued employment roles, citizenship and human rights, from a traditional model with support/activity workers and sheltered employment, to social firms, employment development and supported employment at differing levels.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2011

Andy Brooker

This article describes the development of the Arts and Social Network, a unique resource developed specifically to provide social opportunities for people who experience social…

Abstract

This article describes the development of the Arts and Social Network, a unique resource developed specifically to provide social opportunities for people who experience social exclusion because of theirdiagnostic labels of personality disorder. It supports people to make new connections with others who face similar challenges through monthly arts‐based events held in and around central London.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Janet Davey, Lily Schneider and Howard Davey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of intellectual and marketing capital disclosure among fashion companies, specifically to compare intellectual…

4393

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of intellectual and marketing capital disclosure among fashion companies, specifically to compare intellectual capital (IC) disclosure between European and North American fashion companies as well as between fashion industry sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

A coding framework proposed by Guthrie and Petty and adapted by Shareef and Davey was further developed for the fashion context and the top 15 European companies and the top 15 North American companies with accessible 2005 annual reports were analysed.

Findings

The voluntary annual report disclosures confirmed brands as highly valuable capital assets, central to competitiveness and differentiation in this industry. Fashion firm disclosures also reflected organisational change processes and philosophies in several cases. However it is concluded that fashion companies do not value the role of the consumer in the brand value dynamic, customer satisfaction, nor customer loyalty as intellectual capital assets.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations include the subjectivity of the coding process and because many fashion houses remain in private ownership.

Practical implications

Many items of IC are marketing related, however the disclosure of marketing capital and the implications for value adding potential needs better understanding. Traditional accounting practices only partially recognise the value of an organisation's intellectual capital and therefore, the organisation's ability to generate wealth in the future is poorly represented.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the IC disclosure literature in a fresh and unique way by analysing the fashion industry for the first time.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Joy M. Pahl, Ed Chung, Iris Jenkel and Ruth B. McKay

The College of St. Germain is a private, liberal arts college in the U.S. Midwest. Several faculty members developed and launched an academic business and economics conference…

Abstract

The College of St. Germain is a private, liberal arts college in the U.S. Midwest. Several faculty members developed and launched an academic business and economics conference. Despite of a lack of funding from the college, and a general apathy among other colleagues, the conference became financially self-sufficient and grew each year, with increasing attendance and submissions from many international scholars. Part A of the case focuses on the beginning, planning, and growth stages of the conference, and culminates with the successful conclusion of the third annual conference and planning for the fourth conference. Part B focuses on the fourth and fifth conferences, and concludes with the surprising cancellation of the sixth annual conference. The case highlights the challenges and accomplishments of the conference chairpersons and the organizing committee, as well as management, marketing, and leadership factors that contributed to the ultimate demise of the conference.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1544-9106

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Temitope Sarah Bodunrin and Tim Stone

This paper aims to investigate the idea of eating for pleasure and its effect on consumer well-being. It begins by introducing the concept of food well-being (FWB) under the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the idea of eating for pleasure and its effect on consumer well-being. It begins by introducing the concept of food well-being (FWB) under the transformative consumer research (TCR) agenda. Subsequently, it provides detailed discussions on the concept of pleasure, under which food practices involving epicurean pleasure and hedonic and eudaimonic consumption will be discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a different approach to the usual qualitative methodologies by using the introspective analysis of the film Eat, Pray, Love where the consumption of food for pleasure was heavily practiced.

Findings

This paper presents the introspective voice of the lead author’s food consumption. It reveals a food consumption practice which followed an initial loss of taste, to alternative food consumption (AFC) and finally slow food ingestion. The journey of her epicurean ingestion revealed pleasurable experiences that reflected a positive subjective well-being (SWB). This attitude of ingesting food and living for the moment propelled the idea that food well-being is more about consumer happiness.

Originality/value

This paper is novel in its approach to use film introspection to probe the concept of FWB within TCR. Additionally, it reveals the transitioning moment of AFC that leads to pleasurable experience. It also reveals that a personal investment in cooking for self restores taste and improves SWB. Overall, it showcases how the appreciation of the sensations of food from its taste, as it was ingested gradually, leads to the total experiential feeling embedded in food consumption.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Danielle Bessett

Popular self-help pregnancy literature suggests a “generational disconnect” between pregnant women and their mothers, emphasizing the incommensurate experiences of the two…

Abstract

Popular self-help pregnancy literature suggests a “generational disconnect” between pregnant women and their mothers, emphasizing the incommensurate experiences of the two generations. Based on longitudinal, in-depth interviews with a diverse group of 64 pregnant women and 23 grandmothers-to-be, this chapter explores how different generations of women negotiate the idea of a disconnect and its implications for the medicalization of pregnancy. My findings showed limited support for the generational disconnect. Nearly all of the pregnant women I interviewed who were in contact with their mothers consulted them to assess issues related to pregnancy embodiment. Black and Latina women and white women with less than a college degree disregarded or even rejected the disconnect; they tended to frame their mothers’ advice as relevant. Their mothers attended prenatal care appointments and frequently expressed skepticism about medical directives. By contrast, I found that highly educated white women tended to endorse the generational disconnect when it came to matters related to pregnancy health behaviors – what to eat, how much to exercise – and their obstetric care. The mothers of these women not only largely supported the generational disconnect, but also bonded with their daughter over a shared appreciation for scientific understandings of pregnancy. Foregrounding women’s perspectives provides insights into meaning-making in pregnancy and the ways that mothers of pregnant women can both stymie and deepen medicalization of childbearing.

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Liz McDonnell, Lesley Murray, Tamsin Hinton-Smith and Nuno Ferreira

‘Living together apart’ (LTA) is the practice of remaining in close domestic proximity following the ending of an intimate relationship. Using the conceptual framework of families…

Abstract

‘Living together apart’ (LTA) is the practice of remaining in close domestic proximity following the ending of an intimate relationship. Using the conceptual framework of families in motion, in which families are re-envisioned as in flow, responding to all kinds of disruptions, chosen and unchosen, by ‘holding on’, adapting, adjusting and redirecting, this chapter explores the family practices involved in LTA. Using collaborative autoethnography – a research process in which the authors jointly explored data from their own lives – the authors were able to develop an understanding of LTA that was attentive to everyday life and the interconnections of time and space within families. The authors found that when families are living within less normative constellations, there are fewer scripts to rely upon and the potential for non-legitimacy and anxiety increases. The data also showed how deeply families are embedded in practices that are always in relation to an experienced past and imagined future. The importance of having a family story to tell that ‘works’ socially and emotionally, as well as having a home that can spatially encompass such new flows in family lives, is crucial.

Details

Families in Motion: Ebbing and Flowing through Space and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-416-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Sue Monk and Elizabeth Mackinlay

The purpose of this paper is to explore their experiences as singers in a community choir called Arrkula (a Yanyuwa word meaning “one voice”) based in the School of Education at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore their experiences as singers in a community choir called Arrkula (a Yanyuwa word meaning “one voice”) based in the School of Education at the University of Queensland as performance of song, self, social justice and seeing beyond boundaries. Performing at “gigs” inside and outside the university, Arrkula has been singing together since 2011, and despite an environment replete with neo-liberal ideals of individualism, competitiveness and capitalist driven research agendas, at the centre of their song remains a yearning for social connection, equality and renewed consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors take an autoethnographic creative approach and bring performance of song together with their stories and interviews with choir members to link the “secret space” of the rehearsal with the “public space” of staged performances.

Findings

The authors’ aim is to think and perform the potential the voice and voices of Arrkula hold in terms of heightening senses of agency, provoking and empowering a pursuit of freedom and transforming lived worlds through song.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is the authors’ take up of Maxine Greene’s (2005, p. 38) question, “if we can link imagination to our sense of possibility and our ability to respond to other human beings, can we link it to the making of community as well?” to consider what singing for democracy and difference might mean individually and collectively in the current climate of higher education.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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